ChemCatChem

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 7

July 11, 2011

Volume 3, Issue 7

Pages 1085–1215

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Universality in Oxygen Evolution Electrocatalysis on Oxide Surfaces (ChemCatChem 7/2011) (page 1085)

      Isabela C. Man, Hai-Yan Su, Federico Calle-Vallejo, Dr. Heine A. Hansen, Dr. José I. Martínez, Nilay G. Inoglu, Prof. John Kitchin, Prof. Thomas F. Jaramillo, Prof. Jens K. Nørskov and Jan Rossmeisl

      Version of Record online: 30 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190027

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows an electrolysis cell for converting electricity into chemical energy in terms of hydrogen. The anode catalysis, where the oxygen evolution reaction takes place, is responsible for the main part of the total overpotential, limiting the efficiency of electrolysis. Based on density functional simulations a universal limitation for the oxygen evolution reaction is established, which is independent of the catalyst material. The resulting activity volcano is shown on the cover. In their VIP Full Paper on p. 1159 ff., Rossmeisl et al. report that the trends in the predicted electrocatalytic activity compare well with experiments from the literature. This comparison is also indicated on the cover.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Selective Debenzylation of Benzyl Protected Groups with SiliaCat Pd(0) under Mild Conditions (ChemCatChem 7/2011) (page 1086)

      Dr. Valerica Pandarus, Dr. François Béland, Dr. Rosaria Ciriminna and Dr. Mario Pagliaro

      Version of Record online: 30 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190028

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      The inside cover cover picture shows the SiliaCat Pd(0) debenzylation catalyst in action. In their Communication on p. 1146 ff., F. Béland, M. Pagliaro et al. describe how benzyl-protected sugars, aminoacids, ethers, and esters are smoothly debenzylated under 0.1 MPa H2 at room temperature using modest amounts (1–2 mol%) of their newly developed catalyst. The latter sol–gel material is a versatile and leach-proof catalyst material that can be recycled and reused with no loss in activity of the entrapped Pd nanocrystals.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Recent Advances in Amine Synthesis by Catalytic Hydroaminomethylation of Alkenes (pages 1102–1118)

      Delphine Crozet, Prof. Martine Urrutigoïty and Prof. Philippe Kalck

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000411

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      Chemical elegance: The hydroaminomethylation reaction is an elegant way to produce in a one pot sequence nitrogen compounds from alkenes, carbon monoxide, dihydrogen, and amines. The challenge of this reaction is to combine the highest chemo- and regioselectivity to efficiently obtain the corresponding amines. This review focuses on the considerable advances recently reported.

  6. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Transforming Amorphous into Crystalline Carbon: Observing How Graphene Grows (pages 1119–1120)

      Prof. Dr. Jörg J. Schneider

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100078

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      How does your graphene grow? A combination of thermal and electron beam induced experiments coupled with in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and spectroscopy techniques allow insight into the transformation of amorphous carbon into few layer graphene. Besides shining light on fundamental aspects of graphene growth, the high-lighted work by Banhart and colleagues might have interesting implications for future direction of synthetic graphene growth.

    2. Heterogeneous π-Acid Catalysis with Metal Nanoparticles (pages 1121–1125)

      Dr. Nitin T. Patil

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100029

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      Kick-starting a new journey with metal NPs: For π-acid catalysis, a journey from homogeneous to heterogeneous reactions has begun. Metal nanoparticles supported on metal oxides or monodispersed nanoparticles are reported to exhibit significant electrophilic character in C[BOND]C bond activation enabling reactions, which, to date, have been catalyzed under homogeneous metal catalysis.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Recyclable Copper Catalyst for meta-Selective C[BOND]H Bond Arylation (pages 1127–1129)

      Eun Young Lee and Prof. Jaiwook Park

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100072

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      It's a fair cop guvner: The meta-selective arylation of various anilides with diaryliodonium triflates was achieved by using copper oxide nanoparticles imbedded in aluminum oxyhydroxide, Cu/AlO(OH). The copper catalyst is much more reactive than homogeneous CuI and CuII catalysts; it is also recyclable.

    2. Fate of Brønsted Acid Sites and Benzene-Based Carbenium Ions During Methanol-to-Olefin Conversion on SAPO-34 (pages 1130–1133)

      Weili Dai, Matthias Scheibe, Prof. Dr. Naijia Guan, Dr. Landong Li and Prof. Dr. Michael Hunger

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100059

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      High on speed: Brønsted acid sites and polyalkylbenzenium ions on SAPO-34 applied as catalyst for the methanol-to-olefin conversion for different times-on-stream were investigated by using a method consisting of ammonia adsorption and 1H high-speed MAS NMR spectroscopy. The selectivity of SAPO-34 to light olefins correlates with the number of accessible Si(OH)Al groups and polyalkylbenzenium ions.

    3. Catalytic Alkylation Routes via Carbonium-Ion-Like Transition States on Acidic Zeolites (pages 1134–1138)

      Rajamani Gounder and Prof. Enrique Iglesia

      Version of Record online: 5 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100051

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      Zeolites going crackers: Brønsted acid sites in zeolites (H-FER, H-MFI, H-MOR) catalyze CH4-alkene reactions at high temperatures (>700 K) via carbonium-ion-like transition states. The ratio of rate constants for forward and reverse reactions (alkane alkylation-cracking, alkene dimerization-cracking) equal their respective equilibrium constants (KR). In contrast, relative rates of CH4 and alkene reactions with a given alkoxide are influenced by the local environment around acid sites.

    4. Methylaluminoxane as an Alternative for BArF in the Iridium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Imines (pages 1139–1142)

      Dr. Nataša Mršić, Dr. Lavinia Panella, Edwin G. IJpeij, Prof. Dr. Adriaan J. Minnaard, Prof. Dr. Ben L. Feringa and Prof. Dr. Johannes G. de Vries

      Version of Record online: 5 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100008

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      An ionic revolution? BArF has been the anion of choice for iridium-catalyzed imine hydrogenation; however, for large-scale production its use may be too costly. Methylaluminoxane (MAO) can be used instead in conjunction with [{Ir(COD)Cl}2], although enantioselectivities are somewhat lower than with BArF if 50–500 eq. of MAO are used.

    5. MoVNbTe Mixed Oxides as Efficient Catalyst for Selective Oxidation of Ethanol to Acetic Acid (pages 1143–1145)

      Dr. Vladimir I. Sobolev and Prof. Konstantin Y. Koltunov

      Version of Record online: 30 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000450

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      In the mix with metals: Multi-component MoVNbTe mixed oxides, in contrast to three-component MoVNb and MoVTe oxides show exclusive efficiency in selective oxidation of ethanol by molecular oxygen to obtain acetic acid.

    6. Selective Debenzylation of Benzyl Protected Groups with SiliaCat Pd(0) under Mild Conditions (pages 1146–1150)

      Dr. Valerica Pandarus, Dr. François Béland, Dr. Rosaria Ciriminna and Dr. Mario Pagliaro

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000420

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A catalyst in the crowd: The selective debenzylation of aryl benzyl ethers, benzyl esters, and benzyl amines leaving other sensitive groups intact can be carried out in high yield under remarkably mild conditions [0.1 MPa (1 bar), H2 at room temperature] over a new series of recyclable palladium(0) heterogeneous catalysts.

    7. Peroxidase-Like Activity of Cupric Oxide Nanoparticle (pages 1151–1154)

      Prof. Wei Chen, Juan Chen, Prof. Ai-Lin Liu, Li-Man Wang, Guang-Wen Li and Prof. Xin-Hua Lin

      Version of Record online: 7 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100064

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      It′s a mummers catalyst: Upon the addition of cupric oxide nanoparticles to the peroxidase substrate TMB in the presence of H2O2, a blue color product can be formed with a maximum absorbance at λ=652 nm, indicating that cupric oxide nanoparticles have peroxidase-like catalytic activity.

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      Heterogeneously Catalyzed Continuous-Flow Hydrogenation Using Segmented Flow in Capillary Columns (pages 1155–1157)

      Jasper J. W. Bakker, Dr. Martijn M. P. Zieverink, Raf W. E. G. Reintjens, Prof. Dr. Freek Kapteijn, Prof. Dr. Jacob A. Moulijn and Prof. Dr. Michiel T. Kreutzer

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100044

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      Caterpillar catalysis: Segmented flow in standard GC capillary columns, with a heterogeneous Pd catalyst on the walls, gave rapid information about catalytic processes in them. The residence time and conversion was monitored visually, greatly simplifying bench-scale optimization. Examples show the benefits of the elimination of pore diffusion and axial dispersion. Further, we demonstrated how to quickly identify deactivating species in multistep synthesis without intermediate workup.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. Universality in Oxygen Evolution Electrocatalysis on Oxide Surfaces (pages 1159–1165)

      Isabela C. Man, Hai-Yan Su, Federico Calle-Vallejo, Dr. Heine A. Hansen, Dr. José I. Martínez, Nilay G. Inoglu, Prof. John Kitchin, Prof. Thomas F. Jaramillo, Prof. Jens K. Nørskov and Jan Rossmeisl

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000397

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      HOOt-n-HOller: Based on the scaling relations between HO* and HOO* species and on the constant difference of 3.2 eV between the two levels, theoretical overpotential trends towards oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are reported for a wide range of oxides including rutile, perovskites, spinel rock salt, and bixbyte. The theoretical and experimental trends agree. Comparing 3.2 eV with the ideal value of 2.46 eV indicates that limitations exist for OER on oxide-based electrocatalysts.

    2. Mechanism and Site Requirements of Thiophene Hydrodesulfurization Catalyzed by Supported Pt Clusters (pages 1166–1175)

      Dr. Huamin Wang and Prof. Enrique Iglesia

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100027

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      All aboard the cluster train: Sulfur vacancies on Pt cluster surfaces are required for kinetically relevant steps in thiophene desulfurization and hydrogenation. Turnover rates increase with increasing Pt cluster size and are higher on Pt than on Ru clusters because weaker metal–sulfur bonds favor vacancy formation during catalytic cycles, the density of which depends on sulfur chemical potentials set by temperature and H2S/H2 ratios.

    3. Mechanism of the Catalytic Oxidation of Glycerol on Polycrystalline Gold and Platinum Electrodes (pages 1176–1185)

      Youngkook Kwon, Klaas Jan P. Schouten and Prof. Marc T. M. Koper

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100023

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      Oh! Let me see! Glycerol electro-oxidation mechanism on Au and Pt electrodes under different pH conditions was investigated by applying a new high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for studying the dissolved reaction products and by using online mass spectrometry (OLEMS) for detecting CO2. Both the activity and product distributions of glycerol oxidation are strongly dependent on pH and catalyst; however, the general reaction pathways do not change.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: Mechanism of the Catalytic Oxidation of Glycerol on Polycrystalline Gold and Platinum Electrodes

      Vol. 4, Issue 11, 1697, Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2012

    4. Low-Valent Molybdenum-Based Dual Pre-Catalysts for Highly Efficient Catalytic Epoxidation of Alkenes and Deoxygenation of Sulfoxides (pages 1186–1192)

      Sebastian Krackl, Dr. Anna Company, Dr. Stephan Enthaler and Prof. Dr. Matthias Driess

      Version of Record online: 7 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100007

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      Molybdenum, the hero: A series of triply bonded dimolybdenum(III) hexaalkoxides were tested as pre-catalysts in olefin epoxidation and sulfoxide deoxygenation. The complexes exhibited high performance in both types of reactions. For example, in the catalytic epoxidation of cyclooctene, turnover frequencies of above 60 000 h−1 were achieved at elevated temperatures (≈50 °C). In general, their activities are very high, surpassing those previously reported for other molybdenum-based catalysts in analogous transformations.

    5. Lanthanum Oxide Supported on Carbon Nanofibers as Solid Base Catalysts (pages 1193–1199)

      Dr. Anne Mette Frey, Dr. Johannes Hendrik Bitter and Prof. Dr. Krijn Pieter de Jong

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Keeping active on the nanoscale: La2O3 nanoparticles (≈4 nm) on a carbon nanofiber support are successfully prepared. These supported systems are an order of magnitude more active for the self-condensation of acetone compared to bulk materials.

    6. Development of a Whole Cell Biocatalyst for the Efficient Prenylation of Indole Derivatives by Autodisplay of the Aromatic Prenyltransferase FgaPT2 (pages 1200–1207)

      Eva Kranen, Dr. Nicola Steffan, Dr. Ruth Maas, Prof. Dr. Shu-Ming Li and Prof. Dr. Joachim Jose

      Version of Record online: 30 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000429

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      Enzymes on a bug: The Autodisplay-mediated surface display of a dimeric prenyltransferase provides simple access to the enzyme, which is laborious to purify. With improved stability of the surface-displayed enzyme, and the possibility to easily reuse the whole cell biocatalyst, the biocatalytic potential of enzyme-Autodisplay is shown.

    7. A Homogeneous Mixture Composed of Vanadate, Acid, and TEMPO Functionalized Ionic Liquids for Alcohol Oxidation by H2O2 (pages 1208–1213)

      Sa-Sa Wang, Prof. Zora Popović, Prof. Hai-Hong Wu and Prof. Ye Liu

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000401

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      It′s cocktail hour: The ionic liquid compositions (ILCs) composed of 1, 2, 3, and [Bpy]BF4 proved to be an efficient catalytic system for the oxidation of a wide range of alcohols by H2O2. With the aid of 2 and 3, 1 in [Bpy]BF4 could be recycled for six runs without loss in activity. The role of 2 was to promote the formation of the active peroxo VV species, which are responsible for substrate activation. The role of 3 was in the regeneration of 1.

  9. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemCatChem 8/2011 (page 1215)

      Version of Record online: 30 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190031

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