ChemCatChem

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 12

December 10, 2010

Volume 2, Issue 12

Pages 1489–1627

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Platinum-Like Catalytic Behavior of Au+ (ChemCatChem 12/2010) (page 1489)

      S. Ted Oyama, Jason Gaudet, Wei Zhang, Dang Sheng Su and Kyoko K. Bando

      Article first published online: 26 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201090047

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      The cover picture shows the dramatic change in the catalytic activity of supported metallic gold nanoparticles brought about by their treatment with cyanide solution. In their Full Paper on p. 1582 ff., Oyama et al. describe how this treatment does not result in dissolution of the nanoparticles, as previously thought, but in their reprecipitation as gold cyanide particles. When this happens, their catalytic activity changes from oxidation to reduction. Thus, the product of the reaction between propylene and H2/O2 mixtures shifts from propylene oxide to propane. In this manner, oxidized gold acquires the catalytic properties of platinum, its neighbor in the periodic table.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
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    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemCatChem 12/2010 (pages 1491–1497)

      Article first published online: 26 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201090048

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
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    1. Heterogeneously Catalyzed Ammoxidation: A Valuable Tool for One-Step Synthesis of Nitriles (pages 1504–1522)

      Dr. Andreas Martin and Dr. Venkata Narayana Kalevaru

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000173

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      Give N to Me: Ammoxidation is a partial oxidation with selective insertion of nitrogen into an activated methyl group in the α-position to double bonds of olefinic, aromatic, or heteroaromatic hydrocarbons to produce nitriles. Many major industrial products are manufactured in this way. Herein, reaction examples, catalysts, mechanistic views, and market information are comprehensively reviewed.

  5. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
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    1. Gaining Selectivity by Combining Catalysts: Sequential versus Recycling Processes (pages 1523–1532)

      Dr. Linda Fransson and Prof. Christina Moberg

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000267

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      Together we are stronger: It may be advantageous to use two catalysts instead of striving to improve the selectivity of a single catalyst. Sequential asymmetric synthesis/kinetic resolution, whereby the minor enantiomer S is transformed to a compound P, results in products with high enantiopurity, even by use of moderately selective catalysts, although the yield of the product is diminished. Recycling of the minor enantiomer avoids this limitation.

  6. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Catalytic Transfer of Chiral Information from an Organic Compound to a Coordination Complex (pages 1533–1534)

      Prof. M. Fontecave

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000291

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      Chirality bites: Use of a bidentate chiral sulfoxide auxiliary SO (see scheme) allows the first catalytic asymmetric synthesis of a chiral octahedral metal complex containing only achiral ligands, as shown from the conversion of the achiral complex trans-[Ru(bipyridine)2(CH3CN)2]2+ into Δ-[Ru(bipyridine)3]2+ in the presence of an excess of bipyridine.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
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    1. “Double-Peak” Catalytic Activity of Nanosized Gold Supported on Titania in Gas-Phase Selective Oxidation of Ethanol (pages 1535–1538)

      Olga A. Simakova, Dr. Vladimir I. Sobolev, Prof. Konstantin Yu. Koltunov, Betiana Campo, Anne-Riikka Leino, Dr. Krisztián Kordás and Prof. Dmitry Yu. Murzin

      Article first published online: 12 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000298

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      Seeing double: Au/TiO2, in contrast to Au supported on silica and alumina, shows “double-peak” catalytic activity in partial oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde by molecular oxygen (see diagram). The additional low-temperature peak (indicated by the arrow) probably corresponds to the specific participation of oxygen generated on Au/TiO2 surface under mild reaction conditions.

    2. Oxidative Coupling of Methane with High C2 Yield by using Chlorinated Perovskite Ba0.5Sr0.5Fe0.2Co0.8O3−δ as Catalyst and N2O as Oxidant (pages 1539–1542)

      Hongfei Liu, Yanying Wei, Prof. Dr. Jürgen Caro and Prof. Dr. Haihui Wang

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000217

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      Assess the C2-ation: A novel chlorinated perovskite-type oxide is prepared as catalyst for oxidative coupling of methane in a packed-bed reactor. Chlorine doping significantly improves the selectivity towards C2 species (C2H6 and C2H4). Furthermore, using N2O instead of O2 as oxidant, to some extent, prevented the deep oxidation of C2. As a result, a high C2 yield was acquired.

    3. Facile Synthesis of Mesoporous Magnetic Nanocomposites and their Catalytic Application in Carbon–Carbon Coupling Reactions (pages 1543–1547)

      Dr. Sankaranarayanapillai Shylesh, Lei Wang, Dr. Serhiy Demeshko and Prof. Werner R. Thiel

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000215

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      A ‘bottom-up’ approach is utilized for assembling magnetic nanoparticles in a mesoporous silica solid for the generation of a magnetic nanocomposite. Grafting of a palladium complex of the type (L)2PdCl2 (L=Si(OMe)3 functionalized PPh3) results in an active, recyclable catalyst for C[BOND]C coupling reactions.

    4. The Effect of Organic Impurities Originating from the Incomplete Combustion of Organic Templates on the Methanol-to-Olefins Reaction over SAPO-46 (pages 1548–1551)

      Weili Dai, Wenbo Kong, Prof. Landong Li, Dr. Guangjun Wu, Prof. Naijia Guan and Prof. Niu Li

      Article first published online: 12 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000213

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      Pool yourself together: SAPO-46 is studied as a catalyst for the methanol-to-olefins (MTO) reaction (see figure), which is generally accepted to occur by a hydrocarbon pool mechanism. The organic impurities, which originate from the incomplete combustion of the organic template, play a key role in the MTO reaction.

    5. Ce3+-Centric Organic Pollutant Elimination by CeO2 in the Presence of H2O2 (pages 1552–1554)

      Pengfei Ji, Lingzhi Wang, Dr. Feng Chen and Prof. Dr. Jinlong Zhang

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000191

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      Deadly cerias: The decomposition of organics in a CeO2/H2O2 system is achieved through their reaction with the interfacial peroxide species on CeO2. The reactivity however relies on a necessary level of Ce3+ for activation. The concentration of Ce3+ from the interfacial peroxide species was ensured by the reaction of adsorbed organics.

    6. A Facile and Controlled Route to Prepare an Eggshell Pd Catalyst for Selective Hydrogenation of Phenylacetylene (pages 1555–1558)

      Zhengfeng Shao, Chuang Li, Xiao Chen, Min Pang, Dr. Xinkui Wang and Prof. Dr. Changhai Liang

      Article first published online: 18 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000186

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      Walking on eggshells: A facile and controlled route is presented to prepare Pd catalyst with an eggshell structure by CO reduction deposition of PdCl2 on a SiO2–Al2O3 support in ethanol aqueous solution at room temperature. The as-prepared eggshell Pd catalyst exhibits a higher activity than the uniform one.

    7. Spinel-Type Cobalt–Manganese-Based Mixed Oxide as Sacrificial Catalyst for the High-Yield Production of Homogeneous Carbon Nanotubes (pages 1559–1561)

      Dr. Jean-Philippe Tessonnier, Michael Becker, Dr. Wei Xia, Dr. Frank Girgsdies, Dr. Raoul Blume, Dr. Lide Yao, Dr. Dang Sheng Su, Prof. Martin Muhler and Prof. Robert Schlögl

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000278

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      Sacrificing the catalyst: Controlled reduction of a spinel-type Co–Mn-based mixed oxide leads to a collapse of the oxide structure and the nucleation of 10 nm Co particles. This catalyst facilitates the growth of homogeneous carbon nanotubes with yields 2–9 times higher than those reported to date, indicating that carbon nanotubes might finally become a commodity chemical.

    8. AgMoVO6: A Promising Catalyst for Selective Gas-Phase Oxidation of o-Xylene (pages 1562–1564)

      Dr. Andrey Karpov, Dr. Christine Deissler, Cornelia-Katharina Dobner, Prof. Dr. Hartmut Hibst, Dr. Gerhard Cox, Dr. Nadine Brem, Dr. Stephan Andreas Schunk, Prof. Dr. Robert E. Dinnebier and Dr. Frank Rosowski

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000224

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      MoVing on up: AgMoVO6, a new crystalline catalyst for the gas-phase oxidation of o-xylene, with a remarkably high selectivity to value products, has been developed by high-throughput experimentation. Doping of the catalyst with elements such as P results in further enhancement of the catalytic properties.

    9. Selective Trimerization of Ethylene to Isohexenes Catalyzed by a Ruthenium(0) Complex (pages 1565–1568)

      Prof. Dr. Teruyuki Kondo, Keisuke Yamamoto, Daisuke Takagi, Lingfeng Shen, Yuki Yoshida, Dr. Yu Kimura, Prof. Dr. Akio Toshimitsu, Masahiko Kuramoto and Dr. Yasushi Shiraki

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000219

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      The trimers, they are a-changin': A zero-valent ruthenium complex, [Ru(η6-cot)(η2-dmfm)2] (cot=1,3,5-cyclooctatriene, dmfm=dimethyl fumarate), catalyzes the trimerization of ethylene to specifically give isohexenes without aluminum compounds or alkylating organometallic reagents. No alkenes larger than C8 are obtained. The reaction may proceed via ruthenacyclopentane intermediates, rather than the expected ruthenacycloheptane.

    10. Controllable Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis by In Situ-Produced 1-Olefins (pages 1569–1572)

      Dr. Xiaohao Liu and Prof. Makoto Tokunaga

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000193

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      Take control: A highly controllable Fischer–Tropsch synthesis on the product distribution in a batch slurry-phase reactor has been achieved by utilizing the in situ-produced 1-olefins in the presence of a small amount of water. The selectivity in the range of C8–C30 is increased, along with an increase in the carbon number (n) leading to appreciable deviation from the conventional Anderson–Schulz–Flory distribution.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
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    1. Structure–Reactivity Relationship Studies for Guanidine-Organocatalyzed Direct Intramolecular Aldolization of Ketoaldehydes (pages 1573–1581)

      Dr. Cynthia Ghobril, Dr. Peter Hammar, Dr. Sanjeevarao Kodepelly, Prof. Dr. Bernard Spiess, Dr. Alain Wagner, Prof. Dr. Fahmi Himo and Dr. Rachid Baati

      Article first published online: 30 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000227

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      The importance of being aldol: Several bifunctional guanidine catalysts have been synthesized and their reactivities were evaluated in the direct intramolecular aldolization of ketoaldehydes. An experimental and theoretical structure–reactivity study allowed determination of the required structural and physicochemical features required for efficient catalysts.

    2. Platinum-Like Catalytic Behavior of Au+ (pages 1582–1586)

      S. Ted Oyama, Jason Gaudet, Wei Zhang, Dang Sheng Su and Kyoko K. Bando

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000218

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      All that glitters isn't necessarily platinum: Treatment of supported gold nanoparticles with cyanide solutions does not dissolve the metal, but instead causes reprecipitation of gold(I) cyanide. The selectivity of the resulting catalyst in the reaction of propylene with H2/O2 mixtures changes dramatically from propylene oxide to propane, a product typical of platinum.

    3. Catalytic Transformation of Ethanol with Silicalite-1: Influence of Pretreatments and Conditions on Activity and Selectivity (pages 1587–1593)

      Dr. Cristina Della Pina, Ermelinda Falletta, Prof. Antonella Gervasini, Dr. J. Henrique Teles and Prof. Michele Rossi

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000208

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      Conditioned response: The facile, highly selective dehydration of ethanol widens the market towards green chemicals. When employed as a catalyst for the vapor-phase dehydration of ethanol, silicalite-1 undergoes acid activation and base deactivation. In particular, pretreatment with aqueous HCl strongly promotes the production of diethyl ether at lower temperatures or ethene at higher temperatures.

    4. Poisoning Experiments Aimed at Discriminating Active and Less-Active Sites of Silica-Supported Tantalum Hydride for Alkane Metathesis (pages 1594–1598)

      Dr. Guillaume Saggio, Dr. Mostafa Taoufik, Dr. Jean-Marie Basset and Dr. Jean Thivolle-Cazat

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000199

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      Toxic assets: Only 50 % of the silica-supported tantalum hydride sites are active in the metathesis of propane. Indeed, more than 45 % of the tantalum hydride can be eliminated by a selective oxygen poisoning of inactive sites with no significant decrease in the global turnover. Conversely, cyclopentane induces no such selective poisoning.

    5. Evolution of Platinum Particles Dispersed on Zeolite upon Oxidation Catalysis and Ageing (pages 1599–1605)

      Dr. Mickaël Rivallan, Dr. Sébastien Thomas, Dr. Muriel Lepage, Nobuyuki Takagi, Dr. Hirohito Hirata and Dr. Frédéric Thibault-Starzyk

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000182

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      To be this good takes ageing: Colloid impregnation and ion-exchange methods for the preparation of platinum-containing zeolites give two distinct types of catalyst. The former leads to platinum nanoparticles on the outer surface of the zeolite, whereas the latter introduces Pt inside the pores. The active sites are consequently confined in two different locations, as shown by 2D IR spectroscopy. Activity in CO oxidation is lower when Pt is in the pores.

    6. Synthesis by Replacement Reaction and Application of TiO2-Supported Au–Ni Bimetallic Catalyst (pages 1606–1614)

      Dr. Zhijie Wu, Zongfang Zhao and Prof. Minghui Zhang

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000165

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      Instant replace: A highly active and stable TiO2-supported Au–Ni bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst for hydrodechlorination is synthesized by electroless nickel plating and the sequential chemical replacement reaction of Ni and Au3+. Larger Au–Ni nanoparticles exhibit higher activity and stability for chlorobenzene hydrodechlorination, suggesting a structure-sensitive reaction

    7. Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of rac-2-Hydroxy-1-indanone by using a Heterogeneous Ru(OH)3/Al2O3 Racemization Catalyst and Lipase (pages 1615–1621)

      Otto Långvik, Tiina Saloranta, Alexey Kirilin, Dr. Arto Liljeblad, Dr. Päivi Mäki-Arvela, Prof. Liisa T. Kanerva, Prof. Dmitry Yu. Murzin and Prof. Reko Leino

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000161

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      Dynamic kinetic resolution of rac-2-hydroxy-1-indanone is performed after selecting the best heterogeneous racemization catalyst. Using lipase AK (Pseudomonas fluorescens) and Ru(OH)3/Al2O3 for dynamic kinetic resolution, 92 % ee at 85–90 % conversions are obtained.

  9. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlight
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
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      Preview: ChemCatChem 1/2011 (page 1627)

      Article first published online: 26 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201090050

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