ChemCatChem

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 10

October 17, 2011

Volume 3, Issue 10

Pages 1513–1663

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireview
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Reports
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Stereopreferences of Old Yellow Enzymes: Structure Correlations and Sequence Patterns in Enoate Reductases (ChemCatChem 10/2011) (page 1513)

      Dr. Gustav Oberdorfer, Dr. Georg Steinkellner, Dr. Clemens Stueckler, Prof. Kurt Faber and Prof. Karl Gruber

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190041

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In their Communication on p. 1562 ff., K. Gruber et al. describe a structure correlation of active-site loop conformations for Old Yellow Enzymes (OYEs) in combination with their known stereopreferences in the reduction of an aromatic nitroalkene. This revealed three different clusters of OYEs. An analysis of these structural clusters enabled the identification of sequence motifs, which are highly conserved throughout the whole enzyme family. These motifs may be used to predict structural and biocatalytic properties of OYEs. The cover picture shows a schematic representation in which sequences of OYEs are scanned for classification according to the identified sequence motifs. Above the sequences, structures of OYEs illustrating distinct clusters are shown.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireview
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Reports
    11. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemCatChem 10/2011 (pages 1515–1521)

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190042

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireview
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Reports
    11. Preview
  4. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireview
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Reports
    11. Preview
    1. A New Motif for Lewis Base Catalysis: Asymmetric Reduction of β-Enamino Esters (pages 1527–1529)

      Dr. Andreas Weickgenannt and Prof. Dr. Martin Oestreich

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100210

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reduced to the basics: Activation of Lewis acidic Cl3SiH with chiral amide-based Lewis bases allows for the stereocontrolled reduction of several types of β-enamino esters (see scheme). By this, the new motif of α-acetoxy β-enamino esters is transformed into α-hydroxy β-amino acids, a transformation still unknown in transition metal-catalyzed hydrogenation. PMP=4-methoxyphenyl.

  5. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireview
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Reports
    11. Preview
    1. Catalytic Nazarov Cyclization: The State of the Art (pages 1531–1548)

      Tulaza Vaidya, Prof. Richard Eisenberg and Prof. Alison J. Frontier

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100137

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Nazarov reaction has been known for a long time. However, there were only a few catalytic Nazarov reactions reported until the early twenty-first century. Since then, the number of studies employing Nazarov chemistry has expanded considerably, with numerous reports of catalysis addressing synthetic problems associated with this transformation. This manuscript describes developments on catalysis of the Nazarov cyclization and variants thereof since 2005.

  6. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireview
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Reports
    11. Preview
    1. Light-Driven Uncoupling of Nitrogenase Catalysis from ATP Hydrolysis (pages 1549–1555)

      Lauren E. Roth and Prof. Dr. F. Akif Tezcan

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100216

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Illuminating the paths: Biological nitrogen fixation catalyzed by nitrogenase is a possible competition for the Haber–Bosch process to produce ammonia. To shed light on the enzyme- catalyzed reaction, a photosensitizer is attached covalently to the enzyme. This allows for electrons to be directly transferred to the active site of the enzyme, thereby uncoupling substrate reduction from ATP hydrolysis.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireview
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Reports
    11. Preview
    1. The Origin of Regioselectivity in 2-Butanol Dehydration on Solid Acid Catalysts (pages 1557–1561)

      Dr. Ja Hun Kwak, Dr. Roger Rousseau, Dr. Donghai Mei, Dr. Charles H. F. Peden and Dr. János Szanyi

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100173

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It′s a suppressed reaction: Owing to the dispersive forces between the alkyl groups of adsorbed 2-butanol and the catalyst surface, the formation of trans-2-butene is suppressed in the dehydration of 2-butanol on γ-alumina.

    2. Stereopreferences of Old Yellow Enzymes: Structure Correlations and Sequence Patterns in Enoate Reductases (pages 1562–1566)

      Dr. Gustav Oberdorfer, Dr. Georg Steinkellner, Dr. Clemens Stueckler, Prof. Kurt Faber and Prof. Karl Gruber

      Article first published online: 18 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100141

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      From active sites and stereospecificity: Active-site structures of old yellow enzymes (OYEs) are correlated with their stereopreferences in the reduction of an aromatic nitroalkene, which leads to the identification of distinct clusters. These structural clusters are mapped onto sequence space, which yields four characteristic sequence motifs that may be used to cluster OYEs on the basis of their primary structure, as well as to predict their structural and biocatalytic properties.

    3. Iron-Catalyzed Isomerizations of Olefins (pages 1567–1571)

      Dr. Matthias Mayer, Alice Welther and Dr. Axel Jacobi von Wangelin

      Article first published online: 18 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100207

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On the move: A highly practical olefin isomerization protocol under iron catalysis has been developed. The standard conditions involve reaction of the olefin at room temperature in THF with a simple pre-catalyst system. Allylbenzenes give propenylbenzenes; 1-alkenes can be selectively converted to 2-alkenes; isolated dienes give conjugated dienes; (Z)-olefins give (E)-olefins. The synthesis of propenyl-benzenes has also been realized by an iron-catalyzed allylation-isomerization domino reaction in good yields.

    4. Catalytic Properties of Low Oxidation State Iron Complexes in Cross-Coupling Reactions: Anthracene Iron(−I) Complexes as Competent Catalysts (pages 1572–1577)

      Katharina Weber, Eva-Maria Schnöckelborg and Prof. Dr. Robert Wolf

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100199

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catalyzing cross couplings: The catalytic activity of well-defined low-valent iron complexes in cross-coupling reactions has been investigated. The results show that labile ligands in the catalyst precursor are beneficial for high catalytic activity. Thus, anionic iron(−I) complexes with labile anthracene ligands are competent precatalysts for cross couplings that involve alkyl, aryl, and alkenyl electrophiles.

    5. Platinum Nanoparticles Supported on Nitrogen-doped Carbon Nanofibers as Efficient Poisoning Catalysts for the Hydrogenation of Nitroarenes (pages 1578–1581)

      Dr. Yukihiro Motoyama, Youngjin Lee, Keita Tsuji, Prof. Dr. Seong-Ho Yoon, Prof. Dr. Isao Mochida and Prof. Dr. Hideo Nagashima

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100135

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Platinum nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNF-H) are synthesized by thermally decomposing [Pt(dba)2] (dba=dibenzylideneacetone) in the presence of N-CNF-H and act as reusable poisoning catalysts for the nitro-selective hydrogenation of functionalized nitroarenes to the corresponding anilines and N-aryl hydroxylamines.

    6. Nickel-Catalyzed Hydrodefluorination of Fluoroarenes and Trifluorotoluenes with Superhydride (Lithium Triethylborohydride) (pages 1582–1586)

      Jingjing Wu and Prof. Song Cao

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100083

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Superkiller of C[BOND]F bonds: Two new LiEt3BH/Ni-based catalyst systems for the hydrodefluorination (HDF) of fluoroarenes and trifluorotoluenes were reported. Both fluoroarenes and trifluorotoluenes were reduced to the corresponding arenes and toluenes in excellent yields with LiEt3BH in the presence of 40 % NiCl2, whereas a catalytic amount of NiCl2(PCy3)2 (typically 5 mol %) along with LiEt3BH exhibited high activity and selectivity in the HDF of fluoroarenes and was inert to trifluorotoluenes.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireview
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Reports
    11. Preview
    1. S-Selective Mixed Carboligation by Structure-Based Design of the Pyruvate Decarboxylase from Acetobacter pasteurianus (pages 1587–1596)

      Dr. Dörte Rother (neé Gocke), Dr. Geraldine Kolter, Tina Gerhards, Dr. Catrine L. Berthold, Dr. Ekaterina Gauchenova, Dr. Michael Knoll, Prof. Jürgen Pleiss, Prof. Michael Müller, Prof. Gunter Schneider and Prof. Martina Pohl

      Article first published online: 31 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100054

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mixed carboligation: A new biocatalytic access to (S)-phenylacetylcarbinol derivatives by carboligation of aldehydes is opened by using an active-site variant of pyruvate decarboxylase from Acetobacter pasteurianus.

    2. Synthesis of MoVTeNb Oxide Catalysts with Tunable Particle Dimensions (pages 1597–1606)

      Dr. Yury V. Kolen'ko, Dr. Wei Zhang, Dr. Raoul Naumann d'Alnoncourt, Dr. Frank Girgsdies, Dr. Thomas W. Hansen, Till Wolfram, Prof. Robert Schlögl and Dr. Annette Trunschke

      Article first published online: 29 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100089

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Purebred catalyst: We report three viable solution-based methods to prepare phase-pure MoVTeNb oxide catalysts with M1 structure (ICSD 55097). The particle size and morphology of M1 can be tailored by applying these methods. Detailed characterization results reveal M1 crystals on the sub-micrometer and nanometer scale, depending on the method. However, our catalytic data indicate that activation of propane over M1 is insensitive to morphologies.

    3. Tailoring the Activity for Oxygen Evolution Electrocatalysis on Rutile TiO2(110) by Transition-Metal Substitution (pages 1607–1611)

      Dr. Mónica García-Mota, Dr. Aleksandra Vojvodic, Prof. Horia Metiu, Dr. Isabela C. Man, Hai-Yan Su, Prof. Jan Rossmeisl and Prof. Jens K. Nørskov

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100160

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Save the prize: The activity of doped TiO2 toward oxygen evolution reaction is found to be considerably enhanced as compared to that of TiO2. Given that TiO2 is extremely cheap, some of the systems considered here serve as candidates for inexpensive alternatives to the expensive RuO2 catalyst.

    4. Au on Nanosized NiO: A Cooperative Effect between Au and Nanosized NiO in the Base-Free Alcohol Oxidation (pages 1612–1618)

      Dr. Alberto Villa, Dr. Carine E. Chan-Thaw, Dr. Gabriel M. Veith, Dr. Karren L. More, Dr. Davide Ferri and Prof. Laura Prati

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100161

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Au on nanosized NiO: Reducing the size of the NiO support material to nanosize results in an order of magnitude increase in the catalytic liquid phase oxidation reactivity of supported gold particles. The origin of this effect is attributed to changes in the electronic structure and support chemistry, which are optimized in situ.

    5. Gold and Copper Nanoparticles Supported on Cerium(IV) Oxide—A Photocatalyst Mineralizing Organic Acids under Red Light Irradiation (pages 1619–1623)

      Atsuhiro Tanaka, Dr. Keiji Hashimoto and Dr. Hiroshi Kominami

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100158

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Under red light: Au and Cu nanoparticles supported on CeO2 powder showed strong absorption at around λ=620 nm attributed to the surface plasmon resonance of Cu-Au nanoparticles and exhibited a higher level of activity than that of Au/CeO2 in the mineralization of organic acids in aqueous suspensions under irradiation with red light. The apparent quantum efficiency reached 7.5 % at λ=625 nm and 5.2 % even at λ=700 nm.

    6. Facile Hydrogenation of Ketones Catalyzed by Platinum on Carbon under Ordinary Pressures and Temperatures (pages 1624–1628)

      Dr. Yuta Fujiwara, Youhei Iwasaki, Dr. Tomohiro Maegawa, Dr. Yasunari Monguchi and Prof. Dr. Hironao Sajiki

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100151

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The versatility of effortlessness: The hydrogenation of aliphatic and aromatic ketones under mild reaction conditions is established. The method is highly efficient for the hydrogenation of aliphatic ketones, even including sterically hindered and highly strained ketones, under mild conditions. In addition, the selective hydrogenation of the carbonyl group of aromatic ketones is achieved with the aromatic nuclei and the resulting secondary benzyl alcohol moiety still intact.

    7. Galvanic Deposition of Au on Paperlike Cu Fiber for High-Efficiency, Low-Temperature Gas-Phase Oxidation of Alcohols (pages 1629–1636)

      Guofeng Zhao, Huanyun Hu, Miaomiao Deng and Prof. Dr. Yong Lu

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100138

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Golden times: A microfibrous-structured Au catalyst is successfully obtained by performing galvanic deposition of Au on a thin-sheet sinter-locked 8 μm diameter Cu fiber. This new catalyst, with excellent heat conductivity, shows a remarkable low-temperature activity for gas-phase selective oxidation of several typical alcohols. A synergistic effect between AuCu alloy and Cu2O formed in situ during the reaction drives, by nature, the reaction toward completion (see figure).

    8. Tuning of Active Sites in Ni[BOND]Nb[BOND]O Catalysts for the Direct Conversion of Ethane to Acetonitrile or Ethylene (pages 1637–1645)

      Dr. Fernando Rubio-Marcos, Dr. Elizabeth Rojas, Dr. Ricardo López-Medina, Dr. M. Olga Guerrero-Pérez, Prof. Dr. Miguel A. Bañares and Prof. Dr. José F. Fernandez

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100115

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spreading the activity: The results of this study demonstrate that NiO nanoparticles are active for ethane activation and that their catalytic performance can be modulated through the use of the appropriate support. These nanoparticles are dispersed on the surface of two different Nb2O5 materials by using a novel dry nanodispersion method. The catalysts obtained by the proposed route are promising catalytic materials for the ethane ammoxidation.

    9. Mechanism of Side Reactions in Alkane C[BOND]H Bond Functionalization by Diazo Compounds Catalyzed by Ag and Cu Homoscorpionate Complexes—A DFT Study (pages 1646–1652)

      Dr. Ataualpa A. C. Braga, Dr. Ana Caballero, Dr. Juan Urbano, Dr. M. Mar Diaz-Requejo, Prof. Dr. Pedro J. Pérez and Prof. Dr. Feliu Maseras

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100082

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      DFT studies reveal that the generation of fumarate and/or maleate dimers as nondesired products during the catalytic functionalization of alkanes by carbene insertion from diazo compounds occurs through a metallocarbene–diazo compound interaction. The calculations predict the necessary catalyst-to-diazo ratio to minimize the formation of such side products.

    10. New Promising Iridium Catalyst for Toluene Hydrogenation (pages 1653–1658)

      Dr. Michał Zieliński, Dr. Mariusz Pietrowski and Prof. Maria Wojciechowska

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100061

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Toluene hydrogenation: The use of magnesium fluoride as a support for iridium has allowed us to obtain new catalysts that are highly active in the toluene hydrogenation reaction. Activities of the Ir/MgF2 catalysts are much higher than those of the catalysts supported on commercial Al2O3.

  9. Conference Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireview
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Reports
    11. Preview
    1. The German Catalyst for Success: Weimar (pages 1659–1660)

      Dr. Robert Güttel, Andreas Dumrath and Prof. Dr. Andreas Jentys

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100165

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catalysis, an old and new German classic: In March 2011, the German Catalysis Society in collaboration with the Reaction Technology Society held their annual meeting together for the first time. This meeting was held together with the intention of increasing the bond between the scientific communities of catalysis and reaction engineering.

    2. Frontiers in Catalysis and Energy Science (pages 1661–1662)

      Dr. Franklin (Feng) Tao, Dr. Miquel Salmeron, Dr. José Rodriguez and Dr. Jun Hu

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100163

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catalysis from within and from without: The conference report from the spring meeting of the Materials Research Society on Surfaces and Nanomaterials for Catalysis. Cutting edge in situ and ex situ studies were presented.

  10. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Minireview
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Conference Reports
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemCatChem 11/2011 (page 1663)

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190044

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION