ChemCatChem

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 12

December 2012

Volume 4, Issue 12

Pages 1865–2120

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Rational Design of a Molecular Nanocatalyst-Stabilizer that Enhances both Catalytic Activity and Nanoparticle Stability (ChemCatChem 12/2012) (page 1865)

      Dr. Ryan R. Dykeman, Dr. Yuan Yuan, Dr. Ning Yan, Hiroyuki Asakura, Dr. Kentaro Teramura, Prof. Tsunehiro Tanaka and Prof. Paul J. Dyson

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201290044

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      Ligands as Stabilizers The cover picture represents a ligand-coated nanoparticle that is switched off (closed shell) and on (open shell showing the nanoparticle) when the ligand partially dissociates. In their Communication on page 1907 ff., P. J. Dyson et al. describe how the partial dissociation of the ligand endows the nanoparticle with stability, thus high catalytic activities can be achieved in the hydrogenation of toluene without compromising the overall stability of the catalyst, thanks to the modified bis-bipyridine ligand.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Clean, Convenient, High-yield Access to Second-generation Ru Metathesis Catalysts from Commercially Available Precursors (ChemCatChem 12/2012) (page 1866)

      Dr. Bianca J. van Lierop, Amy M. Reckling, Justin A. M. Lummiss and Prof. Deryn E. Fogg

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201290045

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      Keeping Metathesis Simple The cover picture shows a clean, general, and highly efficient route to the three dominant ruthenium catalysts currently used for olefin metathesis. The Full Paper by D. E. Fogg et al. on p. 2020 ff., describes the synthesis of “second-generation” Ru metathesis catalysts in ≥95% isolated yield and excellent purity, by reacting the PCy3 parent complexes with isolated free H2IMes, and using an ion-exchange resin to sequester the liberated phosphine. Workup involves simply filtration and evaporation of the solvent. The speed, efficiency, generality and convenience of this methodology provides an attractive alternative to prior approaches based on in situ deprotonation or deprotection of imidazolinium derivatives.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: Palladium-Supported Boron-Doped Hollow Carbon Spheres as Catalysts for the Solvent-free Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols (ChemCatChem 12/2012) (page 2128)

      Dr. Vilas Ravat, Isaac Nongwe and Prof. Neil J. Coville

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201290048

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      From Boring to Boron ‘Here's a little song I wrote, you might want to sing it note for note, Don't worry B happy’—as sung by Bobby Mcferrin (and Bob Marley)—illustrates how a little bit of boron (B) can turn that frown upside down. The accompanying illustration shows the oxidation of benzyl alcohol (over a Pd catalyst supported on carbon spheres) to benzylaldehye. In their Communication on page 1930 ff., N. Coville et al. show how by incorporating some boron into the boring carbon spheres (undoped), the conversion and recyclability of the catalyst can be greatly improved, bringing a smile to your face. From boring to boron.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
  3. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
  5. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. When Outliers Make All The Difference (pages 1887–1888)

      Dr. Lars C. Grabow

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200411

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      Cutting costs with copper: Facile dissociation of hydrogen molecules on isolated Pd atoms followed by diffusion to the dominating Cu surface are the two key ingredients for a novel class of bifunctional catalysts. The resulting H atoms are weakly bound to the catalyst surface and are readily available for subsequent selective hydrogenation steps.

  6. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Biocatalysis: Key to Selective Oxidations (pages 1889–1895)

      Sebastian Schulz, Dr. Marco Girhard and Prof. Vlada B. Urlacher

      Version of Record online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200533

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      Going green with biooxidation! The use of cytochrome P450 enzymes for the oxidation of nonactivated hydrocarbons enables the production of high-value chemicals. Mild reaction conditions and reduced consumption of natural resources combined with high selectivity of P450 enzymes results in “green biocatalysts” with great potential in synthetic production of sought-after fine chemicals, drugs, drug metabolites, and vitamins.

  7. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Heterogeneous Catalysis: A Key Tool toward Sustainability (pages 1897–1906)

      Dr.  Claude Descorme, Dr.  Pierre Gallezot, Dr.  Christophe Geantet and Dr.  Christian George

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200483

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      Best tool for the job? Heterogeneous catalysis is presently an essential tool to achieve a sustainable use of resources for energy, chemical, and material production and to preserve and rehabilitate our environment. The key challenge is to improve the energy-, cost-, and atom-efficiency to achieve an additional step toward a sustainable development.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Rational Design of a Molecular Nanocatalyst-Stabilizer that Enhances both Catalytic Activity and Nanoparticle Stability (pages 1907–1910)

      Dr. Ryan R. Dykeman, Dr. Yuan Yuan, Dr. Ning Yan, Hiroyuki Asakura, Dr. Kentaro Teramura, Prof. Tsunehiro Tanaka and Prof. Paul J. Dyson

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200552

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      Clap your hands for catalysis: A new stabilizer, based on an electron-poor bipyridene dimer, that endows nanocatalysts with superior properties, in terms of activity and stability, was designed following a fundamental study that revealed the function of the stabilizer in the catalytic process.

    2. Ruthenium–Benzylidenes and Ruthenium–Indenylidenes as Efficient Catalysts for the Hydrogenation of Aliphatic Nitriles into Primary Amines (pages 1911–1916)

      Dr. Xiaowei Miao, Johan Bidange, Prof. Pierre H. Dixneuf, Dr. Cédric Fischmeister, Dr. Christian Bruneau, Dr. Jean-Luc Dubois and Dr. Jean-Luc Couturier

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200511

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      Emphatic aliphatics: The catalytic reduction of alkyl nitriles into primary amines with ruthenium–benzylidene and ruthenium–indenylidene catalysts allowed the efficient hydrogenation of aliphatic nitrile esters that were derived from plant oils.

    3. Selective Reduction of Nitroarenes by using Zeolite-Supported Copper Nanoparticles with 2-Propanol as a Sustainable Reducing Agent (pages 1917–1921)

      Thirumeni Subramanian and Prof. Kasi Pitchumani

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200443

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      Thanks for the support: The reduction of various nitroaromatic compounds into their corresponding amines is achieved by zeolite-supported copper nanoparticles with 2-propanol as a sustainable reducing agent with good selectivity and excellent yields.

    4. Copper-Catalyzed Direct Synthesis of Benzamides from Alcohols and Amines (pages 1922–1925)

      Dr. Xavier Bantreil, Clément Fleith, Prof. Dr. Jean Martinez and Dr. Frédéric Lamaty

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200441

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      Ready, steady, copper! The efficient copper-catalyzed formation of amides, from benzylic alcohols and hydrochloride salts of primary- and secondary amines, uses cheap and readily available copper oxide, as well as tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP) as an oxidant.

    5. Al-SBA-16-Supported Cobalt Catalysts for the Fischer–Tropsch Production of Gasoline-Fraction Hydrocarbons (pages 1926–1929)

      Dr. Yanxi Zhao, Prof. Jinlin Li, Dr. Yuhua Zhang, Dr. Shufang Chen and Prof. Kongyong Liew

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200394

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      The gas station: Gasoline-fraction hydrocarbons were obtained on a Co by using an Al-SBA-16 support. The introduction of Al into the SBA-16 framework not only generates weak-acid sites but also retains the structural properties of SBA-16. The acidity of the support plays a crucial role in controlling the selectivity in the Fischer–Tropsch synthesis. The selectivity for C5–C12 hydrocarbons over the 10AlCo/SBA-16 catalyst reached about 60 %.

    6. Palladium-Supported Boron-Doped Hollow Carbon Spheres as Catalysts for the Solvent-free Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols (pages 1930–1934)

      Dr. Vilas Ravat, Isaac Nongwe and Prof. Neil J. Coville

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200374

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      Don′t worry, B-happy: Hollow carbon spheres (HCSs) that were modified by doping with boron (B-HCSs) by using a CVD method showed high thermal stability compared with undoped HCSs. Pd was more-homogeneously dispersed on the surface of B-HCSs than on HCSs or on activated carbon. Pd/B-HCS is a selective, highly efficient, and recyclable catalyst for the solvent-free oxidation of alcohols.

    7. New Bis(dialkynyldisiloxane)triplatinum(0) Cluster: Synthesis, Structure, and Catalytic Activity in Olefin-Hydrosilylation Reactions (pages 1935–1937)

      Prof. Bogdan Marciniec, Krystian Posała, Dr. Ireneusz Kownacki, Dr. Maciej Kubicki and Dr. Richard Taylor

      Version of Record online: 28 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200319

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      General cluster′s last stand: The synthesis of triplatinum(0) clusters of the general composition [Pt3{O(SiMe2C[TRIPLE BOND]C[BOND]R)2}2] is described. These complexes have a unique coordination structure and exhibit excellent reactivity and selectivity towards the addition of Si[BOND]H bonds to C[DOUBLE BOND]C bonds, thereby affording their corresponding hydrosilylation products in high yields.

    8. Preparation of a Ru-Nanoparticles/Defective-Graphene Composite as a Highly Efficient Arene-Hydrogenation Catalyst (pages 1938–1942)

      Dr. Ke Xin Yao, Dr. Xin Liu, Zheng Li, Cheng Chao Li, Prof. Dr. Hua Chun Zeng and Prof. Dr. Yu Han

      Version of Record online: 6 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200354

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      A right mix-up! A facile approach is reported that enables the in situ production of fine Ru nanoparticles (d≈3 nm) on graphene oxide. The as-obtained composite shows superior catalytic activity and stability for the hydrogenation of arenes.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlight
    7. Minireview
    8. Concept
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Oxidation Ability of CO2 for the Transformation of Cinnamic Aldehydes to Acids Catalyzed by N-Heterocyclic Carbene: Combining Computational and Experimental Studies (pages 1943–1951)

      Dr. Xingye Ren, Dr. Yanli Yuan, Dr. Yan Ju and Dr. Hongming Wang

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200529

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      To react or not to react? Owing to its nucleophilicity, N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) can initiate the reaction of CO2 with aldehydes to form the acid products through two very different reaction channels. Although the energy barrier is lower if the reaction is assisted by H2O, the highest energy barriers of all channels are still larger than 40 kcal mol−1, which indicates that this reaction cannot be performed at room temperature. R=Aromatic group.

    2. Promotional Effect of Ni on a CrOx Catalyst Supported on Silica in the Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane with CO2 (pages 1952–1959)

      Danim Yun, Jayeon Baek, Youngbo Choi, Dr. Wooyoung Kim, Dr. Hee Jong Lee and Prof. Jongheop Yi

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200397

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      Ni-ce one: Active Cr3+ states formed from the reduction of higher valence states Cr6+ are reduced during oxidative dehydrogenation of propane with CO2 (ODHP), leading to the deactivation of a CrOx/silica catalyst. With an Ni promoter on the CrOx/silica catalyst, CO2 is a more effective oxidant and reduced Cr2+ states are regenerated to active Cr3+ states. The Ni-promoted CrOx/SBA-15 catalyst yields propylene in the ODHP reaction.

    3. Synergistic Effect of a Carbon Black Supported PtAg Non-Alloy Bimetal Nanocatalyst for CO Preferential Oxidation in Excess Hydrogen (pages 1960–1967)

      Dr. Limin Chen, Prof. Ding Ma, Dr. Zhen Zhang, Yuanyuan Guo, Prof. Daiqi Ye and Prof. Bichun Huang

      Version of Record online: 9 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200365

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      Precious synergism: A synergistic effect of theory-directed PtAg/carbon black non-alloy nanocatalysts was observed in the preferential oxidation of CO in excess H2. Simultaneous reduction of Pt and Ag species and high temperature activation initiate strong Pt[BOND]Ag interactions which cause the synergistic effect and, consequently, high catalytic performance. This catalyst may also effectively alleviate the catalyst poisoning by CO-like intermediates in direct liquid fuel cells.

    4. A Single-Stage Water–Gas Shift Reaction over Highly Active and Stable Si- and Al-Substituted Pt/CeO2 Catalysts (pages 1968–1978)

      Vijay M. Shinde and Prof.  Giridhar Madras

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200363

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      Still going after shutdown: Si- and Al-modified Pt/CeO2 catalysts are synthesized and tested for the water–gas shift reaction. The catalytic activity of Pt/CeO2 increases with Si and Al substitution. These catalysts are stable during repeated startup/shutdown operations.

    5. Boosting Lewis Acid Catalysis in Water-in-Oil Metallomicroemulsions (pages 1979–1986)

      Dr. María Méndez-Pérez, Prof. Luis García-Río and Dr. Moisés Pérez-Lorenzo

      Version of Record online: 27 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200337

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      Way faster if confined! Sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate-based water-in-oil metallomicroemulsions increase the catalytic efficiency of metal Lewis acid catalysts by approximately 1000 % of that found in bulk water.

    6. Synthesis of Aldehydes by Layer-by-Layer Immobilized Laccases in the Presence of Redox Mediators (pages 1987–1996)

      Dr. Melissa Guazzaroni, Dr. Tiziana Bozzini and Prof. Raffaele Saladino

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200330

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      Catalysis in versicolor: Laccase from Trametes versicolor was immobilized on EupergitC250L and alumina particles and coated by means of the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. Immobilized laccase-based catalysts were efficiently used for the selective oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes in the presence of redox mediators.

    7. The Role of Oxygen- and Nitrogen-containing Surface Groups on the Sintering of Iron Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes in Different Atmospheres (pages 1997–2004)

      Dr. Miguel D. Sánchez, Peirong Chen, Dr. Thomas Reinecke, Prof. Dr. Martin Muhler and Dr. Wei Xia

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200286

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      ON the face of it: The effect of O- and N-containing surface groups on the sintering of iron oxide nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes under different atmospheres was studied. N-groups are more effective in prohibiting the sintering than O-groups. Thermal treatment in helium led to a significant widening of particle size distributions, whereas treatment in hydrogen and ammonia led to less sintering.

    8. Effect of Platinum Incorporation on the Energetics and Oxygen Chemisorption Properties of the Ni(1 1 1) Surface (pages 2005–2012)

      Dr. Aslıhan Sümer and Prof. Dr. A. Erhan Aksoylu

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200271

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      Pt makes it sustainable: Ni oxidation is an important cause of deactivation of Ni catalysts in Oxidative Steam reforming (OSR). Oxygen chemisorption is weakened on the Ni(1 1 1) surface after platinum substitution, which provides the sustainability of the Pt–Ni catalyst in OSR via preventing oxidation of Ni during the reaction

    9. One-Pot Conversion of Inulin to Furan Derivatives Catalyzed by Sulfated TiO2/Mordenite Solid Acid (pages 2013–2019)

      Dr. X. Shen, Y. X. Wang, C. W. Hu, K. Qian, Z. Ji and M. Jin

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200190

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      Mordenite mystery: A sulfated TiO2/mordenite solid acid catalyzes the one-pot conversion of inulin to HMF and FCA. The 83 % inulin conversion after hydrolysis and 61.5 % HMF yield after fructose dehydration in a water/2-butanol biphasic system represents a well- facilitated separation process. Catalytic performance could owe to the SO42− groups and Lewis acid sites on the TiO2 surfaces.

    10. Clean, Convenient, High-yield Access to Second-generation Ru Metathesis Catalysts from Commercially Available Precursors (pages 2020–2025)

      Dr. Bianca J. van Lierop, Amy M. Reckling, Justin A. M. Lummiss and Prof. Deryn E. Fogg

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200540

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      Lording over metathesis: The three dominant ruthenium catalysts for olefin metathesis are accessible in yields of 95 % or higher by ligand exchange of their PCy3 parents with isolated free H2IMes, followed by treatment with a cation-exchange resin to remove the liberated phosphine. Workup entails simply filtration and evaporation of solvent.

    11. Graphene Oxide as Catalyst for the Acetalization of Aldehydes at Room Temperature (pages 2026–2030)

      Dr. Amarajothi Dhakshinamoorthy, Dr. Mercedes Alvaro, Marta Puche, Dr. Vicente Fornes and Prof. Dr. Hermenegildo Garcia

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200461

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      Promotion through Hummers: Graphene oxide obtained through the standard Hummers oxidation of graphite and subsequent exfoliation promotes the acetalization of aldehydes in methanol. It is a highly efficient reusable heterogeneous catalyst because of its advantages of absence of transition metals, sustainable resources, and high activity, large surface area, and accessibility of active sites.

    12. Selective Hydrogenation of 1,3-Butadiene and 1-Butyne over a Rh/Chitosan Catalyst Investigated by using Parahydrogen-Induced Polarization (pages 2031–2035)

      Danila A. Barskiy, Dr.  Kirill V. Kovtunov, Dr.  Ana Primo, Prof.  Avelino Corma, Prof.  Robert Kaptein and Prof.  Igor V. Koptyug

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200414

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      In pairwise fashion: Hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene and 1-butyne over the Rh/chitosan heterogeneous catalyst in gaseous and liquid phases is investigated. Hydrogenation is very selective and no significant amount of butane is formed. The syn- and anti-addition of hydrogen to 1-butyne are investigated by using the parahydrogen-induced polarization technique.

    13. Deactivation and Regeneration of H-USY Zeolite during Lignin Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis (pages 2036–2044)

      Zhiqiang Ma and Prof. Dr. Jeroen A. van Bokhoven

      Version of Record online: 6 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200401

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      Are you coming or going? It is possible to regenerate the H-USY zeolite during lignin catalytic fast pyrolysis. Calcination restores the catalytic performance to a large extent. The catalytic performance is further improved after the reintroduction of an acid site.

    14. Azaphosphatrane Cations: Weak Acids, Robust Phase-transfer Catalysts (pages 2045–2049)

      Dr. Pascal Dimitrov-Raytchev, Dr. Jean-Pierre Dutasta and Dr. Alexandre Martinez

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200367

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      Pushing boundaries: Azaphosphatrane cations are tested as phase-transfer catalysts in representative reactions under strong basic conditions such as alkylation or oxidation. The catalyst performance depends on the lipophilicity/ hydrophilicity ratio. In general, their activities are very high and comparable to those reported for tetrabutylammonium bromide.

    15. Hydrolysis of Fatty Acid Esters by Candida Antarctica Lipase B (Novozym 435) Dissolved in Anhydrous Triethylamine (pages 2050–2054)

      Markus Braner, Stefan Zielonka, Julius Grzeschik, Simon Krah, Sebastian Lieb, Daniel Petras, Xenia Wagner, Imrana Ahmed and Prof. Dr. Stefan H. Hüttenhain

      Version of Record online: 11 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200355

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      Race against time: Rapid hydrolysis is observed as a competing reaction for the kinetic racemate resolution of a selection of esters catalyzed by an enzyme (Novozym 435). The hydrolysis shows stereoselectivity, and enhanced reaction rates are observed if triethylamine is used as the solvent.

    16. Preparation Methods for Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Supported Palladium Catalysts (pages 2055–2061)

      Emma Sairanen, Dr. Reetta Karinen, Maryam Borghei, Prof. Esko I. Kauppinen and Prof. Juha Lehtonen

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200344

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      A pregnant example: Multi-walled carbon nanotube-supported Pd catalysts prepared by dry and wet impregnation and atomic layer deposition (ALD) are studied. Cinnamaldehyde hydrogenation is used as a model reaction to clarify the differences between different catalysts. On the ALD-prepared catalyst, the reaction proceed further over smaller metal particles because C[DOUBLE BOND]C and C[DOUBLE BOND]C bonds are hydrogenated simultaneously.

    17. Highly Selective Linear Dimerization of Styrenes by Ceria-Supported Ruthenium Catalysts (pages 2062–2067)

      Shun Shimura, Dr. Hiroki Miura, Shinji Tsukada, Prof. Dr. Kenji Wada, Dr. Saburo Hosokawa and Prof. Dr. Masashi Inoue

      Version of Record online: 7 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200342

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      Branching out: Solid ceria-supported ruthenium catalysts are used to realize the linear-selective dimerization of styrenes to give (E)-1,4-diaryl-1-butenes. The regioselectivity can be switched through the choice of a suitable solvent. Reactions in N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) or N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone produce the corresponding branched dimers in good yields with complete regioselectivity.

    18. Carbon Nanotubes: A Promising Catalyst Support Material for Supercritical Water Gasification of Biomass Waste (pages 2068–2074)

      Ir. Dennis J. M. de Vlieger, Dr. Digvijay B. Thakur, Prof. Dr. Ir. Leon Lefferts and Prof. Dr. K. Seshan

      Version of Record online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200318

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      One for the supercritics: Supercritical water is an attractive reaction medium for the production of sustainable chemicals from biomass. However, the lack of an efficient catalyst support material stalls further development of this technique. We show that carbon nanotubes are a promising catalytic support material for SCW gasification of interesting model compounds.

    19. The Influence of Alkali Metals on the Ce-Ti Mixed Oxide Catalyst for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx (pages 2075–2081)

      Dr. Xuesen Du, Prof. Xiang Gao, Ruiyang Qu, Peidong Ji, Prof. Zhongyang Luo and Prof. Ke-fa Cen

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200316

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      Under the influence of alkali: Alkali atoms can strongly interact with the oxygen atoms of cerium and titanium oxides, which decreases the reducibility and surface acidity of the Ce-Ti oxide catalyst. This is the main cause of deactivation of this selective reduction catalyst.

    20. High Throughput Screening of a Catalyst Library for the Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Heteroaromatic Ketones: Formal Syntheses of (R)-Fluoxetine and (S)-Duloxetine (pages 2082–2089)

      Elina Buitrago, Helena Lundberg, Hans Andersson, Per Ryberg and Hans Adolfsson

      Version of Record online: 7 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200308

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      Shush, I′m reducing: A library of 21 α-amino acid based ligands is evaluated in combination with ruthenium and rhodium arene precursors for the asymmetric reduction of heteroaromatic ketones under transfer hydrogenation conditions. Optimum catalysts are found for four different substrate classes and employed in the key reduction steps in the formal total syntheses of the antidepressant drugs (R)-fluoxetine and (S)-duloxetine.

    21. Microwave-Assisted Transfer Hydrogenation of Ketones by Ru(xantphos) Arene Complexes (pages 2090–2095)

      Dr. Thashree Marimuthu and Prof. Holger B. Friedrich

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200306

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      Microwave irradiation saves time: A homogeneous microwaved-assisted system for the transfer hydrogenation of organic substrates that consists of [Ru(xantphos)(p-cymene)(Cl)] complex as the catalyst and iPrOH as the hydrogen donor and in the presence of a strong base catalyzes efficiently the reduction of ketones to secondary alcohols.

    22. Hemilabile BINAP(O) as a Chiral Ligand in Desymmetrizing Mizoroki–Heck Cyclizations (pages 2096–2101)

      Thorsten H. Wöste and Prof. Dr. Martin Oestreich

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200300

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      What a difference an O makes: BINAP is not effective at inducing any enantiomeric excess in the desymmetrizing Mizoroki–Heck cyclization of representative prochiral precursors. BINAP(O), in turn, induces substantially improved levels of enantiocontrol. Mechanistic models are proposed that rely on either BINAP(O)'s hemilabile nature (Scheme left) or BINAP(O)'s monodentate coordination mode (Scheme right).

    23. Rare Earth-doped Ceria Catalysts for ODHE Reaction in a Catalytic Modified MIEC Membrane Reactor (pages 2102–2111)

      Dr.  M. Pilar Lobera, María Balaguer, Julio Garcia-Fayos and Dr. José M. Serra

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200212

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      Insane in the membrane: An intensification process for the selective oxidation of hydrocarbons integrates a catalytic reactor and an oxygen separation membrane. This work presents the study of oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane at 1123 K in a catalytic membrane reactor based on mixed ionic-electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes (BSCF=Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3−δ).

    24. One-Pot Sol–Gel Preparation for Efficient Cobalt–Molybdenum–Titania Hydrotreating Catalysts (pages 2112–2120)

      D. L. Nguyen, S. Gillot, D. O. Souza, Dr. P. Blanchard, Prof. C. Lamonier, Dr. E. Berrier, T. V. Kotbagi, Dr. M. K. Dongare, Dr. S. B. Umbarkar, Prof. S. Cristol, Prof. E. Payen and Dr. C. Lancelot

      Version of Record online: 27 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200165

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      One-pot adventures: Titania-based hydrodesulfurization catalysts were prepared by using a one-pot sol–gel method, with a titanium peroxo complex as the Ti-precursor. Molybdenum and cobalt precursors were dissolved in the aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution used during synthesis. Catalysts with MoO3 loadings that vary from 5 to 40 wt% and a Co/Mo atomic ratio of 0.5 were prepared.

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