ChemCatChem

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 1

January 10, 2011

Volume 3, Issue 1

Pages 1–235

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editorial
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Recent Advances in the Catalytic Conversion of Cellulose (ChemCatChem 1/2011) (page 1)

      Stijn Van de Vyver, Jan Geboers, Prof. Dr. Pierre A. Jacobs and Prof. Dr. Bert F. Sels

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190000

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      The cover picture shows a filmstrip illustrating the bright future of cellulosic biomass as a sustainable feedstock for producing valuable chemicals and biofuels. We are, however, still far away from cost-effective, large-scale catalytic applications and the state-of-the-art is still frequently hampered by the notorious recalcitrance of the polymeric biomolecules. In their Minireview on p. 82 ff., Van de Vyver et al. make an attempt to capture the wide range of recent developments in this area, and they speculate on possible future directions with a primary focus on the role of heterogeneous catalysis.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editorial
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemCatChem 1/2011 (pages 3–13)

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190003

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editorial
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      ChemCatChem: For a Catalytic Future (pages 4–5)

      Dr. Peter Gölitz, Dr. Michael A. Rowan and Dr. David J. Smith

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000433

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editorial
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Preview
    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemCatChem 1/2011 (pages 18–20)

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190001

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editorial
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Preview
    1. Catalytic Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide over Transition Metal Oxides (pages 24–65)

      Dr. Sébastien Royer and Dr. Daniel Duprez

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000378

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      Oxidation into CO2 is a major solution to CO abatement in air depollution treatments. Due to the increasing price of noble metals and to remarkable progresses in oxide syntheses, catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide over oxide catalysts has recently gained in interest. In this Review, the kinetics and mechanism of CO oxidation on single and mixed oxides are examined, alongside the catalyst structures.

  6. Minireviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editorial
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Preview
    1. Overview and Industrial Assessment of Synthesis Strategies towards Zeolites with Mesopores (pages 67–81)

      Robin Chal, Dr. Corine Gérardin, Dr. Metin Bulut and Dr. Sander van Donk

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000158

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      Industrial zeolite and magic: The accessibility of zeolites (see figure) is of paramount importance to capitalize on their effectiveness in industrial catalysis. The variety of synthesis strategies proposed today for the preparation of ‘hierarchical’ zeolite materials combining micro- and mesoporosity is discussed.

    2. Recent Advances in the Catalytic Conversion of Cellulose (pages 82–94)

      Stijn Van de Vyver, Jan Geboers, Prof. Dr. Pierre A. Jacobs and Prof. Dr. Bert F. Sels

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000302

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      Shift happens: Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the environmental problems related to its use have encouraged the development of new catalytic approaches for producing carbon-based chemicals from cellulosic biomass. Here, recent progress in the implementation of (mainly) heterogeneous acid, bifunctional, and multistep catalysis is reviewed.

    3. Prototype Supported Metal Cluster Catalysts: Ir4 and Ir6 (pages 95–107)

      Dr. Alper Uzun, Prof. David A. Dixon and Prof. Bruce C. Gates

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000271

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      Clusterophilia: Iridium offers a range of catalytic properties and forms numerous compounds with small, stable frameworks, including those with a tetrahedral Ir4 framework (see figure) and those with an octahedral Ir6 framework. Supported iridium clusters show catalytic activity in reactions such as ethylene hydrogenation. This Minireview discusses the synthesis, chemistry, and catalytic properties of Ir4 and Ir6 clusters.

  7. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editorial
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Preview
    1. Creating a Biocatalyst for the Production of an Optically Pure Sterically Hindered Amine (pages 109–111)

      Dr. Francesco G. Mutti, Johann Sattler, Katharina Tauber and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Kroutil

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000349

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      Amine for the top: A biocatalyst able to perform transamination of less hindered ketones is modified to transform a sterically demanding ketone substrate to the corresponding optically pure amine. This goal is achieved by rational analysis and design of the catalyst's structure as well as other techniques of directed evolution. The biocatalyst is successfully adapted to the process and not vice versa.

    2. The Role of Metal–Support Bonding in Controlling the Particle Size of Ceria-Supported Transition Metal Catalysts (pages 112–114)

      Dr. N. Raveendran Shiju

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000357

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      Size matters: Particle size is an important factor in determining catalytic activity. The low sintering rate of ceria-supported transition metal particles maintains smaller particle sizes and thereby also catalytic performance. This sintering resistance was recently found to result from strong metal–support interactions with defects and terraces on the ceria surface.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editorial
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Preview
    1. Efficient Catalytic Alkyne Metathesis with a Tri(tert-butoxy)silanolate-Supported Tungsten Benzylidyne Complex (pages 115–118)

      Sergej Lysenko, Birte Haberlag, Dr. Constantin G. Daniliuc, Prof. Dr. Peter G. Jones and Prof. Dr. Matthias Tamm

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000355

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      You can call me alkyne: The tri(tert-butoxy)silanolate-supported tungsten benzylidyne complex [PhC[TRIPLE BOND]W{OSi(OtBu)3}3] efficiently catalyzes alkyne cross-metathesis and ring-closing alkyne metathesis under vacuum-driven or molecular sieve-promoted conditions. The addition of 5 Å molecular sieves boosts the performance of this catalytic system.

    2. Friedel–Crafts Alkylation of Aromatics with Benzyl Alcohol over Gold-Modified Silica (pages 119–121)

      Sarah F. R. Taylor, Jacinto Sá and Prof. Christopher Hardacre

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000337

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      Supports illustrated: Supported gold catalysts are shown to be active and selective for the alkylation of aromatics using benzyl alcohol for the first time. The catalysts are prepared using an ionic liquid deposition method which leads to alkylation reactions, whereas the conventional wet impregnation leads predominantly to oxidation products.

    3. Enantioselective Intramolecular Hydroamination of Secondary Amines Catalyzed by Easily Accessible Ate and Neutral Rare-Earth Complexes (pages 122–126)

      Dr. Clémence Queffelec, Dr. Fabien Boeda, Dr. Annie Pouilhès, Dr. Abdelkrim Meddour, Prof. Cyrille Kouklovsky, Dr. Jérôme Hannedouche, Dr. Jacqueline Collin and Dr. Emmanuelle Schulz

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000323

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      The magnificent neutral: Secondary amines are cyclized into the corresponding scalemic pyrrolidines and piperidines with in situ-prepared chiral alkylamido ate and neutral yttrium and ytterbium catalysts. The enantiomeric excess of 83 % ee is the highest reported value for a rare-earth-promoted hydroamination of a secondary amine.

    4. Plasmon-Driven Selective Oxidation of Aromatic Alcohols to Aldehydes in Water with Recyclable Pt/TiO2 Nanocomposites (pages 127–130)

      Wanying Zhai, Shujie Xue, Anwei Zhu, Yongping Luo and Prof. Yang Tian

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000303

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      Everything's gone green: The selective oxidation of aromatic alcohols to aldehydes has been achieved by use of a green energy source and solvent combination. Solar energy with a recyclable Pt/TiO2 photocatalyst in water at ambient temperature brought about the desired oxidation with high selectivity and relatively long-term stability.

    5. Changing from Symmetric to Asymmetric Simply by Immobilizing the Catalyst on Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle (pages 131–134)

      Dr. Yulin Huang, Dr. Shu Xu and Prof. Dr. Victor S.-Y. Lin

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000294

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      Immobilization for enantioselectivity: Covalent tethering of a rhodium(I) phosphine complex on the surface of highly ordered mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) gives rise to the RhPMSN/(−)- cinchonidine catalytic system, which gives 50 % ee in the hydrogenation of ethyl pyruvate. In contrast, no enantioselectivity is detected in the hydrogenation of ethyl pyruvate catalyzed by the very similar homogeneous system [RhCl(PPh3)3]/(−)-cinchonidine.

    6. Iron-Catalyzed Reductive Aryl–Alkenyl Cross-Coupling Reactions (pages 135–138)

      Dr. Waldemar M. Czaplik, Matthias Mayer and Dr. Axel Jacobi von Wangelin

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000276

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      Direct and to the point: The simple precatalyst system FeCl3/TMEDA has been effectively applied to cross-coupling reactions of various arylmagnesium bromides and alkenyl bromides. With activated aryl bromides and in the absence of polar functional groups, the method can be modified to allow for domino iron-catalyzed magnesiation–cross-coupling reactions.

    7. Direct Evidence of Highly Dispersed Iron in Fe–silicalite: A Raman Spectroscopic Study (pages 139–142)

      Dr. Francesca Bonino , Dr. Alessandro Damin , Andrea Piovano , Prof. Dr. Carlo Lamberti , Prof. Dr. Silvia Bordiga  and Prof. Adriano Zecchina 

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000265

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      Raman knows: UV resonance Raman spectroscopy, performed under a controlled atmosphere, is able to highlight extra-framework iron species, both before and after interaction with NO probe molecule. Furthermore, this work demonstrates that resonance Raman spectra are complementary to those obtained by IR spectroscopy.

    8. Nitrogen-Incorporated TS-1 Zeolite Obtained by Post-Synthetic Nitridation (pages 143–145)

      Dr. Hao Li, Qian Lei, Prof. Dr. Xiaoming Zhang and Prof. Dr. Jishuan Suo

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000258

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      Nitrogen, Inc.: A novel nitrogen-incorporated TS-1 zeolite is prepared by direct calcination of the as-synthesized TS-1 powder in NH3 flow at high temperature. By introducing nitrogen into the framework of TS-1 zeolite, the acidic sites of TS-1 are reduced effectively and the material shows high catalytic activity and stability for epoxidation of propylene with dilute hydrogen peroxide.

    9. Magnetic CuFe2O4 Nanoparticles as an Efficient Catalyst for C[BOND]O Cross-Coupling of Phenols with Aryl Halides (pages 146–149)

      Rongzhao Zhang, Jianming Liu, Shoufeng Wang, Jianzhong Niu, Prof. Dr. Chungu Xia and Prof. Dr. Wei Sun

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000254

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      Ultra magnets: Magnetic CuFe2O4 nanoparticles have been simply prepared and applied as a catalyst in the C[BOND]O cross-coupling of phenols and aryl halides to form diaryl ethers, an important structural motif in many products, industrial polymers, and biologically active compounds. The catalyst is recycled without a significant loss of catalytic activity.

    10. Ethylene Epoxidation Catalyzed by Silver Oxide (pages 150–153)

      M. Olus Özbek, Prof. Dr. Isik Önal and Prof. Dr. Rutger A. van Santen

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000249

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      How bizarre: There are two different reaction paths towards formation of ethylene oxide (EO); in addition to that via an oxometallacycle (OMC) intermediate, silver oxide-catalyzed epoxidation of ethylene with surface oxygen, which can occur on an oxide phase as long as no oxygen vacancies are present, is possible. This path is established computationally, by using density functional theory.

    11. Is Fullerene a Nonmetal Catalyst in the Hydrogenation of Nitrobenzene? (pages 154–156)

      Lucie Pacosová, Christiane Kartusch, Dr. Pavel Kukula and Prof. Dr. Jeroen A. van Bokhoven

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000229

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      Fullerenes (C60and C70) were recently shown to be active in the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene, after activation to form the fullerene anion. However, the catalyst in this reaction is shown to contain residual nickel from the activation of the catalyst, which, as indicated by a series of control experiments, is most likely responsible for the catalytic conversion.

    12. [Cu3(BTC)2]: A Metal–Organic Framework Catalyst for the Friedländer Reaction (pages 157–159)

      Dr. Elena Pérez-Mayoral and Prof. Jiří Čejka

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000201

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      Länder the Fried, home of the MOF: Basolite C 300, a metal–organic framework exhibiting a hard Lewis acid character, is found to be the first efficient MOF catalyst for the Friedländer reaction between 2-aminobenzophenones and acetylacetone under mild reaction conditions, leading to the corresponding quinolines with excellent yields, opening the door towards its utilization for analogous condensations leading to useful biologically active compounds.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editorial
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Preview
    1. Finely Dispersed Au Nanoparticles on SiO2 Achieved by the C60 Additive and Their Catalytic Activity (pages 161–166)

      Kun Qian, Liangfeng Luo, Chuanbao Chen, Prof. Dr. Shangfeng Yang and Prof. Dr. Weixin Huang

      Article first published online: 14 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000342

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      Enhancing the dispersion: Strong Au–C60 interaction with the charge transfer from Au nanoparticles to C60 in Au/C60/SiO2 has been proven to suppress the agglomeration of supported Au nanoparticles and thus enhance their dispersion on SiO2 (see figure). and, consequently, their catalytic activity for CO oxidation has been improved.

    2. Catalytic Hydrogenation Using Abnormal N-Heterocyclic Carbene Palladium Complexes: Catalytic Scope and Mechanistic Insights (pages 167–173)

      Dr. Marion Heckenroth, Vsevolod Khlebnikov, Dr. Antonia Neels, Prof. Dr. Peter Schurtenberger and Prof. Dr. Martin Albrecht

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000270

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      A break from the norm: Abnormally C4-bound N-heterocyclic carbene palladium complexes (see picture) are effective precursors for the catalytic hydrogenation of a variety of olefins. Detailed mechanistic investigations indicate that catalyst activation involves oxidative H2 addition and subsequent imidazolium reductive elimination as pictured, thus providing a heterogeneously operating catalyst.

    3. New Catalytic Materials for the Direct Epoxidation of Propylene by Molecular Oxygen (pages 174–179)

      Anusorn Seubsai, Michael Kahn and Prof. Dr. Selim Senkan

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000248

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      Three is a magic number: Propylene oxide (PO) is an important and versatile intermediate used in the production of a large variety of valuable consumer products. The trimetallic catalyst RuO2–CuOx–NaCl/SiO2 gives PO selectivities of 40–50 % at propylene conversions of 10–20 % in the temperature range 240–270 °C and at atmospheric pressure.

    4. Structural Characteristics, Stability, and Activity of (VO)2P2O7 and VO(PO3)2 Catalysts in p-Cymene Liquid-Phase Oxidation (pages 180–188)

      Dr. Peter R. Makgwane, Dr. Ernst E. Ferg and Prof. Ben Zeelie

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000241

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      Cymene says: The structural characteristics, stability, and activity of (VO)2P2O7 and VO(PO3)2 catalysts under liquid phase p-cymene oxidation reaction are elucidated. The structure of VO(PO3)2 catalyst remains unchanged whereas (VO)2P2O7 undergoes structural transformation during the extended recycling usage, which affects its catalytic performance.

    5. A Novel Synthesis Route for Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 Catalysts used in Methanol Synthesis: Combining Continuous Consecutive Precipitation with Continuous Aging of the Precipitate (pages 189–199)

      Dr. Stefan Kaluza, Dr. Malte Behrens, Dr. Nora Schiefenhövel, Dr. Benjamin Kniep, Dr. Richard Fischer, Prof. Dr. Robert Schlögl and Prof. Dr. Martin Muhler

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000329

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      A novel continuous method for the preparation of a ternary Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for use in methanol synthesis has been developed, and is based on a cascade of micromixers and a tubular aging reactor (see figure). Advantages over the conventional batch process led to an area-related activity about 50 % higher than that of a commercial catalyst.

    6. H2-Induced Reconstruction of Supported Pt Clusters: Metal–Support Interaction versus Surface Hydride (pages 200–207)

      Christophe Mager-Maury, Gaëtan Bonnard, Dr. Céline Chizallet, Dr. Philippe Sautet and Dr. Pascal Raybaud

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000324

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      Fables of the reconstruction: The nature and structure of highly-dispersed metallic clusters on oxide supports strongly depends on the environment. First-principles calculations coupled with thermodynamics show that Pt13 clusters deposited on γ-alumina are very sensitive to H2 pressure. High pressure induces a reconstruction from a biplanar to a cuboctahedral morphology, with formation of a surface hydride.

    7. Full Theoretical Cycle for both Ethene and Propene Formation during Methanol-to-Olefin Conversion in H-ZSM-5 (pages 208–212)

      Dr. David Lesthaeghe, Jeroen Van der Mynsbrugge, Matthias Vandichel, Prof. Dr. Michel Waroquier and Prof. Dr. Veronique Van Speybroeck

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000286

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      For methanol-to-olefin conversion in H-ZSM-5, theoretical simulations provide evidence that the ‘alkene cycle’ offers a viable path to the production of both propene and ethene, in contrast to the failing direct mechanisms. Combined with earlier work on polymethylbenzenes as active hydrocarbon pool molecules, it is clear that, in H-ZSM-5, multiple parallel and interlinked routes operate on a competitive basis.

    8. Lipase Congeners Designed by Genetic Code Engineering (pages 213–221)

      Michael G. Hoesl, Carlos G. Acevedo-Rocha, Sebastian Nehring, Dr. Marina Royter, Dr. Christina Wolschner, Dr. Birgit Wiltschi, Prof. Dr. Nediljko Budisa and Prof. Dr. Garabed Antranikian

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000253

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      Gene genius: Congeners of lipase from Thermoanaerobacter thermohydrosulfuricus containing globally substituted methionine, proline, phenylalanine, and tyrosine with related synthetic analogues (see examples in figure) have special features not found in nature. These features include changes in substrate accessibility and tolerance, as well as optimal temperature, pH, and enzymatic activity profiles.

    9. Selective Phenylacetylene Hydrogenation on a Polymer-Supported Palladium Catalyst Monitored by FTIR Spectroscopy (pages 222–226)

      Wei Liu, Prof. Carlos Otero Arean, Prof. Silvia Bordiga, Dr. Elena Groppo and Prof. Adriano Zecchina

      Article first published online: 14 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000244

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      Plastic fantastic: The possibility of attaining 100 % selectivity in the phenylacetylene hydrogenation reaction (at room temperature) on palladium nanoparticles supported on a porous poly(4-ethylstyrene-co-divinylbenzene) polymer is demonstrated by using in situ FTIR spectroscopy, facilitated by the infrared transparency of the porous polymer support.

    10. Entrapment of Heteropolyacids in Metallic Silver Matrices: Unique Heterogenized Acid Catalysts (pages 227–232)

      Sebastian Krackl, Dr. Anna Company, Dr. Yilmaz Aksu, Prof. Dr. David Avnir and Prof. Dr. Matthias Driess

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000239

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      Caught in a trap: The heteropolyacids H3[P(M3O10)4] (PMA; M=Mo, W) have been successfully entrapped within a metallic silver matrix. They represent the first inorganic-metal PMA@Ag composite catalysts that have been fully characterized by PXRD, SEM, TEM and EDX measurements. The systems show an intriguingly high activity and regioselectivity for the catalytic alkylation of arenes using 1-bromo- and 1-chloroadamantane.

  10. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editorial
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Preview
    1. Model Systems in Catalysis: Single Crystals to Supported Enzyme Mimics. Edited by Robert Rioux (page 233)

      Prof. Jim A. Anderson

      Article first published online: 5 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000394

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      Springer, New York, 2010. 526 pp., hardcover, € 171.15.—ISBN 978-0-387-98041-6

    2. Biocatalysis and Biomolecular Engineering. Edited by Ching T. Hou and Jei-Fu Shaw (page 234)

      Dr. Jan-Karl Guterl

      Article first published online: 5 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000393

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      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2010. 490 pp., hardcover, € 119.00.—ISBN 978-0-470-48759-4

  11. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editorial
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemCatChem 2/2011 (page 235)

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190002

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