ChemCatChem

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 1

January 11, 2010

Volume 2, Issue 1

Pages 1–111

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Viewpoints
    13. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Volcano Relation for the Deacon Process over Transition-Metal Oxides (ChemCatChem 1/2010) (page 1)

      Felix Studt, Frank Abild-Pedersen, Heine A. Hansen, Isabela C. Man, Jan Rossmeisl and Thomas Bligaard

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201090001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows the activity volcano plot for the heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of HCl (the Deacon Process), where the turnover frequency is plotted against the reaction temperature and the dissociative oxygen binding energy. In their paper on page 98 ff., Bligaard et al. establish an activity relationship for the Deacon process over rutile transition metal oxides by combining density functional calculations with microkinetic modeling. RuO2 is found to be the best catalyst among the investigated materials.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Viewpoints
    13. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Silica-Supported Silver Nanoparticles with Surface Oxygen Species as a Reusable Catalyst for Alkylation of Arenes (ChemCatChem 1/2010) (page 2)

      Ken-ichi Shimizu, Yuji Miyamoto and Atsushi Satsuma

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201090003

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Japanese wisteria (Wisteria floribunda) is a woody liana with clusters of flowers. In their paper on pp. 84 ff., K. Shimizu et al. show that supported silver nanoparticles, represented by the Japanese wisteria, act as a catalyst for the alkylation of arenes with alcohols and styrenes. Cooperation of surface Ag and adjacent O atoms leads to cleavage of the α-C[BOND]H bond of alcohols.

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Viewpoints
    13. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      ChemCatChem: Looking To The Future (pages 3–4)

      Peter Gölitz, Emily Seo and David J. Smith

      Version of Record online: 14 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900304

  4. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Viewpoints
    13. Preview
  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Viewpoints
    13. Preview
  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Viewpoints
    13. Preview
    1. Palladium-Catalyzed C3 or C4 Direct Arylation of Heteroaromatic Compounds with Aryl Halides by C[BOND]H Bond Activation (pages 20–40)

      Julien Roger, Aditya L. Gottumukkala and Henri Doucet

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900074

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      C4 yourself: C3 and C4 arylations of heteroaromatic compounds by C[BOND]H bond activation have attracted much less attention than C2 or C5 arylations, owing to the lower reactivity of C3 and C4 positions in such reactions. However, in recent years several new results, using modified and improved catalysts and reaction conditions, have been reported, which permit C3 and C4 arylations with synthetically useful yields.

  7. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Viewpoints
    13. Preview
    1. Catalysis in Carbon Nanotubes (pages 41–47)

      Philippe Serp and Eva Castillejos

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900283

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Different on the inside: In recent years, the use of carbon nanotubes in catalysis has increased greatly. This Minireview discusses the different strategies used for selective confinement of nanoparticles in the inner cavity of carbon nanotubes and the effects of this confinement on chemical reactivity, and highlights the benefits that could be expected from these unique nanocatalysts.

  8. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Viewpoints
    13. Preview
    1. Unraveling the Reaction Mechanism of NOx Removal by Highly Time-Resolved IR Spectroscopy (pages 49–50)

      Andreas Jentys

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900203

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      NO work, NO pay: The reaction mechanism of NOx removal is studied by highly time-resolved IR spectroscopy. Thibault-Starzyk et al. show how this technique can lead to the understanding of catalytic reactions by identifying potential reaction intermediates on the surface of the catalyst.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Viewpoints
    13. Preview
    1. Catalytic Activity of Metal Nanoparticles Supported on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Spheres (pages 51–54)

      Amit A. Deshmukh, Rafique Ul Islam, Michael J. Witcomb, Willem A. L. van Otterlo and Neil J. Coville

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900224

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sphere of influence: Various transition metal (Ru, Pd and V) particles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanospheres have been synthesized and their catalytic activity studied for the chemoselective hydrogenation of diketones, the oxidation of styrene, and C[BOND]C bond formation (Heck and Suzuki) reactions. The catalysts show very high activity, selectivity, and recyclability in these reactions.

    2. Asymmetric Induction by Chiral Borate Anions in Enantioselective Hydrogenation using a Racemic Rh[BOND]Binap Catalyst (pages 55–57)

      Dianjun Chen, Basker Sundararaju, Rafael Krause, Jürgen Klankermayer, Pierre H. Dixneuf and Walter Leitner

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900229

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      With a little help from my friend: Combination of the racemic binap ligand with enantiopure bis-(S)-binol-borate anion results in enantioselectivities up to 57 % ee in the rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of dimethyl itaconate, which corresponds to 85 % of the asymmetric induction caused by the enantiopure binap ligand.

    3. Aerobic Oxidative Dehydrogenation of 2-Substituted Imidazolines Promoted by a Cyclometalated Ruthenium Catalyst (pages 58–60)

      Ayako Taketoshi, Akitsu Tsujimoto, Shusaku Maeda, Takeaki Koizumi and Takaki Kanbara

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900251

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Complex answer to a simple question: The aerobic oxidative dehydrogenation of 2-substituted imidazolines to their corresponding imidazoles has been achieved. A cyclometalated homogeneous RuIII complex, [RuCl(ppy)(tpy)][PF6] (see scheme), worked as a catalyst under mild conditions without the need for a co-oxidant.

    4. Substituent- and Catalyst-Dependent Selectivity to Aldol or Nitrostyrene Products in a Heterogeneous Base-Catalyzed Henry Reaction (pages 61–66)

      Krishna K. Sharma, Ankush V. Biradar and Tewodros Asefa

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900259

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Regarding Henry: Selective catalysis to the β-nitrostyrene or nitroalcohol products of the Henry reaction is demonstrated for substituted benzaldehyde reactants containing electron-donating and -withdrawing substituents, respectively, using secondary and tertiary amine-functionalized mesoporous catalysts. The effects of substituents at para, ortho, and meta positions of the aromatic aldehydes on the reaction are also established.

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Viewpoints
    13. Preview
    1. Enantio- and Diastereoselective Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of C2-Symmetric Biaryl-Containing Diols (pages 67–72)

      Edyta Burda, Walter Bauer, Werner Hummel and Harald Gröger

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900156

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An enantio- and diastereoselective synthesis of C2-symmetric diols bearing a biphenyl framework has been developed by means of an enzymatic reduction of the corresponding diketones, which were prepared by a Suzuki coupling reaction. Furthermore, a chemoenzymatic one-pot synthesis of a C2-symmetric diol in aqueous media has been realized through combination of the Suzuki coupling reaction and enzymatic reduction.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Synthesis of Optically Active Amines Employing Recombinant ω-Transaminases in E. coli Cells (pages 73–77)

      Dominik Koszelewski, Madeleine Göritzer, Dorina Clay, Birgit Seisser and Wolfgang Kroutil

      Version of Record online: 4 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900220

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Amine feat: Various ω-transaminases from microbial sources were overexpressed in E. coli and the lyophilized cell powder was directly applied for the preparation of optically pure (S)-amines from the corresponding ketones, just consuming ammonia and formate. The optically pure (R)-amines could be obtained by kinetic resolution. A ω-transaminase derived from an Arthrobacter species displayed the highest stereoselectivity in all cases.

    3. Shape- and Size-Specific Chemistry of Ag Nanostructures in Catalytic Ethylene Epoxidation (pages 78–83)

      Phillip Christopher and Suljo Linic

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900231

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Shape and size matter: Catalytic selectivity in ethylene epoxidation is highly sensitive to Ag nanoparticle size and shape. Large catalytic particles with dominant Ag(100) surface facets with low concentrations of undercoordinated sites exhibited the highest selectivity. Catalytic particles of controlled size and shape represent a promising class of materials to study heterogeneous catalytic processes.

    4. Silica-Supported Silver Nanoparticles with Surface Oxygen Species as a Reusable Catalyst for Alkylation of Arenes (pages 84–91)

      Ken-ichi Shimizu, Yuji Miyamoto and Atsushi Satsuma

      Version of Record online: 8 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900226

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Silica-supported silver nanoparticles with surface oxygen atoms act as an effective heterogeneous catalyst for the alkylation of arenes with alcohols and styrenes. Mechanistic studies suggest that the surface oxygen adjacent to the silver surface atoms plays an important role in the rate-limiting dissociation of the α-C[BOND]H bond of alcohol.

    5. Synthesis of Vitamin K1 and K1-Chromanol by Friedel–Crafts Alkylation in Heterogeneous Catalysis (pages 92–97)

      Simona M. Coman, Vasile I. Parvulescu, Stefan Wuttke and Erhard Kemnitz

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900205

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Take your vitamins: The partly hydroxylated MgF2 and AlF3 materials are efficient and selective catalysts for the preparation of two important members of the vitamin K class: vitamin K1 and vitamin K1-chromanol. The acidic properties of these catalysts can be tuned to obtain the target product with high selectivity and yield.

    6. Volcano Relation for the Deacon Process over Transition-Metal Oxides (pages 98–102)

      Felix Studt, Frank Abild-Pedersen, Heine A. Hansen, Isabela C. Man, Jan Rossmeisl and Thomas Bligaard

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900194

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lava applets: DFT calculations are used to establish a volcano relation for the Deacon Process over rutile transition-metal oxides. It is found that RuO2 catalysts are close to the top of the volcano curve, but that there is still room for improvements in the catalytic activity. Importantly, the volcano curve can be based on just one descriptor, the dissociative oxygen chemisorption, which potentially allows for the fast computational screening for new catalysts.

  11. Viewpoints

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Viewpoints
    13. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Biocatalysis: The Outcast (pages 103–107)

      Ruslan Yuryev and Andreas Liese

      Version of Record online: 5 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.200900126

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The black sheep of the family: According to the established classification of catalysis, biocatalysis forms a separate category apart from homogeneous and heterogenous catalysis, yet, in fact, biocatalysis, much like regular chemocatalysis, is also either homogeneous or heterogeneous. This article represents a historical perspective on this dilemma and aims to find a possible way to resolve it.

  12. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Viewpoints
    13. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemCatChem 2/2010 (page 111)

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201090000

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION