ChemCatChem

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 3

March 2014

Volume 6, Issue 3

Pages 665–894

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Concept
    8. Minireviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Single-Particle Spectroscopy of Alcohol-to-Olefins over SAPO-34 at Different Reaction Stages: Crystal Accessibility and Hydrocarbons Reactivity (ChemCatChem 3/2014) (page 665)

      Qingyun Qian, Dr. Javier Ruiz-Martínez, Prof. Mohamed Mokhtar, Prof. Abdullah M. Asiri, Prof. Shaeel A. Al-Thabaiti, Prof. Suliman N. Basahel and Prof. Dr. Bert M. Weckhuysen

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201490014

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      Combine and shine The cover picture shows the concept of synchrotron-based IR and UV/Vis microspectroscopy techniques monitoring the methanol-to-olefins reaction on a single SAPO-34 crystal and the spatially resolved information obtained on the retained hydrocarbon species and crystal accessibility, as projected on the two screens. In their Full Paper on p. 772 ff., Q. Qian, J. Ruiz-Martínez, B. M. Weckhuysen et al. applied in situ synchrotron-based IR and UV/Vis microscopy in combination with isotopic switching experiments to identify the different hydrocarbon species formed and to assess the reactivity and accessibility of individual SAPO-34 crystals. Major differences have been observed between the methanol-to-olefins and ethanol-to-olefins processes in terms of the number of reaction stages and the formation and activity of distinct hydrocarbon species, such as alkylated mono- and polyaromatics.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Effect of the Nature of the CeO2 Support of the Rh Catalyst on Triggering the Oxidative Reforming of n-Butane for H2 Production from Ambient Temperature (ChemCatChem 3/2014) (page 666)

      Dr. Katsutoshi Sato, Kouhei Adachi, Prof. Dr. Yusaku Takita and Dr. Katsutoshi Nagaoka

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201490015

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      For the next generation of fuel-cell applications The cover picture shows a scheme of hydrogen production from ambient temperature via oxidative reforming (OR) of n-butane over an Rh/CeO2 catalyst, which enables the development of a self-sufficient reforming system. In their Full Paper on p. 784 ff., K. Sato, K. Nagaoka et al. describe that a critical parameter of the catalyst for triggering the OR from ambient temperature is the number of easily reducible-surface CeO2 and exposed Rh sites. Increase in these values contribute to increasing catalyst bed temperature and lowering catalytic auto-ignition temperature, respectively, which results in decreasing the temperature for H2 reduction required prior to triggering the OR from ambient temperature.

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      Inside Back Cover: Size and Shape-controlled Pd Nanocrystals on ZnO and SiO2: When the Nature of the Support Determines the Active Phase (ChemCatChem 3/2014) (page 895)

      Dr. Micaela Crespo-Quesada, Dr. Songhak Yoon, Prof. Mingshang Jin, Prof. Younan Xia, Prof. Anke Weidenkaff and Prof. Lioubov Kiwi-Minsker

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201490019

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      Combined effects for improved catalysis! The cover picture shows the evolution of the active phase of shape-controlled palladium nanocrystals (NCs) during acetylene hydrogenation, depending on the nature of the support. In their Communication on p. 767 ff., M. Crespo-Quesada, S. Yoon et al. show that the structure sensitivity of a chemical reaction is a complex phenomenon that originates from the reconstruction of the Pd-NCs in response to the reactive environment. This reconstruction is sensitive to the support used. Indeed, acetylene hydrogenation is a structure-sensitive reaction [Pd(111) in octahedra is more active than Pd(100) in cubes]. However, the catalytically active and selective palladium carbide (PdCx) phase was readily formed in Pd-NCs on the SiO2 (much faster on Pd cubes than on Pd octahedra), whereas a markedly less active PdZn phase was formed on the ZnO-supported Pd NCs.

  2. Cover Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Concept
    8. Minireviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Single-Particle Spectroscopy of Alcohol-to-Olefins over SAPO-34 at Different Reaction Stages: Crystal Accessibility and Hydrocarbons Reactivity (page 667)

      Qingyun Qian, Dr. Javier Ruiz-Martínez, Prof. Mohamed Mokhtar, Prof. Abdullah M. Asiri, Prof. Shaeel A. Al-Thabaiti, Prof. Suliman N. Basahel and Prof. Dr. Bert M. Weckhuysen

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400102

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      “We consider the isotopic switching experiments combined with IR microspectroscopy the most novel aspects of this research.” This and more about the story behind the research featured on the front cover can be found in this issue's Cover Profile. Read the full text of the corresponding research on http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cctc.201300962.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
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    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
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    8. Minireviews
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    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemCatChem 3/2014 (pages 668–678)

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201490016

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
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    8. Minireviews
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    11. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: ChemCatChem 3/2014 (page 669)

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201490017

  5. News

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    5. Masthead
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    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemCatChem 3/2014 (pages 680–683)

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201490018

  6. Concept

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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
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    8. Minireviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. How Important are Impurities in Catalysis? An Example from Ring-Closing Metathesis (pages 684–688)

      Christa Lübbe, Dr. Andreas Dumrath, Dr. Helfried Neumann, Marion Schäffer, Prof. Dr. Ralf Zimmermann, Prof. Dr. Matthias Beller and Dr. Renat Kadyrov

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300779

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      Pure or not pure, that is the question: The presence of small amounts of impurities has a dramatic influence on the reactivity and selectivity of a novel ruthenium-based ring-closing metathesis (RCM) catalyst.

  7. Minireviews

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    1. Enzymatic Decarboxylation—An Emerging Reaction for Chemicals Production from Renewable Resources (pages 689–701)

      Prof. Dr. Robert Kourist, Dr. Jan-Karl Guterl, Prof. Dr. Kenji Miyamoto and Prof. Dr. Volker Sieber

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300881

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      Defunct(ionalizing) organics: Enzymatic decarboxylation is an emerging tool for the defunctionalization of organic molecules. Recent applications span from the synthesis of high-value fine chemicals to the preparation of bio-based commodities.

    2. The Partial Hydrogenation of 1,3-Dienes Catalysed by Soluble Transition-Metal Nanoparticles (pages 702–710)

      Leandro Luza, Dr. Aitor Gual and Prof. Dr. Jairton Dupont

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300673

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      Soluble selectivity: Soluble transition-metal nanoparticles have emerged as efficient alternatives for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-dienes to monoalkenes. These soluble materials possess both heterotopic-like and homotopic-like characteristics that allow for the design of more effective catalysts for the partial hydrogenation of dienes.

  8. Highlight

    1. Top of page
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    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
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    8. Minireviews
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    11. Full Papers
    1. 2-Alkenyl Furans from a Palladium-Catalyzed Cyclization and Coupling of Ene-Yne-Ketones (pages 711–712)

      Craig D. Smith and Dr. David J. France

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301050

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      Furious furans: A recent article by Wang et al. reports a novel palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction to form 2-alkenyl substituted furans from ene-yne-ketones. The electrophiles used in this study were benzyl, aryl and allyl bromides to yield highly substituted furans in moderate to good yields. A palladium (2-furyl)carbene is proposed as a key reactive intermediate, which is supported by DFT calculations.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Concept
    8. Minireviews
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    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Improved Selectivity toward Light Olefins in the Reaction of Toluene with Methanol Over the Modified HZSM-5 Catalyst (pages 713–718)

      Dr. Yi Bi, Yingli Wang, Prof. Dr. Yingxu Wei, Yanli He, Zhengxi Yu, Prof. Dr. Zhongmin Liu and Prof. Dr. Lei Xu

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301072

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      Time is shortening: Light olefins and para-xylene are produced with high selectivity in the reaction of toluene with methanol over a modified HZSM-5 catalyst. The presence of toluene and as-produced xylene shortens the reaction induction period and reduces the formation temperature of ethylene and propylene, which is beneficial to improve the selectivity toward light olefins, particularly ethylene.

    2. Aerobic Oxidation of Phenols and Related Compounds using Carbon Nanotube–Gold Nanohybrid Catalysts (pages 719–723)

      Dr. Dhanaji V. Jawale, Dr. Edmond Gravel, Dr. Valérie Geertsen, Dr. Haiyan Li, Dr. Nimesh Shah, Prof. Dr. Irishi N. N. Namboothiri and Dr. Eric Doris

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301069

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      Coming up for air: Gold nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes were investigated as efficient catalysts in the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenol-type compounds.

    3. A Homogeneous Metal Oxide Catalyst Enhanced Solid–Solid Reaction in the Hydrogen Desorption of a Lithium–Hydrogen–Nitrogen System (pages 724–727)

      Tengfei Zhang, Dr. Shigehito Isobe, Dr. Yongming Wang, Prof. Naoyuki Hashimoto and Prof. Somei Ohnuki

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301068

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      Homogeneous solids for H2 storage: A solid–solid reaction is enhanced by a homogeneous metal oxide in the dehydrogenation of a lithium–hydrogen–nitrogen system, which results in very good hydrogen storage capacity and a low desorption temperature. The catalytic effect of LiTi2O4 probably results from an increase in the mobility of Li+ ions between the LiH and LiNH2 solid phases.

    4. Graphene Oxide Catalyzed Dehydration of Fructose into 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural with Isopropanol as Cosolvent (pages 728–732)

      Dr. Hongliang Wang, Qingqiang Kong, Dr. Yingxiong Wang, Dr. Tiansheng Deng, Dr. Chengmeng Chen, Prof. Xianglin Hou and Prof. Yulei Zhu

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301067

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      GO-ing all the way: Graphene oxide is demonstrated to be a green heterogeneous catalyst for the selective dehydration of fructose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in a cost efficient and environmentally benign isopropanol-mediated solvent system. A small number of sulfonic groups with the synergic effect of oxygen-containing groups (alcohols, epoxides, carboxylates) make graphene oxide an efficient acid catalyst.

    5. Di-tert-butyl Peroxide Promoted Direct C[BOND]H Arylation of Unactivated Arenes with Aryl Halides (pages 733–735)

      Yi-Wei Zhu, Prof. Wen-Bin Yi, Jin-Long Qian and Prof. Chun Cai

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301058

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      Radical reasoning: Di-tert-butyl peroxide and potassium tert-butoxide smoothly direct the C[BOND]H arylation of unactivated benzene derivatives with aryl halides without the aid of a transition metal. Reactions occur through a base-promoted homolytic aromatic substitution process and involve aryl radicals and aryl radical anions as intermediates. The process to synthesize biaryl compounds is high yielding and practical.

    6. An Artificial Imine Reductase based on the Ribonuclease S Scaffold (pages 736–740)

      Maika Genz, Dr. Valentin Köhler, Michel Krauss, Dr. David Singer, Prof. Ralf Hoffmann, Prof. Thomas R. Ward and Prof. Norbert Sträter

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300995

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      It's a fake! Dative anchoring of a piano-stool complex within ribonuclease S results in an artificial imine reductase. The catalytic performance can be modulated by varying the coordinating amino acid residues in the S-peptide. Binding of Cp*Ir (Cp*=C5Me5) to the native active site results in good conversions and moderate enantiomeric excess values for the synthesis of salsolidine.

    7. Reduced Vanadium and Molybdenum Oxides Catalyze the Equivalent Formation of Ethane and Acetaldehyde from Ethanol (pages 741–744)

      Yoichi Nakamura, Prof. Dr. Toru Murayama and Prof. Dr. Wataru Ueda

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300991

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      Good things come in twos: The co-formation of ethane and acetaldehyde from ethanol occurs over reduced vanadium and molybdenum oxide catalysts. The mechanism for this reaction is proposed to be a hydrogen transfer reaction between two ethanol molecules adsorbed on the metal cation–oxygen anion pair sites of reduced vanadium and molybdenum oxides.

    8. Palladium on Ionic Liquid Derived Nanofibrillated Mesoporous Carbon: A Recyclable Catalyst for the Ullmann Homocoupling Reactions of Aryl Halides in Water (pages 745–748)

      Prof. Dr. Babak Karimi, Dr. Hesam Behzadnia and Prof. Hojatollah Vali

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300893

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      Giving Ullmann fibrillations: Palladium nanoparticles supported on an ionic-liquid-derived nanofibrillated mesoporous carbon are highly active in catalyzing the Ullmann homocoupling of a range of aryl chlorides, bromides, iodides, and heteroaryl bromides in aqueous medium without the need for chemical co-reducing agents. The catalysts are recovered and reused several times without significant loss of activity.

    9. OMS-2 for Aerobic, Catalytic, One-pot Alcohol Oxidation-Wittig Reactions: Efficient Access to α,β-Unsaturated Esters (pages 749–752)

      Jagadeswara R. Kona, Dr. Cecil K. King'ondu, Prof. Amy R. Howell and Prof. Steven L. Suib

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300942

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      Filter and use again! Porous manganese oxide molecular sieve based catalysts were found to efficiently promote the oxidation of a variety of alcohols to the aldehydes, which reacted in situ with stabilized Wittig reagent, providing almost exclusively E-α,β-unsaturated esters in good to excellent yields. The heterogeneous catalyst used was made from inexpensive starting materials, and the recovered catalyst was found to be reusable with a modest loss in activity.

    10. Catalytic Conversion of Cellulose into Levulinic Acid by a Sulfonated Chloromethyl Polystyrene Solid Acid Catalyst (pages 753–757)

      Yong Zuo, Prof. Ying Zhang and Prof. Dr. Yao Fu

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300956

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      Resin-ating results: The chloromethyl polystyrene resin based solid acid CP-SO3H-1.69 with a high amount of catalytic sites ([BOND]SO3H) was designed and synthesized. Levulinic acid was obtained in 33 % yield by hydrolyzing microcrystalline cellulose over CP-SO3H-1.69 in water. Levulinic acid was achieved in a high yield of 65 % with 90 wt % γ-valerolactone/10 wt % water as the reaction medium.

    11. Fe3O4@SiO2–TEMPO as a Magnetically Recyclable Catalyst for Highly Selective Aerobic Oxidation of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural into 2,5-Diformylfuran under Metal- and Halogen-Free Conditions (pages 758–762)

      Prof. Dr. Babak Karimi, Hamid M. Mirzaei and Elham Farhangi

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301081

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      A simple pull-out: Highly selective aerobic oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) into 2,5-diformylfuran (DFF) is achieved by using a magnetically separable 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxide (TEMPO) catalyst (Fe3O4@SiO2–TEMPO) with tert-butyl nitrite (TBN) as cocatalyst under metal- and halogen-free conditions.

    12. [(NHC)Fe(CO)4] Efficient Pre-catalyst for Selective Hydroboration of Alkenes (pages 763–766)

      Jianxia Zheng, Dr. Jean-Baptiste Sortais and Prof. Dr. Christophe Darcel

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301062

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      If you tolerate this then your catalyst will be next: [(IMes)Fe(CO)4] complex was found to be an efficient pre-catalyst for the hydroboration of functional alkenes in the presence of pinacolborane at room temperature. Notably, UV irradiation is important to promote this catalytic transformation. Interestingly, high chemo- and regioselectivities were observed as only anti-Markovnikov boronate derivatives were obtained and various functional groups can be tolerated.

    13. Size and Shape-controlled Pd Nanocrystals on ZnO and SiO2: When the Nature of the Support Determines the Active Phase (pages 767–771)

      Dr. Micaela Crespo-Quesada, Dr. Songhak Yoon, Prof. Mingshang Jin, Prof. Younan Xia, Prof. Anke Weidenkaff and Prof. Lioubov Kiwi-Minsker

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301043

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      Pd-nanocrystals & support interaction: The structure sensitivity of Pd-catalyzed acetylene hydrogenation is the consequence of the profound rearrangements occurring within Pd nanocrystals (NCs) in response to the reactive environment and is controlled by the support. Active PdCx was formed on SiO2, whereas Pd NCs supported on ZnO preferentially formed PdZn, rendering a less active and unstable catalyst.

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Concept
    8. Minireviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Single-Particle Spectroscopy of Alcohol-to-Olefins over SAPO-34 at Different Reaction Stages: Crystal Accessibility and Hydrocarbons Reactivity (pages 772–783)

      Qingyun Qian, Dr. Javier Ruiz-Martínez, Prof. Mohamed Mokhtar, Prof. Abdullah M. Asiri, Prof. Shaeel A. Al-Thabaiti, Prof. Suliman N. Basahel and Prof. Dr. Bert M. Weckhuysen

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300962

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      All the single crystals: Alcohol conversions conducted over single SAPO-34 crystals are studied by a combination of in situ synchrotron-based IR and UV/Vis micro-spectroscopy. With H/D exchange experiments, it is possible to determine the nature and activity of the hydrocarbons and the spatial distribution and accessibility of the Brønsted acid sites through different reaction stages.

    2. Effect of the Nature of the CeO2 Support of the Rh Catalyst on Triggering the Oxidative Reforming of n-Butane for H2 Production from Ambient Temperature (pages 784–789)

      Dr. Katsutoshi Sato, Kouhei Adachi, Prof. Dr. Yusaku Takita and Dr. Katsutoshi Nagaoka

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300826

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      Pull the trigger: A Rh/CeO2 catalyst with a high specific surface area triggers the oxidative reforming (OR) of n-butane from ambient temperature after H2 reduction at low temperature (773 K). The oxidation of high-surface area CeO2−x species generates heat and well-dispersed Rh contributes to the reaction initiation at low temperature.

    3. Fe2O3@LaxSr1−xFeO3 Core–Shell Redox Catalyst for Methane Partial Oxidation (pages 790–799)

      Arya Shafiefarhood, Nathan Galinsky, Assoc. Prof. Yan Huang, Prof. Yanguang Chen and Assist. Prof. Fanxing Li

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301104

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      Loop-the-loop: A FeOx@LaxSr1−xFeO3−δ core–shell redox catalyst was designed and synthesized. The redox catalyst, capable of converting methane into syngas in the absence of gaseous oxidants, was found to be active, selective, and carbon formation resistant under cyclic redox conditions at elevated temperature.

    4. A Mechanistic Study of Ni-catalyzed Carbon Dioxide Coupling with Ethylene towards the Manufacture of Acrylic Acid (pages 800–807)

      Dr. Gang Yang, Dr. Benjamin Schäffner, Dr. Matthias Blug, Prof. Dr. Emiel J. M. Hensen and Dr. Evgeny A. Pidko

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301051

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      Fortune favors the bold! Density functional theory calculations predict that the unfavorable energetics of the Ni-catalyzed catalytic coupling of ethylene with CO2 to acrylic acid cannot be alleviated by varying steric and electronic properties of bidentate phosphorous-based ligands. The catalytic process can be realized in the presence of a sufficiently strong base co-reactant.

    5. Reusable Supported Ruthenium Catalysts for the Alkylation of Amines by using Primary Alcohols (pages 808–814)

      Siah Pei Shan, Dr. Tuan Thanh Dang, Dr. Abdul Majeed Seayad and Dr. Balamurugan Ramalingam

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300971

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      Support group steals the show: An efficient Ru-based heterogeneous catalyst from readily available supported phosphine ligands is developed. The nature of the linkage and the extent of ruthenium incorporation are crucial in determining the catalytic activity. The catalyst can be recycled and used under continuous flow in a packed-bed reactor. The alkylation of cyclic amines is achieved in excellent yield at moderate temperatures in the absence of any external base.

    6. Superparamagnetic Copper Ferrite Nanoparticles as an Efficient Heterogeneous Catalyst for the α-Arylation of 1,3-Diketones with C[BOND]C Cleavage (pages 815–823)

      Anh T. Nguyen, Lan T. M. Nguyen, Chung K. Nguyen, Dr. Thanh Truong and Dr. Nam T. S. Phan

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300708

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      Magnetic attraction: Superparamagnetic CuFe2O4 nanoparticles are synthesized from CuCl2 and FeCl3 by a co-precipitation method. The CuFe2O4 nanoparticles are used as a solid catalyst for the α-arylation reaction of acetylacetone with iodobenzene to form phenylacetone as the principal product and 3-phenyl-2,4-pentanedione as the byproduct.

    7. Nickel–Gallium Intermetallic Nanocrystal Catalysts in the Semihydrogenation of Phenylacetylene (pages 824–831)

      Dr. Changming Li, Yudi Chen, Dr. Shitong Zhang, Junyao Zhou, Dr. Fei Wang, Dr. Shan He, Prof. Min Wei, Prof. David G. Evans and Prof. Xue Duan

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300813

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      The effect of isolation: Well-dispersed Ni–Ga intermetallic compounds with tunable particle size demonstrate excellent catalytic behavior in the selective hydrogenation of phenylacetylene to styrene. X-ray absorption fine-structure characterization and DFT calculations reveal the electron transfer and active-site isolation effect in the Ni–Ga intermetallic compounds (IMCs), accounting for the enhanced hydrogenation selectivity.

    8. Creation of Brønsted Acidity by Grafting Aluminum Isopropoxide on Silica under Controlled Conditions: Determination of the Number of Brønsted Sites and their Turnover Frequency for m-Xylene Isomerization (pages 832–841)

      Dr. Maxime Caillot, Dr. Alexandra Chaumonnot, Dr. Mathieu Digne and Prof. Dr. Jeroen A. Van Bokhoven

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300824

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      Ethanol as the acid test: The thermodesorption of ethanol demonstrates the formation of Brønsted acid sites on aluminum-grafted silica. Knowing the number of sites, the turnover frequency (TOF) for m-xylene isomerization is calculated. Brønsted sites of Al/SiO2 are weaker than those of Si/Al2O3 and ultrastable Y-type (USY) zeolites, which is reflected in the ethanol dehydration temperature.

    9. Effect of TiO2 Surface Structure on the Hydrogen Production Activity of the Pt@CuO/TiO2 Photocatalysts for Water Splitting (pages 842–847)

      Fei Teng, Mindong Chen, Na Li, Xia Hua, Kai Wang and Tongguang Xu

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300874

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      What a junction! CuO/TiO2 composites are prepared by using TiO2 nanosheets and nanorods as the precursors. Owing to a higher surface energy of the {0 0 1} facets, the TiO2 nanosheet-based Pt@CuO/TiO2 photocatalyst may form a more stable p–n heterojunction and thus displays a higher hydrogen production activity upon UV light irradiation and a higher recyclability than the TiO2 nanorod-based one.

    10. The Role of Ru and RuO2 in the Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural for the Production of 2,5-Dimethylfuran (pages 848–856)

      Dr. Jungho Jae, Dr. Weiqing Zheng, Dr. Ayman M. Karim, Dr. Wei Guo, Prof. Raul F. Lobo and Prof. Dionisios G. Vlachos

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300945

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      Double trouble: A selective hydrodeoxygenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural to 2,5-dimethylfuran is achieved with a partially oxidized Ru/C as a catalyst and 2-propanol as a hydrogen donor. The oxidized Ru/C catalyst demonstrates bifunctional behavior, in which Ru catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 2-propanol and the hydrogenation–hydrogenolysis of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and RuO2 promotes dimethylfuran production via hydrogenolysis.

    11. Solvent- and Ligand-free Diboration of Alkynes and Alkenes Catalyzed by Platinum Nanoparticles on Titania (pages 857–865)

      Dr. Francisco Alonso, Dr. Yanina Moglie, Laura Pastor-Pérez and Prof. Antonio Sepúlveda-Escribano

      Article first published online: 6 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300946

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      Click diboration: The diboration of alkynes and alkenes catalyzed by platinum nanoparticles on titania is shown to take place under solvent- and ligand-free conditions in air. The 1,2-diboronvinyl compounds are obtained with exclusive cis stereochemistry and are subjected to different useful chemical transformations.

    12. Nanorods with Biocatalytically Induced Self-Electrophoresis (pages 866–872)

      Ileana-Alexandra Pavel, Ada-Ioana Bunea, Dr. Sorin David and Dr. Szilveszter Gáspár

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301016

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      Waving the enzymatic wand: Biocatalytically induced self-electrophoresis enhances the diffusive motion of polypyrrole (PPy)–gold nanorods modified by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and cytochrome c (Cyt c) if they are suspended in solutions that contain superoxide and hydrogen peroxide.

    13. Highly Efficient Asymmetric Simmons–Smith Cyclopropanation Promoted by Chiral Heteroorganic Aziridinyl Ligands (pages 873–875)

      Dr. Michał Rachwalski, Sylwia Kaczmarczyk, Prof. Stanisław Leśniak and Prof. Piotr Kiełbasiński

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300883

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      Combination at its best: Enantiomerically pure heteroorganic ligands, bearing a hydroxy moiety, a stereogenic sulfinyl group, and an enantiomeric aziridine moiety, have proved highly efficient in the asymmetric Simmons–Smith cyclopropanation of allylic alcohols, which generates the desired products in high yields (up to 95 %) and with ee values up to 94 %.

    14. High Catalytic Performance of MoO3-Bi2SiO5/SiO2 for the Gas-Phase Epoxidation of Propylene by Molecular Oxygen (pages 876–884)

      Yijun Pang, Prof. Xiaohui Chen, Dr. Chengzhi Xu, Yangjun Lei and Prof. Kemei Wei

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300811

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      A new sensation in epoxidation: We describe the probable synergistic effects of MoO3 and Bi2SiO5 in propylene epoxidation. The reactive centers consist of nanoparticulate species of crystalline MoO3 to activate the propylene and bismuth oxide cluster cations to activate O2.

    15. Nickel Boosts Ring-Opening Activity of Iridium (pages 885–894)

      Hessam Ziaei-Azad and Prof. Natalia Semagina

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300844

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      Save the rare: To avoid inefficient use of rare and expensive catalytic metals, iridium atoms are placed only in the outermost layer of the nanoparticles, with inexpensive metal (nickel) inside, which boosts the catalytic performance.

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