ChemCatChem

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 3

Special Issue: Catalysis for New Energy Technologies

March 7, 2011

Volume 3, Issue 3

Pages 421–615

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Towards an Efficient Hydrogen Production from Biomass: A Review of Processes and Materials (ChemCatChem 3/2011) (page 421)

      Prof. De Chen and Dr. Li He

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190008

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      The cover picture shows an efficient process of the one-stage hydrogen production by integrating in situ CO2 removal into catalytic reactions in processing biomass-related chemicals. Besides the advantage in increasing hydrogen yield and purity, it opens great opportunities for using various feedstocks derived from biomass, easy CO2 sequestration, simple process layout, and efficient energy utilization. In their Review on p. 490 ff., De Chen et al. provide an up-to-date analysis of the main approaches in the conversion of biomass-related feedstocks to hydrogen. They suggest the possible directions with a primary focus on the integration of in situ CO2 capture into the conversion processes. The challenges in selective C[BOND]C bond activation and the suppression of the severe thermal decomposition of most biomass-related feedstocks were also addressed.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Biofuel cells Based on the Immobilization of Photosynthetically Active Bioentities (ChemCatChem 3/2011) (page 422)

      Dr. Christophe F. Meunier, Dr. Xiao-Yu Yang, Dr. Joanna C. Rooke and Prof. Bao-Lian Su

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190009

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      Natural photosynthesis is a highly efficient process that uses sunlight irradiation to convert carbon dioxide into value-added biomass. The Review by p. 476 ff., Bao-Lian Su et al. summarizes the recent advances in the transformation of solar energy into electrical power, as represented here on the Inside Cover, through the exploitation of photosynthetically active proteins, organelles, and living cells.

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      A Current Perspective on Catalysis for New Energy Technologies (pages 423–425)

      Prof. De Chen and Prof. Chang-Jun Liu

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100046

  4. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemCatChem 3/2011 (pages 427–431)

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190010

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
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    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemCatChem 3/2011 (pages 436–438)

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190011

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from Heavy Hydrocarbons (pages 440–457)

      Dr. Rufino. M. Navarro Yerga, Dr.  M. Consuelo Álvarez-Galván, Noelia Mota, Dr. Jose A. Villoria de la Mano, Dr.  Saeed M. Al-Zahrani and Prof. Jose L. G. Fierro

      Article first published online: 8 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000315

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      More than a fueling: Logistic fuels are multicomponent mixtures containing a large number of hydrocarbons. The lack of widely available sources of hydrogen dictates the use of logistic hydrocarbons as a way to facilitate the introduction of hydrogen in energy systems. This article reports on recent investigations related to the reforming of fuels for hydrogen production, with regard to catalyst designs and the challenges that need to be addressed.

    2. Solar Fuel Production Based on the Artificial Photosynthesis System (pages 458–474)

      Dr. Yutaka Amao

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000293

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      My kingdom for a catalyst: Artificial photosynthesis systems consisting of an electron donor, a photosensitizer, an electron carrier, and a catalyst for hydrogen production or CO2 reduction for solar low carbon fuels, such as hydrogen gas, CO, formic acid, and methanol production are introduced.

    3. Biofuel cells Based on the Immobilization of Photosynthetically Active Bioentities (pages 476–488)

      Dr. Christophe F. Meunier, Dr. Xiao-Yu Yang, Dr. Joanna C. Rooke and Prof. Bao-Lian Su

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000410

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Green design: Natural photosynthesis is a highly efficient process that uses sunlight irradiation to convert carbon dioxide into value-added biomass. This review summarizes the recent advances in the transformation of solar energy into electrical power through the exploitation of photosynthetically active proteins, organelles, and living cells.

    4. Towards an Efficient Hydrogen Production from Biomass: A Review of Processes and Materials (pages 490–511)

      Prof. De Chen and Dr. Li He

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000345

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      The future is bright the future is bio: Sorption enhanced reforming is a remarkably flexible process in terms of feedstock composition (see figure), owing to its low coking potential. It has a great potential to produce a high concentration of hydrogen in a single stage.

  7. Minireviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. An Insight into Artificial Leaves for Sustainable Energy Inspired by Natural Photosynthesis (pages 513–528)

      Dr. Han Zhou, Prof. Tongxiang Fan and Prof. Di Zhang

      Article first published online: 27 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000266

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      Leaf the light on: Constructing artificial leaves by mimicking photosynthesis to capture solar energy to catalytically produce hydrogen and oxygen from water and various environmentally clean fuels from atmospheric carbon dioxide is of high significance. Major advances in this research area are highlighted in this Minireview and some successful prototypes from natural systems that can be used for the biomimetic design of artificial leaves are particularly emphasized.

    2. Progresses in the Preparation of Coke Resistant Ni-based Catalyst for Steam and CO2 Reforming of Methane (pages 529–541)

      Prof. Chang-jun Liu, Jingyun Ye, Jiaojun Jiang and Dr. Yunxiang Pan

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000358

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      Coke is it! There has been very recent progress in the design, synthesis and characterization of coke resistant Ni catalysts for steam and CO2 reforming of methane, and advances in the use of promoters and supporting materials, in preparation methods and in theoretical studies have lead to increased efficiency

    3. Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis over Molecular Sieve Supported Catalysts (pages 542–550)

      Bo Sun, Prof. Dr. Minghua Qiao, Prof. Kangnian Fan, Jeffrey Ulrich and Prof. Dr. Franklin (Feng) Tao

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000352

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      Converting syngas to transportation fuels: The synergistic effect between the metal and the molecular sieve in Fischer–Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is ideal for converting syngas to transportation fuels through hydrogenation, isomerization, and cracking.

    4. Surface Science Studies on Cobalt Fischer–Tropsch Catalysts (pages 551–559)

      Zhou-jun Wang, Dr. Zhen Yan, Prof. Chang-jun Liu and Prof.  D. W. Goodman

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000319

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      Approaching “reality”: In the last decades, model catalysts were well developed and applied in surface science study for different reactions. In this Minireview, we briefly summarize the state-of-the-art surface science studies on cobalt model catalysts in Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis. The devised model catalysts start from the simplest case, single crystal, to more complex one, Co nanoparticles dispersed on model support (see figure).

  8. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Metabolon Catalysts: An Efficient Model for Multi-enzyme Cascades at Electrode Surfaces (pages 561–570)

      Michael J. Moehlenbrock, Timothy K. Toby, Lindsey N. Pelster and Prof. Shelley D. Minteer

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000384

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      Highway for biofuel cell development: The interactions between sequential enzymes of metabolic pathways, termed metabolons, induce substrate channeling and can result in increased efficiency. This phenomenon may have direct implication in the advancement of multi-enzyme enzymatic biofuel cells, through the use of super-complex formations, as bioanode catalysts.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Photocatalytic Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in Water by Ruthenium Complexes (pages 571–573)

      Dr. Diganta Kalita, Bhasker Radaram, Brandon Brooks, Pooja Priyanka Kannam and Prof. Xuan Zhao

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000335

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      Reactions in the sun: A simple homogeneous photocatalytic system for the oxidation of organic substrates that consists of RuII-H2O complex as catalyst, [Ru(bpy)3]2+ as photosensitizer, and [Co(NH3)5Cl]2+ as electron acceptor, can efficiently and selectively catalyze the oxidation of alkene and alcohols in water by using sunlight as the driving force (see scheme).

    2. Nanostructured Cu/TiO2 Photocatalysts for H2 Production from Ethanol and Glycerol Aqueous Solutions. (pages 574–577)

      Dr. Tiziano Montini, Dr. Valentina Gombac, Dr. Laura Sordelli, Dr. Juan José Delgado, Dr. Xiaowei Chen, Prof. Dr. Gianpiero Adami and Prof. Dr. Paolo Fornasiero

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000289

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      Valorization of chemicals: The Cu photodeposited on pure anatase or multi-phase TiO2 leads to the formation of nanostructured visible-light driven photocatalysts (see figure), which are active in the valorization of ethanol or glycerol.

    3. Promoting Low-Temperature Hydrogenation of C[DOUBLE BOND]O Bonds of Acetone and Acetaldehyde by using Co–Pt Bimetallic Catalysts (pages 578–581)

      Renyang Zheng, Prof. Dr. Yuexiang Zhu and Prof. Dr. Jingguang G. Chen

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000268

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      Dividing the flow: The Co–Pt bimetallic catalyst (see figure) exhibits higher C[DOUBLE BOND]O hydrogenation activity than the corresponding monometallic catalysts from batch and flow reactor studies. DFT calculations reveal that the binding energies of the carbonyl compounds correlate well with the hydrogenation activity.

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. Nanoengineered PtVFe/C Cathode Electrocatalysts in PEM Fuel Cells: Catalyst Activity and Stability (pages 583–593)

      Bin Fang, Dr. Jin Luo, Prof. Dr. Yongsheng Chen, Bridgid N. Wanjala, Rameshwori Loukrakpam, Dr. Jian Hong, Jun Yin, Xiang Hu, Peipei Hu and Prof. Dr. Chuan-Jian Zhong

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000316

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      The PEM is mightier than the sword: Structural and compositional changes of trimetallic PtVFe/C catalysts are investigated, alongside their electrochemistry and fuel-cell performance, to provide an insight into the stability of base metals incorporated into the multimetallic systems for use in proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel-cell electrocatalysts. The changes thus elucidated correlate with the structure, activity, and stability of the catalysts.

    2. Biodiesel-Like Biofuels from Simultaneous Transesterification/Esterification of Waste Oils with a Biomass-Derived Solid Acid Catalyst (pages 594–597)

      Dr. Rafael Luque and Prof. James H. Clark

      Article first published online: 14 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000280

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      Fueling good: Biodiesel-like biofuels are prepared from waste oils by using as catalysts a family of acidic mesoporous carbonaceous materials denoted as starbon acids under both conventional heating and microwave irradiation. The solid acids are found to catalyze both the esterification of the free fatty acids in the waste oil with methanol and the transesterification of the triglycerides in the oil to give biodiesel and glycerol.

    3. Nickel-Loaded Zirconia Catalysts with Large Specific Surface Area for High-Temperature Catalytic Applications (pages 598–606)

      Andreas Peters, Dr. Fatemeh Nouroozi, Dennis Richter, Dr. Michal Lutecki and Prof. Dr. Roger Gläser

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000277

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      Surface provider: Highly porous and thermally stable zirconia is prepared by a template-assisted route and post-treatment in ammonia solution. The high specific surface area results from the incorporation of silicon dissolved from the glass vessels during the post-treatment. The Ni-loaded zirconia is an active and selective catalyst in the dry reforming of methane with CO2 to hydrogen as an energy carrier at 750 °C, giving methane conversions up to 79 % and H2 selectivities up to 87 %.

    4. An Atomic-Scale View of Palladium Alloys and their Ability to Dissociate Molecular Hydrogen (pages 607–614)

      Ashleigh E. Baber, Heather L. Tierney, Timothy J. Lawton and Prof. E. Charles H. Sykes

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000309

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      Coming attractions: Atomic-scale imaging is used to elucidate the composition and geometry of catalytically important Pd alloy surfaces. Ensembles responsible for hydrogen dissociation are identified along with a new hydrogen-induced 2D PdH phase that results from the transport of Pd atoms to sites on top of the surface.

  11. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Reviews
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemCatChem 4/2011 (page 615)

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190012

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