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Catalytic Oxidative Carbonylation over Cu2O Nanoclusters Supported on Carbon Materials: The Role of the Carbon Support

Authors

  • Bing Yan,

    1. Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 022-87401818
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  • Dr. Shouying Huang,

    1. Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 022-87401818
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  • Dr. Shengping Wang,

    1. Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 022-87401818
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  • Prof. Dr. Xinbin Ma

    Corresponding author
    1. Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 022-87401818
    • Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 022-87401818

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Abstract

Stable catalysts prepared by dispersing Cu2O nanoparticles on activated carbon were investigated in the oxidative carbonylation of methanol to dimethyl carbonate. The effect of the surface oxygen containing groups (OCGs) on the rate of dimethyl carbonate formation and the selectivities of the catalyst for dimethyl carbonate and the byproduct methyl formate were determined. The carbon support surface OCGs played a key role in the oxidative carbonylation. For carbon supports with the same amount of OCGs, the highest catalytic activity was achieved at a certain level of Cu loading. The optimal Cu loading as well as catalytic activity increased linearly with the amount of OCGs. The active sites of the catalysts were the Cu2O nanoparticles that coordinated to the OCGs on the carbon surface.

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