ChemCatChem

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 12

December 2013

Volume 5, Issue 12

Pages 3409–3909

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Tailoring the S-Selectivity of 2-Succinyl-5-enolpyruvyl-6-hydroxy-3-cyclohexene-1-carboxylate Synthase (MenD) from Escherichia coli (ChemCatChem 12/2013) (page 3409)

      Robert Westphal, Doris Hahn, Ursula Mackfeld, Simon Waltzer, Dr. Maryam Beigi, Dr. Michael Widmann, Constantin Vogel, Prof. Jürgen Pleiss, Prof. Michael Müller, Dr. Dörte Rother and Prof. Martina Pohl

      Article first published online: 27 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201390058

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      Stereoselective traffic engineering The cover picture shows how engineered S-selective EcMenD variants catalyze the carboligation of α-ketoglutarate and benzaldehyde derivatives with excellent enantioselectivities of up to 99 % ee S, in contrast to the wild-type enzyme, which produces R-enantiomers. In their Full Paper on p. 3587 ff., M. Pohl et al. describe how they engineer S-selective EcMenD variants by optimizing steric properties and stabilization of the acceptor substrate in the S-pocket. This method, inspired by the recently developed S-pocket concept, involves opening the S-pocket with simultaneous destabilization of the R-pathway to enhance the S-selectivity of thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes.

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      Inside Cover: Asymmetric Reduction of Cyclic Imines Catalyzed by a Whole-Cell Biocatalyst Containing an (S)-Imine Reductase (ChemCatChem 12/2013) (page 3410)

      Dr. Friedemann Leipold, Shahed Hussain, Diego Ghislieri and Prof. Nicholas J. Turner

      Article first published online: 27 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201390059

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      The sharpest enzyme in the box The cover picture shows an Escherichia coli cell containing an over-expressed (S)-imine reductase (IRED) enzyme. In their Communication on p. 3505 ff., F. Leipold et al. describe the development of this engineered whole cell for the asymmetric reduction of a broad range of substituted cyclic 5-, 6-, and 7-membered ring imines to generate the corresponding chiral amines in high yield and enantioselectivity. The whole cell biocatalyst requires only the addition of glucose for cofactor recycling and can be easily generated and used for preparative-scale conversions. Chiral amines are valuable building blocks, for example, as pharmaceutical intermediates, chiral resolving agents, and starting materials for asymmetric syntheses. IRED biocatalysts are thus a valuable addition to the chiral amine biocatalyst toolbox, complementing existing biocatalysts such as transaminases, monoamine oxidases (MAO-N), ammonia lyases, and lipases.

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      Inside Back Cover: Confinement of Metal Nanoparticles in Carbon Nanotubes (ChemCatChem 12/2013) (page 3913)

      Dr. T. Trang Nguyen and Prof. Philippe Serp

      Article first published online: 27 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201390062

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      ACE! The cover picture illustrates the difficulty of developing a synthesis strategy to drive metallic nanoparticles into the inner cavity of carbon nanotubes. In their Full Paper on p. 3595ff., T. T. Nguyen and P. Serp investigate the effect of several parameters, including carbon nanotube pre-treatment and diameter and the effect of the metal, metal precursor, or solvent on the filling yield of metallic nanoparticles in the carbon nanotube channel. The impact of the confinement of the active phase on the activity and selectivity of the produced catalysts for cinnamaldehyde hydrogenation is also reported.

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      Back Cover: Core–Shell Nanocatalyst Design by Combining High-Throughput Experiments and First-Principles Simulations (ChemCatChem 12/2013) (page 3914)

      Dr. Nageswara Rao Peela, Dr. Weiqing Zheng, Dr. Ivan C. Lee, Dr. Ayman M. Karim and Prof. Dionisios G. Vlachos

      Article first published online: 27 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201390063

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      Bimetallic catalyst design: where brain meets brawn The cover picture represents a methodology to design bimetallic catalysts by synergistically combining high-throughput experiments and quantum mechanical calculations. A robotic arm is used to represent the high-throughput experimentation system. In their Full Paper on p. 3712 ff., N. R. Peela et al. demonstrate the details of the methodology. Ag-Pd bimetallic catalysts are found to be the best catalysts for the propane total oxidation reaction. Owing to its generic nature, the methodology can be used for designing catalysts for any vapor-phase metal-catalyzed reaction. This artwork was created by using images from Presenter Media.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemCatChem 12/2013 (pages 3411–3428)

      Article first published online: 27 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201390060

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
  4. Reviews

    1. Top of page
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    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
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      Z Selectivity: Recent Advances in one of the Current Major Challenges of Olefin Metathesis (pages 3436–3459)

      Dr. Saurabh Shahane, Dr. Christian Bruneau and Dr. Cédric Fischmeister

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300688

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      CatalyZe it! Advances in selective synthesis of (Z)-olefins by using olefin metathesis are reviewed. We begin with the early steps in Z-selective synthetic strategies, in which emphasis is placed on recent developments in the design of Z-selective olefin metathesis catalysts and their applications in the synthesis of natural products.

    2. Polymer- and Ionic Liquid-Containing Palladium: Recoverable Soluble Cross-Coupling Catalysts (pages 3460–3480)

      Dr. Sergio Navalón, Prof. Mercedes Álvaro and Prof. Hermenegildo García

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300339

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      A bridge over troubled catalysis: One major drawback of homogeneous, recoverable systems is the poor stability of palladium complexes. This review describes strategies to develop palladium complexes anchored to soluble polymers and ionic liquids and shows the advantages and limitations of this approach to develop recyclable palladium catalysts.

  5. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. CO2 Activation and Catalysis Driven by Iridium Complexes (pages 3481–3494)

      Dr. Francisco J. Fernández-Alvarez, Dr. Manuel Iglesias, Prof. Luis A. Oro and Dr. Víctor Polo

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300559

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      CO2 activation: The interaction of iridium complexes with carbon dioxide and subsequent homogeneous catalytic processes reported so far are reviewed. In general, outer-sphere mechanisms seem to prevail in the catalytic functionalization of carbon dioxide by iridium complexes.

  6. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Access to Alternative Regioisomers for Palladium-Catalysed Direct Arylations of (Benzo)thiophenes (pages 3495–3496)

      Kedong Yuan and Dr. Henri Doucet

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300533

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      Take from the rich to give to the poor: An heterogeneous Pd catalyst associated to 10 mol % CuCl allows to arylate at C3 of benzo[b]thiophenes using aryl chlorides as the coupling partners, without additional ligands or directing groups. An excellent C3/C2 selectivity was obtained, using electron-rich, electron-poor and also sterically encumbered aryl chlorides.

    2. Optically Active Allenes from an Allylic Substitution/Isomerization Sequence (pages 3497–3498)

      Wenhan Zhang and Prof. Joseph M. Ready

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300663

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      It takes two to trisubstitute: A two-step procedure involving enantioselective allylic alkylation followed by 1,3 hydrogen shift enables the catalytic asymmetric synthesis of trisubstituted allenes.

    3. Remote 1,6-Stereocontrol by Iminium-mediated Organocatalytic Events (pages 3499–3501)

      Prof. Dr. Martin J. Lear and Prof. Dr. Yujiro Hayashi

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300590

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      Control freaks: Chiral amine catalysts prove to be highly proficient mediators in the asymmetric, polyconjugate addition of C-, N-, and S-based nucleophiles to acyclic dienals and cyclic dienones. For high 1,6-selectivities, the stereo spatial matching of the molecular orbitals and ionic charges of the reacting species are key. But can we widen the scope and how far can we go with remote, iminium-stereocontrol?

    4. A New Remote Control for Traceless meta-C[BOND]H Olefination of Phenols (pages 3502–3503)

      Dr. Claudio Martínez and Prof. Dr. Kilian Muñiz

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300538

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      Ghosting the directing group: A clever design of a nitrile based catalyst directing group, serves as tool in the palladium-catalyzed meta-olefination of phenol derivatives. This group can be removed tracelessly, thus providing a convenient route to meta-substitution of phenols, a transformation that cannot be conducted by classic aromatic substitution chemistry.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Asymmetric Reduction of Cyclic Imines Catalyzed by a Whole-Cell Biocatalyst Containing an (S)-Imine Reductase (pages 3505–3508)

      Dr. Friedemann Leipold, Shahed Hussain, Diego Ghislieri and Prof. Nicholas J. Turner

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300539

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      Biocatalytic imine reduction: A whole-cell recombinant E. coli system, producing an (S)-selective imine reductase (IRED) from Streptomyces sp. GF3546, is developed. This biocatalyst is used for the enantioselective reduction of a broad range of substrates such as dihydroisoquinolines and dihydro-β-carbolines as well as iminium ions.

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      Very Small (3–6 Atoms) Gold Cluster Catalyzed Carbon–Carbon and Carbon–Heteroatom Bond-Forming Reactions in Solution (pages 3509–3515)

      Judit Oliver-Meseguer, Dr. Antonio Leyva-Pérez and Prof. Avelino Corma

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300695

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      Clusters get the gold: Atomic gold clusters Aun (n=3–6) are very active species (sub-mol %) for gold-catalyzed carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bond-forming reactions of interest in organic synthesis. The gold clusters can be formed in situ or generated ex situ and introduced into the reaction media. Salts, complexes, and nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as a starting source of gold. Ts=para-toluenesulfonyl.

    3. Catalytic Asymmetric Arylation of Enals to Enantioenriched Linear Trisubstituted Allylic Secondary Alcohols by using Aryl Lithiums Generated In Situ from Aryl Bromides (pages 3516–3519)

      Lei Zhang, Lin Sun, Yu-Yan Li, Yue Liu, Yong-Xin Yang, Rui Yuan, Pei Wang and Prof. Dr. Chao-Shan Da

      Article first published online: 18 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300655

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      Opening an enantio account: Reactive aryl lithiums generated in situ from aryl bromides are added asymmetrically to α-substituted aryl enals to yield enantioenriched linear terminal diaryl trisubstituted secondary allylic alcohols. The combination of tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA), AlCl3, and Ti(OiPr)4 contributes to the high enantioselectivity with (S)-H8-BINOL as the ideal chiral ligand.

    4. Catalytic Bromine Recovery: An Enabling Technology for Emerging Alkane Functionalization Processes (pages 3520–3523)

      Maximilian Moser, Laura Rodríguez-García, Amol P. Amrute and Prof. Javier Pérez-Ramírez

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300609

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      Making a quick recovery: The widespread implementation of bromination reactions to manufacture value-added products is contingent upon the development of sustainable and cost-effective means to recycle copious amounts of HBr byproduct. We report families of heterogeneous catalysts for the full recovery of Br2 through HBr oxidation that display unprecedented low-temperature activity and stability.

    5. An Enzymatic Toolbox for Cascade Reactions: A Showcase for an In Vivo Redox Sequence in Asymmetric Synthesis (pages 3524–3528)

      Nikolin Oberleitner, Christin Peters, Jan Muschiol, Dr. Maria Kadow, Stefan Saß, Thomas Bayer, Patricia Schaaf, Dr. Naseem Iqbal, Dr. Florian Rudroff, Prof. Dr. Marko D. Mihovilovic and Prof. Dr. Uwe T. Bornscheuer

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300604

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      Joined forces: Alcohol dehydrogenase, enoate reductase, and Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase are combined in a cascade reaction by coexpression in E. coli to have a recombinant whole-cell biocatalyst. Such an artificial metabolic “mini”-pathway provides access to functionalized chiral compounds in high yields and optical purities as exemplified for kinetic resolutions, desymmetrizations, and regiodivergent biotransformations.

    6. Efficient Biocatalysis with Immobilized Enzymes or Encapsulated Whole Cell Microorganism by Using the SpinChem Reactor System (pages 3529–3532)

      Hendrik Mallin, Jan Muschiol, Dr. Emil Byström and Prof. Dr. Uwe T. Bornscheuer

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300599

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      The chambers of Trivial Pursuit: Locking immobilized enzymes or encapsulated whole cells into a compartment that is connected to the stirrer enables efficient reactions and facilitates the reuse of biocatalysts by using this SpinChem system. R-ATA=(R)-amine transaminase.

    7. Zero-Order Catechol Oxidase Activity by a Mononuclear Manganese(III) Complex Showing High Turnover Comparable to Catechol Oxidase Enzyme (pages 3533–3537)

      Suman Kr Dey and Dr. Arindam Mukherjee

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300596

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      Stand aside, potatoes! A mononuclear manganese(III) complex [MnIII(L)2(OAc)(AcOH)] (1) exhibits catechol oxidation in the presence of molecular oxygen by generation of a hydroxyl radical with a turnover number of the same order as that of catechol oxidase from sweet potatoes.

    8. Biocatalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Unnatural Amino Acids through the Cascade Transfer of Amino Groups from Primary Amines onto Keto Acids (pages 3538–3542)

      Eul-Soo Park, Joo-Young Dong and Prof. Dr. Jong-Shik Shin

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300571

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      Flee to the hills: An unfavorable equilibrium in the amino group transfer between amino acids and keto acids catalyzed by α-transaminases was successfully overcome by coupling with a ω-transaminase reaction as an equilibrium shifter, leading to efficient asymmetric synthesis of diverse unnatural amino acids, including L-tert-leucine and D-phenylglycine.

    9. A Highly Active Ni/ZSM-5 Catalyst for Complete Hydrogenation of Polymethylbenzenes (pages 3543–3547)

      Shi-Chao Qi, Prof. Xian-Yong Wei, Prof. Zhi-Min Zong, Prof. Jun-ichiro Hayashi, Prof. Xin-Hua Yuan and Prof. Lin-Bing Sun

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300547

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      Amazing the crowd: A highly dispersive supported nickel catalyst is prepared by in situ decomposition of Ni(CO)4 over ZSM-5 zeolite. The catalyst displays an amazing activity for complete hydrogenation of polymethylbenzenes which are extremely difficult to be saturated.

    10. Isomerization During Olefin Metathesis: An Assessment of Potential Catalyst Culprits (pages 3548–3551)

      Carolyn S. Higman, Lucie Plais and Prof. Deryn E. Fogg

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300886

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      It wasn't me: Two Ru hydrides thought to trigger double-bond migration during olefin metathesis are examined for their isomerization activity. Neither can account for the high levels of undesired isomerization seen during self-metathesis of estragole, a model allylbenzene substrate. Higher activity is found to correlate with a less electron-rich Ru center.

    11. Pushing Back the Limits of Hydrosilylation: Unprecedented Catalytic Reduction of Organic Ureas to Formamidines (pages 3552–3556)

      Dr. Jacky Pouessel, Dr. Olivier Jacquet and Dr. Thibault Cantat

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300653

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      Pushing back the limits: A novel catalytic transformation has been designed to prepare formamidine derivatives by reduction of substituted ureas with hydrosilanes. Simple iron catalysts based on commercially available iron salts and phosphine ligands prove to be highly active in promoting this new hydrosilylation reaction.

    12. Confined Au-Pd Ensembles in Mesoporous TiO2 Spheres for the Photocatalytic Oxidation of Acetaldehyde (pages 3557–3561)

      Fenglong Wang, Dr. Yijiao Jiang, Dr. Xiaoming Wen, Dr. Junhai Xia, Dr. Gang Sha and Prof. Rose Amal

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300584

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      An ensemble cast: The confinement of ensembles of Au-Pd inside unique mesoporous TiO2 spheres contributes to their superior photocatalytic activity. Direct spectroscopic evidence reveals that the addition of palladium could suppress the growth of gold nanoclusters and prolong the lifetime of the excited electrons on these nanoclusters, thereby resulting in enhanced photoactivity.

    13. Hierarchical Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework-8 Catalyst for Monoglyceride Synthesis (pages 3562–3566)

      Dr. Lik H. Wee, Tristan Lescouet, Jayashree Ethiraj, Dr. Francesca Bonino, Dr. Roxana Vidruk, Dr. Eva Garrier, Dr. Dirk Packet, Prof. Silvia Bordiga, Dr. David Farrusseng, Prof. Moti Herskowitz and Prof. Johan A. Martens

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300581

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      NanoMOF: Hierarchical zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) nanocrystals catalyze esterification of glycerol with oleic acid at low temperature and become hierarchical (see TEM micrograph) upon local transformation of the framework.

    14. Deoxydehydration of Glycols Catalyzed by Carbon-Supported Perrhenate (pages 3567–3570)

      Alana L. Denning, Huong Dang, Dr. Zhimin Liu, Prof. Dr. Kenneth M. Nicholas and Prof. Dr. Friederike C. Jentoft

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300545

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      Support group: The first heterogeneous catalyst for the deoxydehydration (DODH) of glycols into olefins is reported. A carbon-supported perrhenate material was found to catalyze the reductive conversions of styrene diol, tetradecane diol, and diethyl tartrate into their respective olefins with high chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivity. Effective reductants for this DODH reaction include H2, alcohols, and tetralin.

    15. Direct Reductive Amination of Aldehydes Catalyzed by Carbon Nanotube/Gold Nanohybrids (pages 3571–3575)

      Rahul Kumar, Dr. Edmond Gravel, Dr. Agnès Hagège, Dr. Haiyan Li, Dr. Deepti Verma, Prof. Dr. Irishi N. N. Namboothiri and Dr. Eric Doris

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300490

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      Gold digger: The direct reductive amination of aldehydes catalyzed by gold/carbon-nanotube nanohybrids with a silane as a hydride source is reported.

    16. Iodine-ion-induced Size-tunable Co3O4 Nanowires and the Size-dependent Catalytic Performance for CO Oxidation (pages 3576–3581)

      Yaguang Li, Prof. Dr. Liping Zhu, Yanmin Guo, Dr. Jie Jiang, Liang Hu, Zhen Wen, Dr. Luwei Sun and Prof. Dr. Zhizhen Ye

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300444

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      Pick on someone your own size: Size-tunable Co3O4 nanowires, prepared through an iodine-ion-mediated hydrothermal synthesis, were found to be excellent catalysts for CO oxidation. By controlling the dimensions of the nanowires the catalytic activity for CO oxidation could be tuned.

    17. Air-Promoted Adsorptive Desulfurization over Ti0.9Ce0.1O2 Mixed Oxides from Diesel Fuel under Ambient Conditions (pages 3582–3586)

      Jing Xiao, Siddarth Sitamraju, Prof. Yongsheng Chen, Prof. Michael Janik and Prof. Chunshan Song

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300329

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      In the air tonight: High adsorptive desulfurization capacity of commercial diesel was achieved by using TiO2-CeO2 mixed-oxide adsorbents with the addition of air. Density functional theory elucidated a cyclic adsorption process, in which surface-oxygen vacancies on the Ti0.9Ce0.1O2 surface served as active sites.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Minireview
    7. Highlights
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Tailoring the S-Selectivity of 2-Succinyl-5-enolpyruvyl-6-hydroxy-3-cyclohexene-1-carboxylate Synthase (MenD) from Escherichia coli (pages 3587–3594)

      Robert Westphal, Doris Hahn, Ursula Mackfeld, Simon Waltzer, Dr. Maryam Beigi, Dr. Michael Widmann, Constantin Vogel, Prof. Jürgen Pleiss, Prof. Michael Müller, Dr. Dörte Rother and Prof. Martina Pohl

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300318

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      Stereoselective traffic engineering: A step-by-step design of the active site of 2-succinyl-5-enolpyruvyl-6-hydroxy-3-cyclohexene-1-carboxylate synthase from Escherichia coli enabled the R-pathway to be selectively hindered, which pushed catalysis towards the desired (S)-5-hydroxy-4-oxo-5-arylpentanoates with up to 99 % enantiomeric excess.

    2. Confinement of Metal Nanoparticles in Carbon Nanotubes (pages 3595–3603)

      Dr. T. Trang Nguyen and Prof. Philippe Serp

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300527

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      Are you in? Most of the studies that deal with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for catalysis neglect the possibility of confinement of the active phase in the CNT inner cavity. This study should prompt researchers who study CNT-supported metal catalysts to integrate the possibility of confinement effects to rationalize catalytic results.

    3. Oxidative Additions of Aryl Halides to Palladium Proceed through the Monoligated Complex (pages 3604–3609)

      Dr. Krista Vikse, Tsuki Naka, Prof. Dr. J. Scott McIndoe, Dr. Maria Besora and Prof. Dr. Feliu Maseras

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300723

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      Seeing the real catalyst: A combination of mass spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations on the reactivity of halobenzenes with mono- and bisligated palladium complexes allows a direct comparison of energy barriers to the oxidative addition process, and, consequently a direct peek into the intrinsic reactivity of the metal complexes.

    4. Morphology Effect of CeO2 Support in the Preparation, Metal–Support Interaction, and Catalytic Performance of Pt/CeO2 Catalysts (pages 3610–3620)

      Yuxian Gao, Prof. Dr. Wendong Wang, Sujie Chang and Prof. Dr. Weixin Huang

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300709

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      Get Ce-rious: Pt/CeO2 catalysts that employ CeO2 cubes, rods, and octahedra as the support exhibit a strong morphology effect on the Pt precursor–CeO2 interaction, Pt–CeO2 interaction, structure, and catalytic performance. The catalytic performance of various Pt/CeO2 catalysts in CO oxidation and the preferential oxidation of CO in a H2-rich gas (PROX) follows the order Pt/CeO2-rods> Pt/CeO2-cubes> Pt/CeO2-octahedra.

    5. Calcium Oxide Supported on Monoclinic Zirconia as a Highly Active Solid Base Catalyst (pages 3621–3628)

      Dr. Anne Mette Frey, Tomas van Haasterecht, Prof. Krijn P. de Jong and Prof. Dr. Johannes Hendrik Bitter

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300676

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      Look at the strong base! If prepared in an optimized way, CaO/ZrO2 is a highly active solid base catalyst. Calcination temperature and the preparation method (impregnation or deposition) have a strong influence on the number of strong base sites, which correlate positively with the activity of the material.

    6. Chemoselective Hydrogenation Catalyzed by Pd on Spherical Carbon (pages 3629–3635)

      Dr. Hiroyoshi Esaki, Tomohiro Hattori, Aya Tsubone, Satoko Mibayashi, Dr. Takao Sakata, Dr. Yoshinari Sawama, Dr. Yasunari Monguchi, Prof. Dr. Hidehiro Yasuda, Prof. Dr. Kazuto Nosaka and Prof. Dr. Hironao Sajiki

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300639

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      Highly selective spheres: The chemoselective hydrogenation of C[BOND]C multiple bonds, azides, nitro groups, and aliphatic O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBS) ethers is achieved in the presence of benzyl esters, benzyl ethers, nitriles, aromatic ketones, N-carbobenzyloxy (Cbz) protective groups, and aromatic O-TBS ethers by a novel heterogeneous palladium catalyst supported on spherical carbon (0.5 % Pd/SC).

    7. Polymer Resin Supported Cobalt–Salen Catalysts: Role of Co(II) Salen Species in the Regioselective Ring Opening of 1,2-Epoxyhexane with Methanol (pages 3636–3643)

      Dr. Yan Feng, Dr. Megan E. Lydon and Dr. Christopher W. Jones

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300578

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      Cobalt(II)? Yes, it can! Co–salen complexes supported on a highly cross-linked polymer resin are synthesized, characterized, and utilized as catalysts for the ring opening of 1,2-epoxyhexane with methanol. Both CoIII and CoII salen species play a role in the reaction, which is kinetically approximately 0.1 order in CoII species.

    8. Quantification of Brønsted Acid Sites of Grafted Amorphous Silica–Alumina Compounds and their Turnover Frequency in m-Xylene Isomerization (pages 3644–3656)

      Dr. Maxime Caillot, Dr. Alexandra Chaumonnot, Dr. Mathieu Digne and Prof. Dr. Jeroen A. Van Bokhoven

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300560

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      Multifaceted γ-alumina: Under mild conditions, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) is first deposited on the (1 0 0) surface of γ-alumina, and then on the (1 1 0) surface. The latter step enables the formation of Brønsted acid sites upon calcination, which are less active than those present in an H-USY zeolite.

    9. Bimetallic–Organic Framework as a Zero-Leaching Catalyst in the Aerobic Oxidation of Cyclohexene (pages 3657–3664)

      Dr. Ying-Ya Liu, Dr. Karen Leus, Thomas Bogaerts, Prof. Dr. Karen Hemelsoet, Dr. Els Bruneel, Prof. Dr. Veronique Van Speybroeck and Prof. Dr. Pascal Van Der Voort

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300529

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      MOF with claws: COMOC-4, a gallium-based metal–organic framework is synthesized, which contains open bipyridine sites on which CuCl2 is anchored. The catalytic performance of Cu2+@COMOC-4 is evaluated for the aerobic oxidation of cyclohexene. The bimetallic–organic framework shows an excellent selectivity towards cyclohexene oxide and has good stability and reusability.

    10. Selective Adsorption of Manganese onto Rhodium for Optimized Mn/Rh/SiO2 Alcohol Synthesis Catalysts (pages 3665–3672)

      Jingjing Liu, Runzhe Tao, Zhao Guo, Prof. John R. Regalbuto, Dr. Christopher L. Marshall, Prof. Robert F. Klie, Dr. Jeffrey T. Miller and Prof. Randall J. Meyer

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300479

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      Stronger interactions: A key design objective in promoted catalysts synthesis is to increase the promoter–metal interactions to maximize the promotion effectiveness, and this intimate interaction can be achieved by the strong electrostatic adsorption synthesis method. With stronger promoter (Mn)–metal (Rh) interactions, enhanced ethanol production is also achieved. PZC=Point of zero charge.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: Selective Adsorption of Manganese onto Rhodium for Optimized Mn/Rh/SiO2 Alcohol Synthesis Catalysts

      Vol. 6, Issue 7, 1817–1818, Article first published online: 14 JUL 2014

    11. Tuning the Catalytic Selectivity of Copper Using TiO2: Water-Gas Shift versus CO Oxidation (pages 3673–3679)

      Dr. Hyun You Kim and Dr. Ping Liu

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300449

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      Dancing to copper's tune: The deposited TiO2 can tune the selectivity of Cu toward CO oxidation but the water–gas shift reaction is energetically not favorable. Such selectivity toward CO oxidation is associated with the unique chemical nature of the TiO2[BOND]Cu interface under the reaction conditions, in which the active sites are selective to O2, CO, and H2O.

    12. Polypyrrole-Modified-Carbon-Supported Ru-Pt Nanoparticles as Highly Methanol-Tolerant Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen-Reduction Reaction (pages 3680–3689)

      Ricardo Escudero Cid, Dr. José Luis Gómez de la Fuente, Dr. Sergio Rojas, Dr. José Luis García Fierro and Dr. Pilar Ocón

      Article first published online: 16 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300448

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      With ORR without you: A carbon-supported Ru-Pt electrocatalyst exhibits superior methanol tolerance than Pt/C during the oxygen-reduction reaction, thus leading to more active and durable direct methanol fuel cells. Modification of the carbon support with polypyrrole allows for better dispersion of the Ru-Pt nanoparticles.

    13. Density Functional Theory and Reaction Kinetics Studies of the Water–Gas Shift Reaction on Pt–Re Catalysts (pages 3690–3699)

      Ronald Carrasquillo-Flores, Dr. Jean Marcel R. Gallo, Dr. Konstanze Hahn, Prof. James A. Dumesic and Prof. Manos Mavrikakis

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300365

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      ReOx decorations in a Pt surface: Pt–Re alloys show high activity for low-temperature water–gas shift reactions. Pt atoms serve as the adsorption site for CO molecules, whereas the Re atoms are determined to be in an oxidized state; they act as a promoter for the reaction, by destabilizing the CO molecules.

    14. High-Temperature Sulfur Removal from Biomass-Derived Synthesis Gas over Bifunctional Molybdenum Catalysts (pages 3700–3711)

      Christian F. J. König, Patrick Schuh, Dr. Tilman J. Schildhauer and Dr. Maarten Nachtegaal

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300185

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      Removal protocol: Molybdenum-based catalysts are efficient for the removal of H2S and organic sulfur species from gasified biomass at high temperatures. Water, which is ubiquitous in biomass, impedes desulfurization. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis shows that H2S is removed from the biomass-derived producer gas through the sulfidation of MoO3 to MoS2, whereas MoO2 is the active phase for the removal of thiophene.

    15. Core–Shell Nanocatalyst Design by Combining High-Throughput Experiments and First-Principles Simulations (pages 3712–3718)

      Dr. Nageswara Rao Peela, Dr. Weiqing Zheng, Dr. Ivan C. Lee, Dr. Ayman M. Karim and Prof. Dionisios G. Vlachos

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300553

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      A rational synergy: Despite significant research efforts, designing bimetallic catalysts rationally remains a challenge. We combine the strengths of high-throughput experiments and DFT calculations synergistically to design core–shell bimetallic catalysts. This is applied to propane total oxidation and shows the Ag[BOND]Pd catalyst to be the most active. This rational methodology will help design bimetallic catalysts for metal-catalyzed reactions.

    16. Transesterifications and Peracid-Assisted Oxidations in Aqueous Media Catalyzed by Mycobacterium smegmatis Acyl Transferase (pages 3719–3724)

      Lotte Wiermans, Sebastian Hofzumahaus, Christiane Schotten, Lisa Weigand, Marcus Schallmey, Dr. Anett Schallmey and Dr. Pablo Domínguez de María

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300683

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      Challenging thermodynamics? As a result of its highly hydrophobic active site, an acyl transferase from Mycobacterium smegmatis catalyzes synthetic reactions in buffer in which other hydrolases could only conduct hydrolysis. Among several options, opportunities for downstream processing, enantioselective (multistep) aqueous syntheses, and peracid-mediated epoxidations and oxidations are envisaged.

    17. Effects of Polyvinylpyrrolidone on the Preparation of Supported La2O3 Catalysts by a Modified Impregnation Method for the Oxidative Coupling of Methane (pages 3725–3735)

      Yu-Hui Hou, Yin-Liang Lin, Qi Li, Prof. Wei-Zheng Weng, Wen-Sheng Xia and Hui-Lin Wan

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300667

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      Disperse and couple! The addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) into an impregnated solution can effectively increase the dispersion of active components during the preparation of the supported catalysts; the acid–base properties of the supports have great influences on the selectivity for the oxidative coupling of methane. MO=Metal oxide.

    18. Acid-Activated Carbon Materials: Cheaper Alternative Catalysts for the Synthesis of Substituted Quinolines (pages 3736–3742)

      Jesús López-Sanz, Dr. Elena Pérez-Mayoral, Dr. Elena Soriano, Delia Omenat-Morán, Dr. Carlos J. Durán, Prof. Rosa María Martín-Aranda, Dr. Ines Matos and Dr. Isabel Fonseca

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300626

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      Freeloading on the Friedländer: Acidic microporous activated carbon materials containing sulfonic acid groups can be considered environmentally friendly and cheaper catalytic alternatives for the Friedländer reaction compared to traditional acidic solids such as zeolites or even mesoporous silicates. The textural characteristics of the most efficient materials determine the parameters for the conversion and selectivity of the reaction.

    19. Facial Preparation of Sulfonic Acid-Functionalized Magnetite-Coated Maghemite as a Magnetically Separable Catalyst for Pyrrole Synthesis (pages 3743–3749)

      Hajar Mahmoudi and Prof. Abbas Ali Jafari

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300623

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      Magnetic aura: The catalytic application of sulfonic acid-functionalized magnetite-coated maghemite as a powerful magnetically separable catalyst in pyrrole synthesis has been investigated. The catalyst can be recovered and reused several times in Paal–Knorr and Clauson–Kaas reactions.

    20. Silver Nanoparticles for Olefin Production: New Insights into the Mechanistic Description of Propyne Hydrogenation (pages 3750–3759)

      Gianvito Vilé, Dr. David Baudouin, Prof. Ioannis N. Remediakis, Prof. Christophe Copéret, Prof. Núria López and Prof. Javier Pérez-Ramírez

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300569

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      The money metal! Silver selectively catalyzes the hydrogenation of propyne to propene, and the activity is maximal over 4.5 nm nanoparticles. The rate of propene production correlates well with the density of B5 sites, which suggests that the latter are potential active centers in the reaction. The hydrogenation follows an associative scheme, featuring the activation of H2 directly on the propyne–silver-surface intermediates.

    21. XAFS Study on the Specific Deoxidation Behavior of Iron Titanate Catalyst for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3 (pages 3760–3769)

      Dr. Fudong Liu, Prof. Hong He and Lijuan Xie

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300565

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      Living on the iron edge: The deoxidation behavior of an environmentally friendly iron titanate catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 is systematically studied by H2 temperature-programmed reduction and X-ray absorption fine-structure methods. The significantly enhanced reducibility and redox ability of Fe species in the unique edge-shared Fe3+[BOND](O)2[BOND]Ti4+ structure improves the NOx reduction efficiency at low temperatures.

    22. Platinum Ruthenium Catalysts Supported on Carbon Xerogel for Methanol Electro-Oxidation: Influence of the Catalyst Synthesis Method (pages 3770–3780)

      Cinthia Alegre, Dr. María Elena Gálvez, Dr. Rafael Moliner, Dr. Vincenzo Baglio, Dr. Alessandro Stassi, Dr. Antonino Salvatore Aricò and Dr. María Jesús Lázaro

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300542

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      From xero to hero: The effect of different synthesis methods on the characteristics of PtRu catalysts supported on carbon xerogels is studied and methanol oxidation activity (expressed in terms of mass activity) is analyzed. The impregnation method and reduction with HCOOH renders the highest catalytic activity, owing to larger crystal sizes and more surface Pt. Catalytic activity results from the appropriate combination of crystal size and Pt/Ru atomic ratio.

    23. Highly Active and Stable Lanthanum-doped Core–Shell-structured Ni@SiO2 Catalysts for the Partial Oxidation of Methane to Syngas (pages 3781–3787)

      Lei Li, Yao Yao, Bo Sun, Zhaoyang Fei, Hao Xia, Jing Zhao, Prof. Dr. Weijie Ji and Prof. Dr. Chak-Tong Au

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300537

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      Nickel to the core! Ni@SiO2 doped with La has an enhanced CH4 conversion and syngas selectivity. The La2O3 species, which is distributed uniformly throughout the NiO cores, can reduce the aggregation of NiO or Ni0 core particles. The La2O3 species can effectively enhance the resistance of Ni cores toward surface coking, which makes the catalyst more durable.

    24. Silicon Nanowire Arrays – A New Catalyst for the Reduction of Nitrobenzene Derivatives (pages 3788–3793)

      Yajun Xu, Lei Wang, Wenwen Jiang, Dr. Hongwei Wang, Prof. Jianlin Yao, Qinghua Guo, Prof. Lin Yuan and Prof. Hong Chen

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300480

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      No need to be noble: Hydrogen fluoride-treated silicon nanowire arrays (H-SiNWAs) are an efficient, recyclable catalyst for the chemical reduction of nitrobenzene derivatives. The activity of H-SiNWAs is because of the presence of Si[BOND]H bonds and the length of the nanowires.

    25. Studies of Cobalt Particle Size Effects on Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis over Core–Shell-Structured Catalysts (pages 3794–3801)

      Bo Zeng, Bo Hou, Litao Jia, Jungang Wang, Congbiao Chen, Prof. Yuhan Sun and Prof. Debao Li

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300471

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      Core–shell model catalysts: Catalytic activity and product selectivity are found to be particle-size dependent in Fischer–Tropsch synthesis, which is studied by using core–shell model catalysts with different-sized Co cores directly coated by porous silica shells.

    26. Efficient Ruthenium Nanocatalysts in Liquid–Liquid Biphasic Hydrogenation Catalysis: Towards a Supramolecular Control through a Sulfonated Diphosphine–Cyclodextrin Smart Combination (pages 3802–3811)

      Dr. Miguel Guerrero, Dr. Yannick Coppel, Dr. Nguyet Tran Thanh Chau, Prof. Alain Roucoux, Dr. Audrey Denicourt-Nowicki, Prof. Eric Monflier, Dr. Hervé Bricout, Dr. Pierre Lecante and Dr. Karine Philippot

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300467

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      Getting smarter every day: The use of a sulfonated diphosphine with randomly methylated-β-cyclodextrin leads to very stable water-soluble ruthenium nanoparticles that display pertinent catalytic performances in hydrogenation of unsaturated substrates with a supramolecular control effect of the cyclodextrin.

    27. Fabrication, Characterization, and Photoelectrochemical Properties of Cu-Doped PbTiO3 and Its Hydrogen Production Activity (pages 3812–3820)

      K. Hemalata Reddy and Dr. Kulamani Parida

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300462

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      All doped up: Improved hydrogen production activity of Cu-doped PbTiO3 is associated with the fact that its conduction band minimum is more negatively shifted than that of neat PbTiO3 and is also associated with the lower recombination rate of electron–hole pairs. CB=conduction band, VB=valence band. Eg=band gap energy.

    28. Second-Generation Amino Acid Furanoside Based Ligands from D-Glucose for the Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Ketones (pages 3821–3828)

      Dr. Mercedes Coll, Dr. Oscar Pàmies, Prof. Hans Adolfsson and Prof. Montserrat Diéguez

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300456

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      The next generation: High enantioselectivities are achieved in the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of a wide range of aryl alkyl ketones by using catalysts generated in situ from [RhCl2Cp*]2 (Cp*=C5Me5) and thioamide ligands prepared from commercial α-amino acids and D-glucose. The good performance extends to a very challenging class of industrially interesting heteroaromatic ketones. Boc=tert-butoxycarbonyl, Bz=benzoyl.

    29. Support-Induced Oxidation State of Catalytic Ru Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanofibers that were Doped with Heteroatoms (O, N) for the Decomposition of NH3 (pages 3829–3834)

      Yanila Marco, Dr. Laura Roldán, Dr. Sabino Armenise and Dr. Enrique García-Bordejé

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300455

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      What a state of affairs: High NH3-decomposition conversions were obtained at low temperatures by using a supported Ru catalyst on a honeycomb monolith that was coated with N-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNF). The higher negative charge on the Ru center accounted for its enhanced performance compared to its un-doped CNF-supported counterpart.

    30. Phosphite-driven Self-sufficient Cytochrome P450 (pages 3835–3840)

      Hiroshi Watanabe, Dr. Hidehiko Hirakawa and Prof. Teruyuki Nagamune

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300445

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      I′ll catch a greNADe for you: Cytochrome P450-catalyzed monooxygenations are driven by electrons from reductants. An archaeal PCNA-based protein complex of a bacterial P450, a ferredoxin, a ferredoxin reductase, and a phosphite dehydrogenase can catalyze a monooxygenation with phosphite because reducing power is transmitted from phosphite to the P450 through NAD+, the ferredoxin reductase and the ferredoxin in series.

    31. Photocatalytic Activity and Selectivity of ZnO Materials in the Decomposition of Organic Compounds (pages 3841–3846)

      Dr. Feng Lin, Dr. Bogdan Cojocaru, Chia-Ling Chou, Dr. Christopher A. Cadigan, Yazhou Ji, Dr. Dennis Nordlund, Dr. Tsu-Chien Weng, Prof. Dr. Zhifeng Zheng, Prof. Dr. Vasile I. Pârvulescu and Prof. Dr. Ryan M. Richards

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300440

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      Active and selective? The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue and phenol were performed on ZnO and Li-doped ZnO materials. The doping-induced surface-defect states were shown to modify the photocatalytic activity and selectivity of the ZnO material.

    32. Heterogenisation of a C-Scorpionate FeII Complex on Carbon Materials for Cyclohexane Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide (pages 3847–3856)

      Dr. L. M. D. R. S. Martins, M. Peixoto de Almeida, Dr. S. A. C. Carabineiro, Prof. J. L. Figueiredo and Prof. A. J. L. Pombeiro

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300432

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      An iron scorpion: A C-scorpionate FeII complex is heterogenized on carbon materials and used for peroxidative oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol (see picture). The heterogenized system allows easy recovery and reuse of the catalyst, at least for five consecutive cycles, maintaining 96 % of the initial activity and concomitant rather high selectivity.

    33. Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis Over Skeletal Fe[BOND]Ce Catalysts Leached from Rapidly Quenched Ternary Fe[BOND]Ce[BOND]Al Alloys (pages 3857–3865)

      Bo Sun, Dr. Jun Lin, Ke Xu, Dr. Yan Pei, Dr. Shirun Yan, Prof. Dr. Minghua Qiao, Prof. Dr. Xiaoxin Zhang and Prof. Dr. Baoning Zong

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300430

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      CeIII works: The promotion of rapidly quenched skeletal Fe with Ce significantly increases the selectivity to C5+ hydrocarbons in the Fischer–Tropsch synthesis reaction, which is correlated with the surface concentration of Hägg carbide and interpreted as a consequence of the chemical promotion effect of Ce imparted by CeIII. RQ=Rapidly quenched.

    34. Gold Catalysis Opens Up a New Route for the Synthesis of Benzimidazoylquinoxaline Derivatives from Biomass-Derived Products (Glycerol) (pages 3866–3874)

      Prof. Dr. María J. Climent, Prof. Dr. Avelino Corma, Prof. Dr. Sara Iborra and Sergio Martínez-Silvestre

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300416

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      A smooth route: Benzimidazoylquinoxaline derivatives can be obtained in good yields through one-pot oxidative coupling of glycerol or glyceraldehydes with 1,2-phenylenediamines in a two-step reaction, using Au/CeO2 as the catalyst, base-free conditions, mild temperature, and air as the oxidant.

    35. Escherichia coli/ADH-A: An All-Inclusive Catalyst for the Selective Biooxidation and Deracemisation of Secondary Alcohols (pages 3875–3881)

      Dr. Caroline E. Paul, Dr. Iván Lavandera, Dr. Vicente Gotor-Fernández, Prof. Wolfgang Kroutil and Prof. Vicente Gotor

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300409

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      An integrated recycling system: A nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide regeneration system present in Escherichia coli cells is exploited for the oxidation of secondary alcohols with E. coli/alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-A). Racemic alcohols are oxidized selectively without need for an external cofactor or cosubstrate, which affords the remaining enantioenriched (R)-alcohols. Deracemization, desymmetrization, and stereoinversion processes are developed, which leads to optically pure high value-added compounds.

    36. Copper(II) Triflate Catalyzed Allylic Arylation of Allylic Alcohols: Direct and Selective Access to C-Allylanilines (pages 3882–3888)

      Dr. Ke Chen, Houguang Jeremy Chen, Jonathan Wong, Dr. Jinglei Yang and Dr. Sumod A. Pullarkat

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300408

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      All(yl) is good: The direct and selective synthesis of C-allylanilines through Cu(OTf)2-catalyzed (OTf=trifluoromethanesulfonyl) allylic amination involving allylic alcohols and anilines is reported. The reaction can be performed under mild conditions and shows wide functional group tolerance and regioselectivity; the products are obtained in good to high yields. Detailed mechanistic investigations are also discussed.

    37. One-Step Room-Temperature Synthesis of [Al]MCM-41 Materials for the Catalytic Conversion of Phenylglyoxal to Ethylmandelate (pages 3889–3896)

      Zichun Wang, Dr. Yijiao Jiang, Dr. Rafal Rachwalik, Dr. Zhongwen Liu, Dr. Jeffrey Shi, Prof. Dr. Michael Hunger and Dr. Jun Huang

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300375

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      Mesopores flex their catalytic muscles: Mesoporous [Al]MCM-41 materials with nSi/nAl ratios of 15 to 50 suitable for the direct catalytic conversion of phenylglyoxal to ethylmandelate were successfully synthesized at room temperature within 1 h.

    38. Carbon Dioxide Reduction Catalyzed by Dinuclear Ruthenium Polypyridyl Complexes (pages 3897–3903)

      Takashi Ono, Dr. Nora Planas, Dr. Pere Miró, Dr. Mehmed Z. Ertem, Eduardo C. Escudero-Adán, Dr. Jordi Benet-Buchholz, Prof. Dr. Laura Gagliardi, Prof. Dr. Christopher J. Cramer and Prof. Dr. Antoni Llobet

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300372

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      Carbon footprints: New dinuclear ruthenium complexes that act as efficient catalysts for the hydrogenative reduction of carbon dioxide to formic acid have been prepared and fully characterized. The kinetics associated with the catalytic cycle were studied experimentally and a full catalytic cycle was determined on the basis of DFT calculations, which complement the experimental results.

    39. The Key Points of Highly Stable Catalysts for Methane Reforming with Carbon Dioxide (pages 3904–3909)

      Hong Liu, Chengyue Guan, Xuan Li, Liyuan Cheng, Jianbo Zhao, Dr. Nianhua Xue and Prof. Weiping Ding

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300227

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      A reformed character: Efficient catalysts based on CuNi alloy nanoparticles for methane reforming with carbon dioxide to produce syngas have been produced. Modification of the catalyst by coating with zirconia was applied before and after supporting the CuNi alloy. The catalyst shows excellent coking and particle sintering resistance, is highly stable, and completely inhibits the growth of carbon nanotubes.

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