ChemCatChem

Cover image for ChemCatChem

August 8, 2011

Volume 3, Issue 8

Pages 1217–1367

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Flame Aerosol Synthesis of Metal Oxide Catalysts with Unprecedented Structural and Catalytic Properties (ChemCatChem 8/2011) (page 1217)

      Dr. Bjoern Schimmoeller, Prof. Dr. Sotiris E. Pratsinis and Prof. Dr. Alfons Baiker

      Version of Record online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190032

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      The cover picture shows a selection of electron microscopy images of samples synthesized by using flame aerosol synthesis and photographs of flame reactors. In their Review on p. 1234 ff., Baiker et al. reveal that by using these flame reactors, and other related techniques, a large variety of mixed metal oxide and supported noble metal catalysts can be produced, which display significantly different characteristics from their wet-chemistry derived counterparts and present unprecedented structural and catalytic properties.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Oriented Immobilization of Enzymes Made Fit for Applied Biocatalysis: Non-Covalent Attachment to Anionic Supports using Zbasic2 Module (ChemCatChem 8/2011) (page 1218)

      Johanna Wiesbauer, Dr. Juan M. Bolivar, Dr. Mario Mueller, Margaretha Schiller and Prof. Dr. Bernd Nidetzky

      Version of Record online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190033

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      The inside cover picture shows the structural model of sucrose phosphorylase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides fused to a positively charged Zbasic2 module that is placed next to a carrier surface showing the opposing (negative) charge. In their Communication on p. 1299 ff., B. Nidetzky et al., describe that non-covalent attachment to ionic supports is a very useful approach for a reversible oriented immobilization of a number of enzymes. High protein loading and excellent catalytic effectiveness of the carrier-bound enzymes can be achieved.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Flame Aerosol Synthesis of Metal Oxide Catalysts with Unprecedented Structural and Catalytic Properties (pages 1234–1256)

      Dr. Bjoern Schimmoeller, Prof. Dr. Sotiris E. Pratsinis and Prof. Dr. Alfons Baiker

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000425

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It′s getting hot in here! Flame synthesis and especially flame spray pyrolysis is a versatile technique for the production of a large variety of mixed metal oxide and supported noble metal catalysts. These aerosol-based methods allow tailoring the physical and chemical characteristics of such novel materials. Such flame-made catalysts can be significantly different from their wet-chemistry derived counterparts and show unprecedented structural and catalytic properties.

  6. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Advancement in Molecular Hydrogen Storage Systems (pages 1257–1259)

      Sebastian Sahler and Dr. Martin H. G. Prechtl

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100109

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      Getting light: Guanidinium borohydride (GBH) and ethylene-diamine bisborane (EDB) represent interesting molecular materials for hydrogen storage. Certain systems are theoretically able to deliver up to 5 equiv of dihydrogen (12.4 wt %) under mild conditions. The yielded hydrogen gas is of high purity and produces defined B[BOND]N species which are important for an efficient regeneration-process.

    2. Alkoxy–Arene Cleavage using Ni Catalysts (pages 1260–1261)

      Dr. Gerard P. McGlacken and Sarah L. Clarke

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100087

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      Caught in nickel crosshairs: Aryl methoxy groups have been reduced by using a nickel catalyst to form new C[BOND]H bonds in simple and complex molecules, through an incredibly useful process, which will give synthetic chemists a handle on selectively targeting key inert bonds.

  7. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Rational Design of Microporous and Mesoporous Solids for Catalysis: From the Molecule to the Reactor (pages 1263–1272)

      Dr. Benoît Louis, Dr. Guillaume Laugel, Prof. Patrick Pale and Prof. Marcelo Maciel Pereira

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100110

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      Moving on up! In the general shift from homogeneous catalysis towards heterogeneous catalysis, zeolites play a key role. The rational design of these inorganic materials with highly crystalline structures is warranted by both academic and industrial research. The ambitious task of combining molecular, microscopic, and macroscopic design of zeolites is considered in this concept article.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Rhodium-Catalyzed Cyclocarbonylation of Alkynes to Hydroquinones (pages 1273–1276)

      Dr. Holger Klein, Dr. Ralf Jackstell, Dr. Thomas Netscher, Dr. Werner Bonrath and Prof. Dr. Matthias Beller

      Version of Record online: 27 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100095

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      Cycle surprise: Ethyne as well as phenylactylene react with synthesis gas to hydroquinones in the presence of a Rh-phosphine catalyst. Especially in case of phenylacetylene, the presence of ammonia is essential for the reaction.

    2. Sinter-Resistant Pd/SiO2 Nanocatalyst Prepared by Impregnation Method (pages 1277–1280)

      Bing Li, Prof. Wei-Zheng Weng, Qing Zhang, Zhao-Wen Wang and Prof. Hui-Lin Wan

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100043

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      Dispersed on sand: Well-dispersed Pd/SiO2 nanocatalysts with Pd loadings between 0.5 and 5.0 wt % and an excellent resistance to sintering can be prepared by using a simple impregnation method using palladium bis-acetylacetonate as the Pd precursor. The mean size of the Pd particles on SiO2 remains at 3–4 nm even after calcination at 800 °C. The catalyst exhibits good activity for CO oxidation and aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol.

    3. Cross-Coupling in the Preparation of Pharmaceutically Relevant Substrates using Palladium Supported on Functionalized Mesoporous Silicas (pages 1281–1285)

      Dr. Abdelkrim El Kadib, Dr. Kevin McEleney, Tomohiro Seki, Dr. Thomas K. Wood and Prof. Cathleen M. Crudden

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100021

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      Going back to black: Palladium-containing, organically functionalized, mesoporous silicas have been found to be efficient catalysts for the synthesis of functionalized compounds including pharmaceutical precursors in high yield with low levels of metal contamination. In cases where comparisons to reported Pd contamination are possible, our system is found to be significantly more effective.

    4. The Remarkable Improvement of a Ce[BOND]Ti based Catalyst for NOx Abatement, Prepared by a Homogeneous Precipitation Method (pages 1286–1289)

      Wenpo Shan, Dr. Fudong Liu, Prof. Hong He, Dr. Xiaoyan Shi and Dr. Changbin Zhang

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201000409

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catalysis is so exhausting: A Ce[BOND]Ti mixed oxide catalyst prepared by a homogeneous precipitation method presented excellent NH3-SCR activity with nearly 100 % NOx conversion in a temperature range of 200–350 °C (the main temperature range of diesel engine exhaust) at a space velocity of 50 000 h−1 and displayed prominent performance even under a high space velocity of 150 000 h−1.

    5. Self-Regenerative Silver Nanocluster Catalyst for CO Oxidation (pages 1290–1293)

      Dr. Ken-ichi Shimizu, Dr. Kyoichi Sawabe and Prof. Atsushi Satsuma

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100122

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      Can't keep me down: Silver nanoclusters (NCs), formed by spontaneous atomic-level dispersion of non-nano silver onto Al2O3 surface, show self- regenerative properties during redox aging above 900 °C and, consequently, higher activity than state-of-the-art CO oxidation catalysts after the aging. Size-dependence of the activity and DFT calculation indicate that Ag atoms at corner/edge sites are the active site of Ag NCs.

    6. Highly Selective and Complete Conversion of Cellobiose to Gluconic Acid over Au/Cs2HPW12O40 Nanocomposite Catalyst (pages 1294–1298)

      Jizhe Zhang, Dr. Xin Liu, Dr. Mohamed Nejib Hedhili, Dr. Yihan Zhu and Prof. Yu Han

      Version of Record online: 30 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100106

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      Gluconic acid for everyone! A novel Au/Cs2HPW12O40 bifunctional catalyst has been prepared that enables the selective conversion of cellobiose to gluconic acid with a very high yield (up to 96.4 %).

    7. Oriented Immobilization of Enzymes Made Fit for Applied Biocatalysis: Non-Covalent Attachment to Anionic Supports using Zbasic2 Module (pages 1299–1303)

      Johanna Wiesbauer, Dr. Juan M. Bolivar, Dr. Mario Mueller, Margaretha Schiller and Prof. Dr. Bernd Nidetzky

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100103

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      Charge is the message: Non-covalent attachment to anionic supports (red) through a positively charged Zbasic2 (blue) module is a powerful approach for reversible oriented immobilization of enzymes (pI 4-7) on ion-exchange resins commonly used in the protein and enzyme technology. High protein loading and near-native catalytic effectiveness of the carrier-bound enzyme can be achieved.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Boron Compounds as Stabilizers of a Complex Microstructure in a Co-B-based Catalyst for NaBH4 Hydrolysis (pages 1305–1313)

      G. M. Arzac, Dr. T. C. Rojas and Dr. A. Fernández

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100101

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      Co-ddling together: Boron and cobalt chemistry allow for stabilization of a complex architecture on the nanoscale for a widely used CoB catalyst. Through nanoscale-resolution microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, the amorphous B-based phases, which stabilize the unusually small 1–3 nm hcp Co0 nanoparticles, are identified. This microstructure explains the high catalytic activity for the generation of hydrogen from sodium borohydride.

    2. Optimized Biocatalytically Active Static Emulsions for Organic Synthesis in Nonaqueous Media (pages 1314–1319)

      Changzhu Wu, Prof. Dr. Matthias Kraume and Prof. Dr. Marion B. Ansorge-Schumacher

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100085

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      Biocatalytically active static emulsions: The structure and morphology of biocatalytically active static emulsions and optimization in terms of bead size distribution and overall catalytic performance were presented. The adjustment of bead composition increased the apparent catalytic activity of entrapped lipase A from Candida antarctica (CalA) almost twofold compared to that previously reported.

    3. Chiral NHC-Complexes with Dioxolane Backbone Heterogenized on MCM-41. Catalytic Activity (pages 1320–1328)

      Gonzalo Villaverde, Prof. Avelino Corma, Prof. Marta Iglesias and Prof. Félix Sánchez

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100119

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      The lives of gold: New methods for the heterogenization of NHC-chiral complexes on porous silica supports are demonstrated for the facile recovery and recycle of these catalysts. Activities, selectivities, and recyclabilities are compared to the analogous homogeneous catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation reactions.

    4. Starch Immobilized Ruthenium Trichloride Catalyzed Oxidative Cyanation of Tertiary Amines with Hydrogen Peroxide. (pages 1329–1332)

      Sanny Verma, Dr. Suman L. Jain and Dr. Bir Sain

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100111

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      Not just for ironing: Starch immobilized ruthenium trichloride was found to be an efficient and recyclable catalyst for the oxidative cyanation of tertiary amines to α-aminonitriles in high yields using hydrogen peroxide with sodium cyanide in acetic acid. ECS: Expanded corn starch.

    5. High-Temperature Produced Catalytic Sites Selective for n-Alkane Dehydrogenation in Acid Zeolites: The Case of HZSM-5 (pages 1333–1341)

      Dr. Khalid A. Al-majnouni, Jang Ho Yun and Prof. Raul F. Lobo

      Version of Record online: 27 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100107

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      Enhancing n-alkane dehydrogenation: Heating HZSM-5 zeolites in the absence of water leads to the dehydroxylation of Brønsted-acid sites and the formation of new (nonacidic) sites that are very selective for propane dehydrogenation. The new sites formed catalyze the dehydrogenation of propane at rates comparable to the rates shown by HZSM-5 prior to thermal treatment.

    6. Enhanced Catalytic Performance by Zirconium Phosphate-Modified SiO2-Supported Ru[BOND]Co Catalyst for Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis (pages 1342–1347)

      Dr. Jong Wook Bae, Seon-Ju Park, Min Hee Woo, Joo Young Cheon, Dr. Kyoung-Su Ha, Dr. Ki-Won Jun, Dr. Dong-Hyun Lee and Dr. Hyun Min Jung

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100102

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      Surface modification with zirconium phosphate (ZrP) on SiO2 support with an appropriate amount of phosphorous component prevents cobalt particle aggregation and enhances its stability. These positive effects of ZrP are mainly induced by the spatial confinement of cobalt particles in a thermally stable ZrP matrix, the catalytic performance of which could be greatly improved.

    7. A Theoretical Study of Hydrogen Transfer Catalyzed by an IrIII PC(sp3)P Pincer Complex (pages 1348–1353)

      Dr. Sebastian Kozuch and Dr. Clarite Azerraf

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100056

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      Getting a grip on iridium: An IrIII PC(sp3)P pincer catalyst for hydrogen transfer is activated only after a base attacks the carbonyl ligand.

    8. Methane Activation over Cellulose Templated Perovskite Catalysts (pages 1354–1358)

      Kirsten Langfeld, René Marschner, Dr. Benjamin Frank and Prof. Dr. Reinhard Schomäcker

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100033

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      Burn Baby Burn: Perovskite type catalysts prepared using cellulose templating provided a high crystallinity at low phase transformation temperatures and demonstrated high reactivities in the oxidation of methane. A broad variety of these mixed oxides can be prepared in a rapid and clean process.

    9. Anion–Cation Cooperative Catalysis by Ionic Liquids (pages 1359–1364)

      Lifeng Zhang, Xianlei Fu and Prof. Guohua Gao

      Version of Record online: 7 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201100016

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      Cooperative Catalysis: Cations and anions of ionic liquids cooperatively activate electrophiles and nucleophiles. The cations activate electrophiles through the hydrogen-bond interaction with the carbonyl group, and the anions activate nucleophiles by accepting the hydrogen bond.

  10. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Highlights
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
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      Preview: ChemCatChem 9/2011 (page 1367)

      Version of Record online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201190036

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