ChemCatChem

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 3

November 9, 2009

Volume 1, Issue 3

Pages 329–419

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Report
    11. Book Review
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: The Effect of Confined Space on the Growth of Naphthalenic Species in a Chabazite-Type Catalyst: A Molecular Modeling Study (ChemCatChem 3/2009) (page 329)

      Karen Hemelsoet, Arno Nollet, Matthias Vandichel, David Lesthaeghe, Veronique Van Speybroeck and Michel Waroquier

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200990009

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows a goldfish trapped in too small a fishbowl. In a similar manner, bulky species confined within the pores of a zeolites may or may not have the potential to grow further. This theory is put to the test by Van Speybroeck et. al in their paper on page 373 ff., by determining ab initio rate coefficients of growth reactions involving bicyclic compounds within a chabazite-type zeolite. Owing to the severe space limitations, the importance of dispersive interactions is highlighted. The results exclude bicyclic compounds as active hydrocarbon pool species within the sidechain mechanism during the methanol-to-olefin process.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Report
    11. Book Review
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Report
    11. Book Review
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Report
    11. Book Review
    12. Preview
    1. Catalytic Propargylic Substitution Reactions (pages 342–356)

      Yoshihiro Miyake, Sakae Uemura and Yoshiaki Nishibayashi

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900214

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Here comes the sub: This Review describes recent advances in catalytic propargylic substitution reactions. In addition to transition metals, such as ruthenium, rhenium, copper, titanium, and gold, several Lewis acids and Brønsted acids can promote these reactions effectively. The reaction mechanism and the scope of nucleophiles that can be used depend on the nature of the catalysts. Some examples of enantioselective reactions are also included.

  5. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Report
    11. Book Review
    12. Preview
    1. Perrhenate Esters in New Catalytic Reactions (pages 357–362)

      Stéphane Bellemin-Laponnaz

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900206

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rapid Re action: Although the use of alkyltrioxorhenium complexes as catalysts has been widely studied, perrhenate esters (O3ReOR) catalysts have attracted much less attention. A growing number of highly active and selective catalytic methods have been developed with the help of perrhenate esters in recent years, opening up new opportunities in organic chemistry.

  6. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Report
    11. Book Review
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Understanding Structure–Performance Relationships in Oxidic Catalysts: Controlling Shape and Tuning Performance (pages 363–364)

      Jeroen A. van Bokhoven

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900157

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Morphabulous: Heterogeneous catalysts often consist of nanosized metal or metal oxide particles and the morphology of these crystals is crucial to their performance. By controlling the synthetic conditions, the shape of the crystals can be varied, which affects the exposed surfaces and ultimately influences the property and activity of the material. Structures with well-defined or controlled surfaces are desirable.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Report
    11. Book Review
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Aminotroponiminate–Zinc Complex-Functionalized Mesoporous Materials: Efficient and Recyclable Intramolecular Hydroamination Catalysts (pages 365–368)

      Cole T. Duncan, Stephanie Flitsch and Tewodros Asefa

      Version of Record online: 11 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900114

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recycling Day: A heterogeneous aminotroponiminate–Zn complex-functionalized mesoporous material prepared by grafting and post-synthetic modification, is used as a recyclable efficient catalyst for the intramolecular hydroamination reaction of non-activated alkenes. Hydroamination is carried out through five cycles without the loss of catalytic activity.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Selective Hydrogenation of Single Benzene Ring in Biphenyl Catalyzed by Skeletal Ni (pages 369–371)

      Lianhai Lu, Zeming Rong, Wenqiang Du, Shaohui Ma and Shuang Hu

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900141

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The nickel lining on a Raney day: Highly selective catalytic hydrogenation of biphenyl (BP) to cyclohexylbenzene (CHB) was achieved by using skeletal Ni prepared from rapidly quenched Ni–Al alloys ribbons, affording 100 % conversion and 99.4 % selectivity in a one-pot reaction.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Report
    11. Book Review
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      The Effect of Confined Space on the Growth of Naphthalenic Species in a Chabazite-Type Catalyst: A Molecular Modeling Study (pages 373–378)

      Karen Hemelsoet, Arno Nollet, Matthias Vandichel, David Lesthaeghe, Veronique Van Speybroeck and Michel Waroquier

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900208

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Big fish in a small pond: The growth of bulky naphthalenic species within a zeolite with chabazite topology is investigated. Computed rate coefficients of methylation reactions reveal that the zeolite pore dimensions do not prohibit the formation of large trimethylated bicyclic compounds.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Bifunctional Chiral Catalyst for the Synthesis of Chiral Cyclic Carbonates from Carbon Dioxide and Epoxides (pages 379–383)

      Tao Chang, Lili Jin and Huanwang Jing

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900135

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Salen on the cyclic C s: Bifunctional chiral catalysts combining a metal–salen (salen=N,N′-bis(salicylidene)cyclohexenediaminato) complex and a quaternary onium salt have been developed for the catalytic kinetic resolution of racemic epoxides with CO2 to generate chiral cyclic carbonates in high yield and with good enantioselectivity. These new catalysts can be reused more than five times without any obvious loss of activity or enantioselectivity.

    3. You have free access to this content
      A DFT Study of CO Catalytic Oxidation by N2O or O2 on the Co3O4(110) Surface (pages 384–392)

      Xiang-Lan Xu, E Yang, Jun-Qian Li, Yi Li and Wen-Kai Chen

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900115

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The reaction mechanisms for CO catalytic oxidation by N2O or O2 on the Co3O4(110) surface are studied by DFT slab calculations. After the Co3+ site is completely covered, CO adsorbs at the neighboring twofold coordinated surface oxygen atom bonded to Co2+ and Co3+ cations, resulting in the formation of CO2 and an oxygen vacancy. The CO oxidation reaction follows the Mars–van Krevelen mechanism.

    4. Suzuki Cross-Coupling Reactions Catalyzed by an Aliphatic Phosphine-Based Pincer Complex of Palladium: Evidence for a Molecular Mechanism (pages 393–400)

      Roman Gerber, Olivier Blacque and Christian M. Frech

      Version of Record online: 1 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900169

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The aliphatic pincer complex 1 is an excellent catalyst for the Suzuki reaction. Mechanistic investigations indicate that phenyl pincer complex 3 is the key intermediate of the catalytic cycle, and either undergoes oxidative addition with aryl bromides, to form hexacoordinated PdIV intermediates, followed by reductive elimination of the coupling products or direct biaryl formation on the PdII center via a four-centered transition state.

    5. You have free access to this content
      Olefin Production by a Multistep Oxidative Dehydrogenation in a Perovskite Hollow-Fiber Membrane Reactor (pages 401–405)

      Oliver Czuprat, Steffen Werth, Steffen Schirrmeister, Thomas Schiestel and Jürgen Caro

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900176

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A multistep permeating hollow-fiber membrane reactor with successive oxygen-permeable and passivated surface segments is introduced. This geometry allows a controlled oxygen insertion into the reactor over an extended length, to overcome the equilibrium conversion, and provides a lower oxygen concentration giving higher ethene selectivity by burning off the hydrogen formed by conventional catalytic dehydrogenation.

    6. Mesoporous Silica Nanosphere-Supported Chiral Ruthenium Catalysts: Synthesis, Characterization, and Asymmetric Hydrogenation Studies (pages 406–413)

      David J. Mihalcik and Wenbin Lin

      Version of Record online: 9 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900188

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ru on MSN? Chiral RuCl2–diphosphine–diamine complexes with a pendant siloxy group are grafted onto three different types of mesoporous silica nanospheres (MSNs), and the resulting MSN-supported Ru catalysts are highly active for asymmetric hydrogenation of aromatic ketones and racemic arylaldehydes, to afford chiral secondary alcohols and chiral primary alcohols, respectively.

  9. Conference Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Report
    11. Book Review
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
  10. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Report
    11. Book Review
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts: New Approaches based on Synthesis, Characterization and Modeling. Edited by Umit S. Ozkan (page 417)

      Gadi Rothenberg

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900170

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2009. 322 pp., hardcover, € 139.00.—ISBN 978-3-527-32079-0

  11. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Report
    11. Book Review
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemCatChem 4/2009 (page 419)

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200990012

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION