ChemCatChem

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 11

Special Issue: Frontiers in Catalysis Research

November 2013

Volume 5, Issue 11

Pages 3177–3403

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Ruthenium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation of Oxygen-Functionalized Aromatic Compounds in Water (ChemCatChem 11/2013) (page 3177)

      Dominik Jantke, Dr. Mirza Cokoja, Dr. Markus Drees, Prof. Dr. Dr. Wolfgang A. Herrmann and Prof. Dr. Fritz E. Kühn

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201390053

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      On the way to clean biomass conversion The cover picture shows that oxygen functionalized arenes serve as model substrates for aromatic derivatives found for example in lignocellulosic biomass such as phenol or acetophenone. These arenes are hydrogenated to obtain the analogue cyclohexane derivatives in water. As precatalyst, a highly soluble sulfonated ruthenium(II) bis-carbene complex is used. In their Full Paper on page 3241 ff., W. A. Herrmann, F. E. Kühn and co-workers explain that the results imply a homogenous reaction pathway involving the formation of a ruthenium(II) hydride complex as the active species.

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      Inside Cover: Synthesis of Methanethiol from CS2 on Ni-, Co-, and K-Doped MoS2/SiO2 Catalysts (ChemCatChem 11/2013) (page 3178)

      Dr. Oliver Y. Gutiérrez, Dr. Liangshu Zhong, Dr. Yongzhong Zhu and Dr. Johannes A. Lercher

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201390054

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      Molybdenum carries the load The cover picture shows the reaction of CS2 and H2 over supported MoS2-type catalysts as a novel route for the synthesis of methanethiol, an important raw material in chemical industry. In their Full Paper on page 3249 ff., J. A. Lercher and co-workers describe the mechanism and kinetics of the reaction emphasizing the effect of Ni, Co, or K on the rates of hydrogenation and C[BOND]S bond cleavage on MoS2. Thus, while aiming for the production of methanethiol with high rates and selectivity, the study also contributes to the understanding of the promotion of MoS2.

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      Back Cover: Fundamental Insight into the Substrate-Dependent Ripening of Monodisperse Clusters (ChemCatChem 11/2013) (page 3408)

      Yves Fukamori, Michael König, Dr. Bokwon Yoon, Dr. Bo Wang, Dr. Friedrich Esch, Prof. Ueli Heiz and Prof. Uzi Landman

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201390057

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      Close-up on cluster ripening The cover picture shows the ripening of monodisperse clusters upon tuning of the periodic substrate wettability. On superstructured graphene, clusters grow mainly by Smoluchowski ripening, whereas Ostwald ripening dominates on bare metal and on superstructured hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) substrates. In their Full Paper on page 3330 ff., F. Esch and co-workers explore the fundamental limits of the thermal stability of supported clusters.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Special Issue: Frontiers in Catalysis Research—The Catalysis Research Center of Technische Universität München (pages 3179–3181)

      Prof. Richard W. Fischer and Prof. Notker Rösch

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300830

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      German catalysis with a global reach: With the foundation of the Catalysis Research Center at Technische Universität München in 2008, a platform has been established for the cooperation of researchers to collaborate on a wide range of problems in catalysis research, to form strategic alliances with industry in the area of applied catalysis, and to achieve improved or new technological applications.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Ethane: Common Principles and Mechanistic Aspects (pages 3196–3217)

      Dipl.-Ing. MSc. Christian A. Gärtner, Prof. Dr. André C. van Veen and Prof. Dr. Johannes A. Lercher

      Version of Record online: 19 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200966

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      A great suC[DOUBLE BOND]Cess: The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of ethane is a process that enables the production of ethene with high selectivities. Different catalysts and reactor configurations have been developed for this process. This Review focuses on the mechanistic aspects of heterogeneously catalyzed ODH reactions and the main features and common principles of this reaction are discussed.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Ethanol Oxidation on TiOxCy-Supported Pt Nanoparticles (pages 3219–3223)

      Celine Rüdiger, Jassen Brumbarov, Florian Wiesinger, Silvia Leonardi, Dr. Odysseas Paschos, Dr. Carlos Valero Vidal and Dr. Julia Kunze-Liebhäuser

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300217

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      Plane sailing: Planar TiOxCy films are used as model supports for Pt nanoparticles for ethanol oxidation at 25–80 °C. The highest steady-state current density of Pt on TiOxCy at 80 °C was a factor of 170 higher than that of Pt on glassy carbon.

    2. Charge Transfer across the GaN/Pt Nanoparticle Interface in an Electrolyte (pages 3224–3227)

      Susanne Schäfer, Sonja A. Wyrzgol, Prof. Johannes A. Lercher, Prof. Martin Stutzmann and Dr. Ian D. Sharp

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300070

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      Here today, GaN tomorrow: Charge-transfer pathways on GaN photoelectrodes that were decorated with Pt nanoparticles have been investigated. The surface loading of Pt was found to suppress the surface-state-mediated charge transfer and to enhance the stability of the GaN surface in aqueous electrolyte.

    3. Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation of Diethyl Oxalate and Related Esters (pages 3228–3231)

      Carolin Ziebart, Dr. Ralf Jackstell and Prof. Dr. Matthias Beller

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300209

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      Ruthenium shark takes a bite: Oxalic acid esters are smoothly hydrogenated into either alkyl glycolate or ethylene glycol under mild conditions.

    4. C4-Selective Oxidative Coupling of Thiophenes with Arylboron Compounds: Influence of Solvent Acidity and Boron Substitution (pages 3232–3236)

      Dipl.-Chem. Ingo Schnapperelle and Prof. Dr. Thorsten Bach

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300167

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      A matter of choice: The judicious choice of acidic conditions and the arylboron compound in the oxidative coupling of thiophenes affords high chemo- and regioselectivities, allowing the synthesis of a broad variety of multiply substituted thiophenes.

    5. Catalytic Bio-Supramolecular Photochirogenesis: Batch-Operated Enantiodifferentiating Photocyclodimerization of 2-Anthracenecarboxylate with Human Serum Albumin (pages 3237–3240)

      Dr. Masaki Nishijima, Hanako Kato, Prof. Dr. Cheng Yang, Dr. Gaku Fukuhara, Dr. Tadashi Mori, Dr. Yasuyuki Araki, Prof. Dr. Takehiko Wada and Prof. Dr. Yoshihisa Inoue

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300160

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      Chiral induction: Catalytic bio-supramolecular photochirogenesis is achieved for the enantiodifferentiating [4+4] photocyclodimerization of 2-anthracenecarboxylate by repeatedly using human serum albumin (HSA) as a chiral mediator; the original high enantiomeric excess values (up to 80–90 %) are preserved.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation of Oxygen-Functionalized Aromatic Compounds in Water (pages 3241–3248)

      Dominik Jantke, Dr. Mirza Cokoja, Dr. Markus Drees, Prof. Dr. Dr. Wolfgang A. Herrmann and Prof. Dr. Fritz E. Kühn

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300195

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      Takes like a duck to water: A RuII complex with sulfonated bis-N-heterocyclic carbene ligands is used as precatalyst for the hydrogenation of oxygen-functionalized aromatics in aqueous phase with H2 at 60 °C. Optimization of the catalytic protocol using phenol and acetophenone as model substrates, a broadened substrate scope as well as characterization of the active Ru species before and after catalysis are presented.

    2. Synthesis of Methanethiol from CS2 on Ni-, Co-, and K-Doped MoS2/SiO2 Catalysts (pages 3249–3259)

      Dr. Oliver Y. Gutiérrez, Dr. Liangshu Zhong, Dr. Yongzhong Zhu and Dr. Johannes A. Lercher

      Version of Record online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300210

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      One promoter to rule the MoS2 functionality: CS2 is stepwise but readily reduced to CH4 on MoS2/SiO2. Co-, Ni- or K-doping affects the rate of each reaction step to a varying extent. Ni and Co allow the formation of CH3SH under relatively mild conditions, whereas K slows all reaction steps. Ni is a promising promoter for CH3SH synthesis from CS2 because of its optimal hydrogenation and C[BOND]S bond cleavage functionalities.

    3. Isolated Vanadium Surface Complexes on Aluminum Fluoride - A Model for the Relevance of Oxygen Atoms of Aluminum Oxide Supports in Catalytic Oxidation Reactions (pages 3260–3268)

      Dr. Carmen Haeßner, Dr. Barbara Müller, Dr. Oksana Storcheva and Prof. Dr. Klaus Köhler

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300334

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      Vanadium for victory: The surface of aluminum fluoride, AlF3, contains reactive FH and OH groups. Grafting of suitable precursors leads to isolated mononuclear vanadium(IV)/(V) complexes. These species are neither reducible nor oxidizable at mid-to-high temperatures. In contrast to analogously prepared vanadium species on alumina, VOx/AlF3 is catalytically inactive in oxidation reactions owing to a lack of surface oxygen of the support.

    4. Copolymerisation of Propylene Oxide and Carbon Dioxide by Dinuclear Cobalt Porphyrins (pages 3269–3280)

      Dr. Carly E. Anderson, Dr. Sergei I. Vagin, Markus Hammann, Leander Zimmermann and Prof. Dr. Bernhard Rieger

      Version of Record online: 18 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300307

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      Bye bi… Dinuclear biscobalt porphyrins exhibit no improvement in activity for carbon dioxide–propylene oxide copolymerization compared to their mononuclear analogues. These findings disprove the occurrence of the bimetallic mechanism of polycarbonate chain propagation in the case of cobalt porphyrins.

    5. 2 D Self-Assembly and Catalytic Homo-coupling of the Terminal Alkyne 1,4-Bis(3,5-diethynyl-phenyl)butadiyne-1,3 on Ag(111) (pages 3281–3288)

      Borja Cirera, Dr. Yi-Qi Zhang, Dr. Svetlana Klyatskaya, Prof. Mario Ruben, Dr. Florian Klappenberger and Prof. Johannes V. Barth

      Version of Record online: 12 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300299

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      Custom-designed terminal alkyne carbon compounds at a noble metal surface undergo catalytic homo-coupling reactions eventually yielding extensive reticulated covalent networks. Antecedent self-assembly structures, reaction pathways, and side products were identified by direct tunneling microscopy observation.

    6. Targeted Engineering of Cyclooctat-9-en-7-ol Synthase: A Stereospecific Access to Two New Non-natural Fusicoccane-Type Diterpenes (pages 3289–3298)

      Christian Görner, Ina Häuslein, Patrick Schrepfer, Dr. Wolfgang Eisenreich and Prof. Dr. Thomas Brück

      Version of Record online: 12 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300285

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      German engineering: The structural diversity of diterpenes is due to their variation in core carbon macrocycles. The chemical synthesis of these macrocycles is challenging. However, diterpene cyclases, such as bacterial cyclooctat-9-en-7-ol synthase, generate complex macrocycles in a single step with geranylgeranyl diphosphate as an aliphatic substrate. In silico modelling and targeted enzyme engineering of cyclooctat-9-en-7-ol synthase leads to new macrocycles with potential bioactivities.

    7. Formation of Propane in the Aqueous-Phase Processing of 1-Propanol over Platinum: A DFT Study (pages 3299–3308)

      Cheng-chau Chiu, Dr. Alexander Genest and Prof. Dr. Dr. h. c. Notker Rösch

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300184

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      Propanol hydrodeoxygenation: Alkane formation in the aqueous-phase processing of propanol over platinum is explored computationally. The reaction pathway varies with the acidity of the system. The catalytic reactions can involve acidic protons, the metal catalyst, and the substrate to give rise to various mechanisms.

    8. Aluminum-Catalyzed Hydroalkoxylation at Elevated Temperatures: Fast and Simple Access to Coumarans and Other Oxygen Heterocycles (pages 3309–3315)

      Johannes Schlüter, Max Blazejak and Prof. Dr. Lukas Hintermann

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300182

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      Clear and concise alkoxylation: The cyclization of 2-allylphenols, catalyzed by aluminum isopropoxide (5 mol %) at elevated temperatures (250 °C, 20 min) has proven to be a fast, simple, and cheap approach for the synthesis of 2-methylcoumarans, which are valuable building blocks for pharmaceutically active compounds.

    9. Efficient One-Pot Preparation of Cu-SSZ-13 Materials using Cooperative OSDAs for their Catalytic Application in the SCR of NOx (pages 3316–3323)

      Raquel Martínez-Franco, Dr. Manuel Moliner, Dr. Joakim R. Thogersen and Prof. Avelino Corma

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300141

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      An adamant director! The direct synthesis of Cu-SSZ-13 zeolites with controlled Si/Al ratios and extra-framework cationic Cu species is performed by combining the use of a Cu complex and N,N,N-trimethyl-1-adamantammonium as organic structure-directing agents (OSDAs). Cu-SSZ-13 materials synthesized by using this “one-pot” methodology demonstrate excellent catalytic activities and good hydrothermal stabilities for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx.

    10. Unsaturated NHC Complexes Immobilized by the Backbone: Synthesis and Application (pages 3324–3329)

      Dr. Peng Li, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang A. Herrmann and Prof. Dr. Fritz E. Kühn

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200837

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      Flex that backbone! An SBA-15-supported rhodium–N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalytic complex shows good activity and stability in hydrogenation reactions. Compared to conventional immobilized unsaturated NHC carbene complexes, Rh-NHC is connected to the SBA-15 surface by a linker originating from the backbone of the unsaturated NHC ligand. The catalyst structure maintains two unchanged “wing-tip” ligands on the supported NHC.

    11. Fundamental Insight into the Substrate-Dependent Ripening of Monodisperse Clusters (pages 3330–3341)

      Yves Fukamori, Michael König, Dr. Bokwon Yoon, Dr. Bo Wang, Dr. Friedrich Esch, Prof. Ueli Heiz and Prof. Uzi Landman

      Version of Record online: 13 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300250

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      Close-up on cluster ripening: How supported clusters ripen depends on the interplay between two interactions with the substrate, that is, that of the cluster and that of detached atoms. A suitable substrate allows for increasing the temperature window of cluster stability. This property is shown in the case of monodisperse Pd clusters that are adsorbed onto films with laterally modulated wettability.

    12. Locating Catalytically Active Oxygen on Ag(1 1 1)—A Spectromicroscopy Study (pages 3342–3350)

      Prof. Dr. Sebastian Günther, Dr. Sebastian Böcklein, Prof. Dr. Joost Wintterlin, Dr. Miguel A. Niño, Dr. Tevfik O. Menteş and Dr. Andrea Locatelli

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300355

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      More oxygen! Continuous NO2 dosing on Ag(1 1 1) leads to the sluggish accumulation of an oxygen species, characterized by an O 1s peak at ≈530 eV indicative of the catalytically active oxygen species in the ethylene epoxidation reaction. X-ray photoemission electron microscopy at 530.3 eV evidences the preferential accumulation of this species at step sites (part a). If formation and decay of the Oad-driven Ag surface reconstruction (red O 1s component) is induced by cycled NO2 dosing, the 530 eV oxygen species (blue and green components) accumulates much more efficiently on the surface (part b).

    13. Biocatalytic Synthesis of a Diketobornane as a Building Block for Bifunctional Camphor Derivatives (pages 3351–3357)

      Dr. Michael Hofer, Dr. Harald Strittmatter and Prof. Dr. Volker Sieber

      Version of Record online: 18 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300344

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      Two worlds combined: The linkage of cytochrome P450cam and alcohol dehydrogenase (camD) as biocatalysts together with palladium on carbon and ruthenium on carbon as chemical catalysts allows the synthesis of new bifunctional camphor derivatives.

    14. Nanosized Carbon-Supported Manganese Oxide Phases as Lithium–Oxygen Battery Cathode Catalysts (pages 3358–3373)

      Dr. Cüneyt Kavakli, Dr. Stefano Meini, Gregor Harzer, Dr. Nikolaos Tsiouvaras, Dr. Michele Piana, Armin Siebel, Dr. Arnd Garsuch, Prof. Dr. Hubert A. Gasteiger and Dr. Juan Herranz

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300331

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      The truth behind the film: Manganese oxides are the O2 evolution catalysts of choice in many studies on lithium–air batteries, based on their presumed activity for the oxidation of Li2O2. We show that this catalytic effect is apparent only if Li2O2 is in the form of large particles, unlike the monolayer-thick films produced upon Li-O2 battery discharge. This discrepancy implies that tests with prefilled electrodes should not be regarded as indicative of the catalytic properties of a material in a real Li-O2 cell.

    15. Coupled Enzymatic Alcohol-to-Amine Conversion of Isosorbide using Engineered Transaminases and Dehydrogenases (pages 3374–3383)

      Dr. Alexandra Lerchner, Stefan Achatz, Dr. Christian Rausch, Dr. Thomas Haas and Prof. Arne Skerra

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300284

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      Enzymes get busy! Dehydrogenases and transaminases are engineered to convert the bicyclic dialcohol isosorbide into a diamine in a two-step biocatalytic process, which includes cofactor recycling. The first step of the cascade is established, which opens a biotechnological route to a rigid diamine with potential application for new polymers.

    16. Chain Growth by CO Insertion in the Fischer–Tropsch Reaction (pages 3384–3397)

      Prof. Dr. Rutger A. van Santen and Dr. Albert J. Markvoort

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300173

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      Oh the chain, the chain of it all! Optimal Fischer–Tropsch chain growth through CO insertion (the Pichler–Schulz mechanism) requires the conflicting condition of low and equal rates of CO dissociation as well as hydrocarbon chain growth termination.

    17. Exploring Pretreatment–Morphology Relationships: Ab Initio Wulff Construction for RuO2 Nanoparticles under Oxidising Conditions (pages 3398–3403)

      Tongyu Wang, Dr. Jelena Jelic, Dr. Dirk Rosenthal and Prof. Dr. Karsten Reuter

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300168

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      Who's afraid of the Wulff? First-principles Wulff shapes reveal an intricate dependence of the RuO2 crystal habit on the oxidizing pretreatment used in recent powder catalyst studies.

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