ChemCatChem

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 1

August 24, 2009

Volume 1, Issue 1

Pages 1–175

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Editorial Board
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlights
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Palladium-Catalyzed Carbonylation Reactions of Alkenes and Alkynes (ChemCatChem 1/2009) (page 1)

      Anne Brennführer, Helfried Neumann and Matthias Beller

      Version of Record online: 11 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200990001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows just a small sample of the techniques associated with the wide-ranging chemistry of catalysis, reflecting this new journal's remit of crossing the boundaries of the classical catalytic disciplines of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, as well as biocatalysis. In their Review on page 28ff., Beller et al. outline recent developments and selected organic applications in the area of palladium-catalyzed carbonylation reactions of alkenes and alkynes with different nucleophiles. Picture courtesy of Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse e.V. at the University of Rostock.

  2. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Editorial Board
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlights
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      ChemCatChem: A Catalyst for Communication (pages 3–4)

      Peter Gölitz and David J. Smith

      Version of Record online: 18 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900147

    2. You have free access to this content
      Combined Success for Efficient Catalysis (page 5)

      Uwe T. Bornscheuer

      Version of Record online: 23 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900144

    3. You have free access to this content
      Pushing the Boundaries of Catalysis (page 6)

      Luis A. Oro

      Version of Record online: 23 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900145

    4. You have free access to this content
      Crossing the Interfaces of Catalysis (page 7)

      Bert M. Weckhuysen

      Version of Record online: 23 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900146

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Editorial Board
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlights
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Editorial Board
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlights
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
  5. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Editorial Board
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlights
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. The Editorial Board (pages 20–23)

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900165

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Editorial Board
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlights
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Palladium-Catalyzed Carbonylation Reactions of Alkenes and Alkynes (pages 28–41)

      Anne Brennführer, Helfried Neumann and Matthias Beller

      Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900062

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Transition metal-catalyzed carbonylation reactions are a useful tool for the preparation of bulk and fine chemicals. This review covers recent developments in the area of palladium-catalyzed carbonylation reactions of unsaturated compounds such as alkenes and alkynes. Either linear or branched carboxylic acids, esters, or amides are produced efficiently by applying carbon monoxide and different nucleophiles.

    2. Biocatalytic Routes to Optically Active Amines (pages 42–51)

      Matthias Höhne and Uwe T. Bornscheuer

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900110

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Various enzymatic approaches for the synthesis of optically active amines are reviewed, including the use of lipases for kinetic resolution, monoamine oxidases for deracemization, and transaminases for both kinetic resolution and asymmetric synthesis (see Scheme). Limitations, such as substrate and product inhibition, can be overcome by combination with additional enzymes.

  7. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Editorial Board
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlights
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Solid Catalysts on the Nanoscale: Design of Complex Morphologies and Pore Structures (pages 53–67)

      Wolfgang Schmidt

      Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900125

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Solid catalyst performance is determined not only by their composition but, to a great extent, also by morphological properties. Deliberate design and creative synthesis strategies allow the preparation of solid catalysts for heterogeneously catalyzed reactions with a high degree of control with respect to pore topology and particle morphology.

  8. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Editorial Board
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlights
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Transition Metal-Catalyzed Regioselective Functionalization of Aromatic Compounds (pages 69–71)

      Jung-Woo Park and Chul-Ho Jun

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900093

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Things can't only getmeta: Recent developments in regioselective functionalization of substituted arenes with transition metal catalysts include ortho functionalization by directed metallation and unusual meta-functionalization reactions which are difficult to achieve by conventional electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions.

    2. Acceptorless Dehydrogenation of Alcohols: Perspectives for Synthesis and H2 Storage. (pages 72–73)

      Anja Friedrich and Sven Schneider

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900124

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Without acception: Acetals are selectively obtained from acceptorless alcohol dehydrogenation (AAD) of aliphatic primary alcohols catalyzed by a ruthenium complex bearing an acridine-based PNP pincer ligand. This unprecedented reaction represents a new tool for one-step acetal synthesis under mild reaction conditions and demonstrates that AAD selectivity can be controlled by changes to the catalyst ligand sphere.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Editorial Board
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlights
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. A Highly Reusable Carbon-Supported Platinum Catalyst for the Hydrogen-Transfer Reduction of Ketones (pages 75–77)

      Francisco Alonso, Paola Riente, Francisco Rodríguez-Reinoso, Javier Ruiz-Martínez, Antonio Sepúlveda-Escribano and Miguel Yus

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900045

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A carbon-supported platinum catalyst, prepared by the impregnation method followed by reduction under hydrogen, is highly reusable in the hydrogen-transfer reduction of aromatic ketones, using 2-propanol as the hydrogen donor. Up to six different aromatic ketones can be effectively reduced using the same catalyst sample.

    2. Shape-Selective Conversion of Methanol to Hydrocarbons Over 10-Ring Unidirectional-Channel Acidic H-ZSM-22 (pages 78–81)

      Shewangizaw Teketel, Stian Svelle, Karl-Petter Lillerud and Unni Olsbye

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900057

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The shape of things to come: The zeolite catalyst ZSM-22, previously believed to be inactive in the conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons, is found to yield a unique product spectrum. Owing to shape selectivity the product is rich in branched C5+ alkenes, without the formation of aromatic products. This discovery has potential implications for the production of cleaner transportation fuels from natural gas or biomass.

    3. Rhodium-Catalyzed Decarbonylative Coupling Reactions of Diphenylketene with Alkenes (pages 82–84)

      Teruyuki Kondo, Yukiko Tokoro, Yasuyuki Ura, Kenji Wada and Take-aki Mitsudo

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900075

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The decarbonylative coupling reaction of diphenylketene with 2-norbornene, catalyzed by [{RhCl(CO)2}2], proceeds smoothly in toluene to give the corresponding substituted cyclopropane, 3,3-diphenyltricyclo[3.2.1.02, 4]octane, in good yield. The corresponding reaction of diphenylketene with electron-deficient terminal alkenes leads to the linear coupling products.

    4. Fengphos, a Ferrocene-Based Chiral Diphosphine: Synthesis and Applications (pages 85–88)

      Xiangdong Feng, Benoît Pugin, Björn Gschwend, Felix Spindler, Martin Paas and Hans-Ulrich Blaser

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900134

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fengphos is a type of ferrocenyl diphosphine incorporating axial as well as central chirality, which is synthesized in three steps from Ugi amine (see scheme). Acting as ligands, they are effective in the Rh-catalyzed hydrogenation of a wide range of substrates, including dimethyl itaconate (ee values greater than 99 %) and ethyl β-acetamido acrylate (ee values up to 95 %).

    5. A Single Point Mutation Reverses the Enantiopreference of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus Secondary Alcohol Dehydrogenase (pages 89–93)

      Musa M. Musa, Nathan Lott, Maris Laivenieks, Leandra Watanabe, Claire Vieille and Robert S. Phillips

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The asymmetric reduction of benzylic and heteroaryl ketones to the corresponding (R)-alcohols using I86A Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus alcohol dehydrogenase (I86A TeSADH) is described. This single amino acid mutation not only makes the active site of I86A TeSADH able to accommodate more sterically demanding substituents than those accommodated by wild-type TeSADH, but it also reverses the substrate stereospecificity of TeSADH.

    6. Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Materials for Enantioselective Organocatalysis (pages 94–98)

      Vivek Srivastava, Kevin Gaubert, Mathieu Pucheault and Michel Vaultier

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900035

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      State of clay: Chiral organic–inorganic hybrid materials based on amino acid-exchanged clays are prepared and used for heterogeneous asymmetric organocatalysis. Co-inclusion of ammonium cations within interlayers greatly enhances yields and selectivities. Recyclability of the material is evaluated, showing no decrease in enantioselectivity or conversion after ten cycles.

    7. Spatiotemporal Multitechnique Imaging of a Catalytic Solid in Action: Phase Variation and Volatilization During Molybdenum Oxide Reduction (pages 99–102)

      Matthew G. O'Brien, Andrew M. Beale, Simon D. M. Jacques, Marco Di Michiel and Bert M. Weckhuysen

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900042

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Caught in the act: A novel combined experimental setup is demonstrated, which uses very high energy/flux synchrotron X-rays and allows the measurement of spatiotemporal data on larger reactors and the use of techniques such as fluorescence spectroscopy and Compton scattering. Wide-angle X-ray and Compton scattering reveal information on the causes of molybdenum volatilization in partial oxidation catalysts.

    8. Fast and Selective Hydroaminomethylation Using Xanthene-Based Amino-Functionalized Ligands (pages 103–106)

      Bart Hamers, Etienne Kosciusko-Morizet, Christian Müller and Dieter Vogt

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900088

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hydroaminomethylation of 1-octene and piperidine has been carried out using a pyrrole-substituted phosphine ligand (see Scheme; L), giving extremely high activities (TOF≈6200 h−1) and selectivities (linear/branched ratios>200). Acidic alcohols in the solvent mixture lead to higher activities but lower selectivities, whereas less acidic alcohols give extraordinarily good selectivities.

    9. Mechanistic Insights from Isotopic Studies of Glucose Conversion to Aromatics Over ZSM-5 (pages 107–110)

      Torren R. Carlson, Jungho Jae and George W. Huber

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900130

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The fast and the furanose: Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising new route for the production of aromatics from biomass. However, little is known about the chemistry occurring within the catalyst. Through isotopic labeling studies, insights into controlling the chemistry of catalytic fast pyrolysis are revealed.

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Editorial Board
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlights
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Magnetically Separable Gold Catalyst for the Aerobic Oxidation of Amines (pages 111–115)

      Linda Aschwanden, Barbara Panella, Peggy Rossbach, Beat Keller and Alfons Baiker

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900085

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A magnetically separable gold catalyst is developed and applied for the aerobic oxidation of amines. The catalyst is prepared by a simple route and consists of gold nanoparticles formed in situ on a superparamagnetic ceria–iron oxide support. The gold catalyst combines the excellent catalytic properties of gold on ceria with the advantages of being easily separable and recyclable.

    2. Tuning Reactivity and Selectivity for Olefin Oxidation through Local O Bonding on Au (pages 116–121)

      Byoung Koun Min, Xingyi Deng, Xiaoying Liu, Cynthia M. Friend and Ali Reza Alemozafar

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900101

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The reactivity and selectivity for oxidation of propene and acrolein promoted by O-covered Au depend strongly on the cluster size and the local bonding of oxygen. The smaller, disordered O-containing gold clusters formed at 200 K show much higher reactivity and selectivity toward partial oxidation as compared to those formed at 400 K where only a fraction of surface oxygen species participates in reaction and leads solely to combustion.

    3. Alkene Polymerization Catalysts Bearing Tridentate Phenoxyamine Ligands with sp3 C Donors (pages 122–130)

      Joseph B. Edson, Ivan Keresztes, Emil B. Lobkovsky and Geoffrey W. Coates

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900122

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Starving for electrons: Coordinatively unsaturated group IV tribenzyl complexes supported by phenoxyamine ligands with pendant vinyl-group functionality facilitate a rare intramolecular insertion of the ligand-appended alkene into a neutral group IV metal–carbon bond. Zirconium and hafnium complexes furnish living olefin polymerization catalysts, whereas metalation with titanium produced a catalytically inactive titanium(II) alkene complex.

    4. Deactivation of TEM-1 β-Lactamase Investigated by Isothermal Batch and Non-Isothermal Continuous Enzyme Membrane Reactor Methods (pages 131–137)

      Thomas A. Rogers, Roy M. Daniel and Andreas S. Bommarius

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900120

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Equilibrium Model is used in conjunction with isothermal batch deactivation data of TEM-1 β-lactamase to locate the enzyme's optimum operating temperature. In comparison, non-isothermal continuous data are collected in a membrane reactor system (CSTR) and fitted to a four-state deactivation model. Both methods demonstrate that TEM-1 β-lactamase does not follow the Lumry–Eyring model of protein denaturation.

    5. The Role of Water in Platinum-Catalyzed Cycloisomerization of 1,6-Enynes: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Gas Phase Study (pages 138–143)

      Sigrid Baumgarten, Denis Lesage, Vincent Gandon, Jean-Philippe Goddard, Max Malacria, Jean-Claude Tabet, Yves Gimbert and Louis Fensterbank

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900003

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Everything goes around the water: By means of mass spectroscopy and density functional computations, the role of water in PtII-catalyzed cycloisomerization of 1,6-enynes (see Scheme; L=ligand) is shown to be crucial. Calculations lead to speculation that coordination of water to the metal center could open a faster route to cycloisomerization products by avoiding chelate formation with the enyne system. This effect is reproduced experimentally.

    6. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Reactivity Studies of a Series of Ruthenium Catalysts (pages 144–151)

      Katarzyna Jarzembska, Sudipta Seal, Krzysztof Woźniak, Anna Szadkowska, Michał Bieniek and Karol Grela

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900052

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is applied to six selected ruthenium precatalysts. The XPS data obtained, compared by reactivity and structural results, confirm some dependencies such as the electron-donor properties of the substituents at the ruthenium center. Additionally, the data combined with structural and reactivity results explain the differences between the character of Grubbs and Hoveyda catalysts.

    7. Mechanistic Investigation of Iron-Catalyzed Coupling Reactions (pages 152–161)

      Jonatan Kleimark, Anna Hedström, Per-Fredrik Larsson, Charlotte Johansson and Per-Ola Norrby

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900061

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Positive iron: The active catalyst and the mechanism of the iron-catalyzed C[BOND]C coupling are determined by a combination of reaction progress monitoring and density functional calculations. The rate-limiting step is the oxidative addition of an FeI species to the aryl electrophile. Methods for stabilizing the catalyst are also identified.

    8. Tetrabenzyltitanium: An Improved Catalyst for the Activation of sp3 C[BOND]H Bonds Adjacent to Nitrogen Atoms (pages 162–172)

      Insa Prochnow, Raphael Kubiak, Okko N. Frey, Rüdiger Beckhaus and Sven Doye

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900092

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A detailed study of intra- and intermolecular hydroaminoalkylation reactions performed with a number of different titanium-based catalysts suggests that tetrabenzyltitanium ([TiBn4], Bn=benzyl) is a preferred catalyst for practical synthetic hydroaminoalkylation procedures, giving improved yields (compared to [Ti(NMe2)4]) and facilitating the isolation of products.

  11. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Editorial Board
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlights
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemCatChem 2/2009 (page 175)

      Version of Record online: 11 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200990003

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION