ChemCatChem

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 6

June 2014

Volume 6, Issue 6

Pages 1483–1800

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Conference Report
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Highly Efficient Reversible Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Formates Using a Ruthenium PNP-Pincer Catalyst (ChemCatChem 6/2014) (page 1483)

      Georgy A. Filonenko, Robbert van Putten, Erik N. Schulpen, Prof. Dr. Emiel J. M. Hensen and Dr. Evgeny A. Pidko

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201490034

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      Milder, faster, stronger, better! The cover shows a conceptual hydrogen battery in which H2 storage and its release are achieved through reversible catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 with an Ru-PNP pincer complex. In their Communication on p. 1526 ff., E. A. Pidko et al. describe a homogeneous catalytic system that shows unprecedented activity in both CO2 hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of HCO2H. The authors describe a key role of the base promoter on the reaction mechanism, the overall performance of the system, and its H2 storage capacity.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Palladium(II)/Polyoxometalate-Catalyzed Direct Alkenylation of Benzofurans under Atmospheric Dioxygen (ChemCatChem 6/2014) (page 1484)

      Prof. Dr. Qiufeng Huang, Shaojia Ke, Lin Qiu, Xiaofeng Zhang and Prof. Dr. Shen Lin

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201490035

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      Shake your POM POMs! The cover picture shows that palladium acetate combined with 11-molybdovanadophosphoric acid can promote C[BOND]H olefination of benzofurans under an atmosphere of dioxygen. In their Communication on p. 1531 ff., Q. Huang et al. present that a polyoxometalate (POM) can act as a relay species in the direct C[BOND]H alkenylation of benzofurans, in which dioxygen serves as the terminal oxidant. Functional groups such as ethoxy, cyano, chloro, bromo, and ester are tolerated under the reaction conditions and N-acetylglycine appears to be an effective additive for this reaction; a sporting contribution! On that note, we wish all football teams and supporters of the FIFA World Cup Brazil a great tournament!

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      Inside Back Cover: Tuning Al2O3 Surface with SnO2 to Prepare Improved Supports for Pd for CO Oxidation (ChemCatChem 6/2014) (page 1801)

      Prof. Dr. Xiang Wang, Jin Shu Tian, Yu Hua Zheng, Dr. Xiang Lan Xu, Prof. Dr. Wen Ming Liu and Xiu Zhong Fang

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201490039

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      SnO2 boosts! The cover picture shows how SnO2 is used to tune an Al2O3 surface to synthesize significantly improved supports for Pd for CO oxidation. In their Full Paper on p. 1604 ff., X. Wang et al. demonstrate that the addition of SnO2 maintains high surface areas and introduces active O species into the prepared SnO2/Al2O3 composite supports, thus improving Pd dispersion and strengthening its interaction with the supports. Consequently, the activity and stability of Pd/SnO2/Al2O3 are significantly improved. Intriguingly, the presence of H2O vapor further increases the catalytic activity.

  2. Cover Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Conference Report
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Highly Efficient Reversible Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Formates Using a Ruthenium PNP-Pincer Catalyst (page 1485)

      Georgy A. Filonenko, Robbert van Putten, Erik N. Schulpen, Prof. Dr. Emiel J. M. Hensen and Dr. Evgeny A. Pidko

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402265

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      “It came as a surprise that varying the base strength also caused a change in the rate-determining step…” This and more about the story behind the research featured on the front cover can be found in this issue's Cover Profile. Read the full text of the corresponding research at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cctc.201402119.

  3. Graphical Abstract

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    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Conference Report
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
  4. Masthead

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  5. News

    1. Top of page
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    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
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  6. Minireview

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    1. Reactions of Terpenes Catalyzed by Heteropoly Compounds: Valorization of Biorenewables (pages 1506–1515)

      Prof. Elena V. Gusevskaya

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400052

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      More bang for your buck! Terpenes, natural products available from essential oils, are an important biomass-based feedstock for the pharmaceutical, flavor, and fragrance industries. This article discusses the use of heteropoly compounds (HPCs) as efficient and environmentally benign acid catalysts in terpene chemistry.

  7. Highlights

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    4. Graphical Abstract
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    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Expanding the Synthetic Portfolio of Organolithiums: Direct Use in Catalytic Cross-Coupling Reactions (pages 1516–1519)

      Dr. Vittorio Pace and Prof. Dr. Renzo Luisi

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402014

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      Revitalising organolithiums: Important advancements in the field of palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions have been gained recently through the direct use of notoriously difficult organolithium reagents as coupling partners. Such tactics can improve synthetic procedures for carbon–carbon bond formation under mild conditions.

    2. Iron-Catalysed Reductive Cross-Coupling of Alkenes (pages 1520–1522)

      Mark D. Greenhalgh and Dr. Stephen P. Thomas

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402076

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      Radical stuff: Iron-catalyzed alkene hydrofunctionalization has been reported by a number of groups using the reaction of unactivated alkenes with sodium borohydride or phenylsilane to give alkyl radical intermediates. Reaction with a range of radical traps has been applied to the formation of carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bonds and used recently for reductive cross-coupling of alkenes. EWG=Electron-withdrawing group.

  8. Conference Report

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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
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    10. Communications
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    1. German Catalysis on an International Scale in Weimar (pages 1523–1525)

      Juliane Titus, Dr. Stefan Kaluza and Dr. Roland Marschall

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402266

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      These cats know where it's at: The 47th annual meeting of the German Catalysis Society (GeCatS), hosted by DECHEMA, provided a forum for a superb span of catalysis research, covering renewable resources and sustainability, breakthroughs in heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis as well as state-of-the-art in biocatalysis, photocatalysis, and much more. Members of YounGeCatS recount the happenings of this year's meeting in Weimar.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
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    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Highly Efficient Reversible Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Formates Using a Ruthenium PNP-Pincer Catalyst (pages 1526–1530)

      Georgy A. Filonenko, Robbert van Putten, Erik N. Schulpen, Prof. Dr. Emiel J. M. Hensen and Dr. Evgeny A. Pidko

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402119

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      Like pinning down an ant: An Ru PNP catalyst provides unprecedented rates of CO2 hydrogenation up to 1 100 000 h−1 (turnover number >200 000) and excellent activity in the dehydrogenation of formic acid in DMF if used with the non-nucleophilic 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene base. Unlike amine-based systems, this medium allows us to achieve high formate capacity together with rapid H2 charging and release.

    2. Palladium(II)/Polyoxometalate-Catalyzed Direct Alkenylation of Benzofurans under Atmospheric Dioxygen (pages 1531–1534)

      Prof. Dr. Qiufeng Huang, Shaojia Ke, Lin Qiu, Xiaofeng Zhang and Prof. Dr. Shen Lin

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400091

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      A tolerant POM: The efficient and selective direct alkenylation of benzofurans is achieved by using palladium acetate combined with 11-molybdovanadophosphoric acid. The transformation is performed under an atmosphere of dioxygen. Functional groups such as ethoxy, cyano, chloro, bromo, and ester are tolerated under the reaction conditions, and N-acetylglycine (Ac-Gly-OH) appears to be an effective additive for this reaction. 1 atm=101.3 kPa.

    3. Whole-Cell Biocatalysis in Deep-Eutectic-Solvents/Aqueous Mixtures (pages 1535–1537)

      Zaira Maugeri and Dr. Pablo Domínguez de María

      Version of Record online: 24 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400077

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      DESpicably good: Whole-cell biocatalysis with the use of baker's yeast is demonstrated in different mixtures of water with deep eutectic solvents (DESs). Enantioselective ketone reduction is observed for long reaction times (>200 h), which suggests that the whole cells remain stable in these neoteric solvents. By changing the proportion of the DES added, a complete inversion of enantioselectivity is observed.

    4. Facile Synthesis of 3 D Platinum Dendrites with a Clean Surface as Highly Stable Electrocatalysts (pages 1538–1542)

      Tian Wu, Hui Ming Zhou, Dr. Bao Yu Xia, Peng Xiao, Ya Yan, Ming Shi Xie and Prof. Dr. Xin Wang

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400058

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      Clean and stable: 3 D Pt nanodendrites with a clean surface were prepared by a facile inorganic-species-assisted strategy. Owing to their unique 3 D morphology composed of interconnected 1 D Pt nanorods, the clean unsupported 3 D Pt nanodendrites exhibit higher stability and activity than commercial carbon black supported Pt nanoparticles and Pt black electrocatalysts.

    5. Synthesis and Peroxidase-Like Activity of Salt-Resistant Platinum Nanoparticles by Using Bovine Serum Albumin as the Scaffold (pages 1543–1548)

      Shao-Bin He, Hao-Hua Deng, Dr. Ai-Lin Liu, Guang-Wen Li, Prof. Xin-Hua Lin, Prof. Wei Chen and Prof. Xing-Hua Xia

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400011

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      Say no to excess salt! Salt-resistant platinum nanoparticles are synthesized in the bovine serum albumin scaffold through biomineralization. The resulting platinum nanoparticles possess excellent peroxidase-like activity that can be used to catalyze the oxidation of various chromogenic, fluorogenic, and chemiluminescent substrates in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The peroxidase-like activity of platinum nanoparticles can be well preserved even in an high ionic strength environment.

    6. A Copper-Catalyzed Variant of the Michaelis–Arbuzov Reaction (pages 1549–1552)

      Jorge Ballester, Jérémie Gatignol, Guntram Schmidt, Dr. Carole Alayrac, Prof. Annie-Claude Gaumont and Dr. Marc Taillefer

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301029

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      Copper load of this! The first copper-catalyzed Michaelis–Arbuzov reactions are described. The methodology is ligand-free and allows the direct synthesis of various aryl phosphonates, aryl phosphinates, and aryl phosphine oxides from aryl iodides.

    7. Study of the Role of Surface Oxygen Functional Groups on Carbon Nanotubes in the Selective Oxidation of Acrolein (pages 1553–1557)

      Bingwei Zhong, Dr. Hongyang Liu, Xianmo Gu and Prof. Dang Sheng Su

      Version of Record online: 14 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400082

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      On the surface of things: A method to adjust the oxygen functional groups on the surfaces of oxidized carbon nanotubes to be used in the selective oxidation of acrolein (ACR) is described. Epoxy and lactone groups are found to be the active sites in the oxidation of acrolein to acrylic acid. Kinetic studies are undertaken to determine the role of the concentration of the oxygen functional groups, and a reaction mechanism for the ACR is proposed.

    8. Model Molecules with Oxygenated Groups Catalyze the Reduction of Nitrobenzene: Insight into Carbocatalysis (pages 1558–1561)

      Shuchang Wu, Dr. Guodong Wen, Dr. Xiumei Liu, Bingwei Zhong and Prof. Dr. Dang Sheng Su

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402070

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      Modeling carbon: Thanks to model molecules, the carbon-catalyzed reduction of nitrobenzene is mimicked. The role of different oxygen functional groups on a carbon catalyst is studied, and the carbonyl and hydroxyl groups seem to be the most important moieties, which may be ascribed to their ability to activate hydrazine. The reaction occurs more likely through a direct route, during which nitrosobenzene may also be converted directly into aniline.

    9. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Hydroaroylation of Styrenes in Water through Directed C[BOND]H Bond Activation (pages 1562–1566)

      Anis Tlili, Johannes Schranck, Jola Pospech, Dr. Helfried Neumann and Prof. Dr. Matthias Beller

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402031

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      Three-Component Hydroaroylation: Hydroaroylation through C[BOND]H activation of (hetero)arenes bearing ortho-directing groups (DGs) proceeds in the presence of a ruthenium catalyst, carbon monoxide, and styrenes. The shown coupling process provides selective and atom-economic access to (hetero)- aromatic ketones.

    10. Tin–Tin Dioxide@Hollow Carbon Nanospheres Synthesized by Aerosol Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition for High-Density Lithium Storage (pages 1567–1569)

      Dr. Jeong Hoon Byeon and Dr. Young-Woo Kim

      Version of Record online: 9 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402013

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      Floating tin: The gas-phase self-assembly of Sn-SnO2@hollow carbon nanospheres through a new floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition methodology is introduced for the first time to enhance the lithium storage performance of carbon nanospheres.

    11. Bifunctional Ag-based catalyst for NOx reduction with E-diesel fuel (pages 1570–1574)

      Dr. Pyung Soon Kim, Prof. Byong K. Cho, Prof. In-Sik Nam and Dr. Jin Woo Choung

      Version of Record online: 23 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402085

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      Cleaner fuels: The Ag/AlF3/Al2O3 was developed and its excellent deNOx activity was demonstrated by the simulated E-diesel/SCR. AlF3 was almost evenly distributed as AlOxFy and AlF3 on Ag/AlF3/Al2O3, which increased Ag+ ions and the acid site density, respectively. These multiple roles of AlF3 are identified as the origin of the synergistic interaction between Ag/Al2O3 and AlF3/Al2O3. SCR=selective catalytic reduction.

    12. Surfactant-Induced Substrate Selectivity in the Palladium-Nanoparticle-Mediated Chemoselective Hydrogenation of Unsaturated Aldehydes in Water (pages 1575–1578)

      Giorgio La Sorella, Dr. Patrizia Canton, Prof. Giorgio Strukul and Dr. Alessandro Scarso

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402034

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      Something in the water: A hundred-fold substrate selectivity is observed in the competitive chemoselective hydrogenation of seven α,β-unsaturated aldehydes (C4–C10) in water with palladium nanoparticles stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfonate as a surfactant. The medium makes the longer lipophilic substrates hundreds of times more reactive than the shorter more hydrophilic ones, whereas in an organic medium almost no difference is observed.

    13. Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3 over a Cu-SSZ-13 Catalyst Prepared by a Solid-State Ion-Exchange Method (pages 1579–1583)

      Di Wang, Dr. Feng Gao, Dr. Charles H. F. Peden, Dr. Junhui Li, Dr. Krishna Kamasamudram and Prof. William S. Epling

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402010

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      A solid-state ion-exchange method was developed to synthesize Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts with excellent performance in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 (NH3-SCR) and with durable hydrothermal stability. Experiments provide evidence that isolated Cu ions were successfully exchanged into the pores, which are the active centers for the NH3-SCR reaction.

    14. Superior Catalytic Activity of Sub-5 μm-Thick Pt/SiC Films as Counter Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 1584–1588)

      Prof. Sining Yun, Prof. Anders Hagfeldt and Prof. Tingli Ma

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402003

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      The power of film: A small amount of Pt nanoparticles highly distributed on a SiC surface (Pt/SiC) shows superior catalytic activity for I3 reduction. Three different sub-5 μm-thick Pt/SiC films serving as counter electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells show power conversion efficiencies of 6.82, 7.64, and 7.04 % and respectively reach 86.5, 97.0, and 89.3 % of the level obtained by using a print-Pt counter electrode (7.88 %).

    15. Palladium-Catalyzed Silver-Mediated α-Arylation of Acetic Acid: A New Approach for the α-Arylation of Carbonyl Compounds (pages 1589–1593)

      Guo-Jie Wu, Jing Guan, Prof. Fu-She Han and Dr. Yu-Long Zhao

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402061

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      Palladium served on a silver platter: A new approach for the α-arylation of acetic acid through Pd-catalyzed silver-mediated direct C[BOND]H arylation of acetic acid with aryl iodides is presented. This protocol provides a straightforward method for the synthesis of a diverse set of α-phenylacetic acids. Deuteration experiments are performed to help elucidate the reaction mechanism.

    16. Magnifying the Morphology Change Induced by a Nickel Promoter in Tungsten(IV) Sulfide Industrial Hydrocracking Catalyst: A HAADF-STEM and DFT Study (pages 1594–1598)

      Dr. Maria Girleanu, Dr. Thibault Alphazan, Dr. Zoubeyr Boudene, Dr. Audrey Bonduelle-Skrzypczak, Dr. Christèle Legens, Dr. Anne-Sophie Gay, Prof. Dr. Christophe Copéret, Dr. Ovidiu Ersen and Dr. Pascal Raybaud

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402115

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      Up for a promotion: By combining high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis and DFT calculations, the effect of a Ni promoter on the 1D morphology of the NiWS phase supported on amorphous silica-alumina (ASA) is revealed and rationalized. The addition of the Ni promoter induces the observed morphology effect in a catalytically active system relevant for industrial application. TOF=Turnover frequency.

    17. A Simple and Direct Method for the Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Coupling of Unactivated Allylarenes with Classic Arenes (pages 1599–1603)

      Dr. Weiwei Jin, Prof. Wing-Tak Wong and Dr. Ga-Lai Law

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402075

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      They make a great couple: An efficient route to engineer vinylarene structures by PdII-catalyzed oxidative coupling of unactivated allylarenes with classic arenes is developed. The methodology features the use of unactivated allylarenes with no prefunctionalization and classic arenes without installed directing groups. A variety of vinylarenes and their saturated derivatives are obtained.

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Minireview
    8. Highlights
    9. Conference Report
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Tuning Al2O3 Surface with SnO2 to Prepare Improved Supports for Pd for CO Oxidation (pages 1604–1611)

      Prof. Dr. Xiang Wang, Jin Shu Tian, Yu Hua Zheng, Dr. Xiang Lan Xu, Prof. Dr. Wen Ming Liu and Xiu Zhong Fang

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402052

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      The story of three metals: SnO2 is used to modify the surface of Al2O3 to prepare improved composite supports for Pd for CO oxidation. With SnO2/Al2O3 as supports, less amount of Pd can be used to obtain catalysts with competitive performance.

    2. A Salen–Co3+ Catalyst for the Hydration of Terminal Alkynes and in Tandem Catalysis with Ru–TsDPEN for the One-Pot Transformation of Alkynes into Chiral Alcohols (pages 1612–1616)

      Shoufeng Wang, Dr. Chengxia Miao, Wenfang Wang, Prof. Dr. Ziqiang Lei and Prof. Dr. Wei Sun

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400071

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      Stay hydrated: The salen–Co3+ (1) complex is found to efficiently promote the hydration of terminal alkynes to give methyl ketones in the presence of the H2SO4 cocatalyst. In addition, the one-pot transformation of alkynes into chiral alcohols through tandem catalysis of 1 with the ruthenium catalyst 2 is realized in excellent yields and enantioselectivities.

    3. Size-Controlled Synthesis of Tetrametallic Ag@CoNiFe Core–Shell Nanoparticles Supported on Graphene: A Highly Efficient Catalyst for the Hydrolytic Dehydrogenation of Amine Boranes (pages 1617–1625)

      Lan Yang, Dr. Jun Su, Prof. Dr. Wei Luo and Prof. Dr. Gongzhen Cheng

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400042

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      Core–shell casts a spell: Well-dispersed tetrametallic core–shell Ag@CoNiFe/graphene nanoparticles exert a satisfactory catalytic activity and recyclability towards the hydrolysis of ammonia borane and methylamine borane.

    4. Magnetic Superhydrophobic Polymer Nanosphere Cage as a Framework for Miceller Catalysis in Biphasic Media (pages 1626–1634)

      Zhi Zheng, Prof. Jianli Wang, Hualiang Chen, Linbin Feng, Ren Jing, Meizhen Lu, Prof. Bao Hu and Prof. Jianbing Ji

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400009

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      Free from the cage: The use of a magnetic polymer nanosphere cage derived from a Pickering emulsion as a framework for micelle-catalysed biphasic systems has been described. The catalysis results reveal that these fixed micelle-tethered catalysts self-assembled at the water–oil interface demonstrate much higher activity than their soluble counterparts. Moreover, the simple strategy applied for emulsion demulsifying (sonication or magnetic decantation) and re-emulsifying (magnetic stirring) makes this new system technically simple and practically applicable.

    5. Optimized Dispersion and Stability of Hybrid Fe3O4/Pd Catalysts in Water for Suzuki Coupling Reactions: Impact of Organic Capping Agents (pages 1635–1640)

      Hyunje Woo, Kyoungho Lee and Prof. Kang Hyun Park

      Version of Record online: 24 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400067

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      Lemon boost: Immobilized Pd nanoparticles onto Fe3O4 microspheres synthesized with different capping agents exhibit different catalytic activities for Suzuki coupling reactions depending on the dispersion stability in water. Capping by trisodium citrate leads to the highest yield and recyclability with strong and long-term dispersion stability in water. Cit= citrate, PEG= poly- (ethylene glycol), PVP=poly(vinylpyrrolidone).

    6. Palladium-Nanoparticle-Linked Organic Frameworks: Heterogeneous Recyclable Catalysts in Aqueous Medium (pages 1641–1651)

      Sadasivan P. Prakash and Dr. Karical R. Gopidas

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400060

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      Capturing catalysis: Palladium nanoparticles trapped and stabilized within the organic framework through palladium–carbon covalent bonds (PNOFs) are synthesized in a one-step reaction and characterized by several techniques. PNOFs are found to be highly efficient and stable catalysts in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol and Suzuki reactions of aryl chlorides, bromides, and iodides.

    7. Details Behind the Self-Regeneration of Supported NiCo/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 Bimetallic Catalyst in the CH4–CO2 Reforming Reaction (pages 1652–1663)

      Dr. Petar Djinović, Dr. Ilja Gasan Osojnik Črnivec, Dr. Boštjan Erjavec and Prof. Dr. Albin Pintar

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400059

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      Recrystallization raises reactivation: Initial deactivation (blue frame) of NiCo/CeZr catalysts employed for methane dry reforming reactions can be correlated to oxidation of nanosized NiCo particles. With time on stream, sintering and growth (red frame) slowly leads to their reduction and reactivation. Reactivation is additionally promoted by parallel recrystallization of Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 support, which improves oxygen mobility and oxygen storage capacity. DR=Dry reforming.

    8. The Enhancing Effect of Brønsted Acidity of Supported MoOx Species on their Activity and Selectivity in Ethylene/trans-2-Butene Metathesis (pages 1664–1672)

      Tobias Hahn, Dr. Ursula Bentrup, Dr. Marc Armbrüster, Dr. Evgenii V. Kondratenko and Dr. David Linke

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400040

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      Acidity meets structure: The activity and selectivity of MoOx species on different supports in the metathesis of ethylene and trans-2-butene to propene are systematically elucidated and correlated to their structural and acidic properties. Tetrahedral and octahedral MoOx species exhibit enhanced performance with increasing Brønsted acidity.

    9. Cooperative Dehydrogenation Coupling of Isopropanol and Hydrogenation Coupling of Acetone Over a Sodium Tantalate Photocatalyst (pages 1673–1678)

      Baoyue Cao, Jian Zhang, Dr. Jianghong Zhao, Dr. Zhijian Wang, Pengju Yang, Dr. Hongxia Zhang, Li Li and Prof. Zhenping Zhu

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400032

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      Double couple: Dehydrogenation coupling of isopropanol and hydrogenation coupling of acetone can be performed simultaneously on a single NaTaO3 photocatalyst through intermolecular hydrogen transfer and display a remarkable promotive interaction, which speeds the reactions by one order of magnitude and restrains side reactions. CB=conduction band, VB=valence band.

    10. Chemospecific Intramolecular Buchner Reaction Catalyzed by Copper(II) Acetylacetonate (pages 1679–1683)

      Shanyan Mo and Prof. Dr. Jiaxi Xu

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400014

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      Cheap as copper: Copper(II) acetylacetonate is an efficient catalyst in the intramolecular Buchner reaction of N-benzyl-2-cyano-2-diazoacetamides for the chemospecific synthesis of 9-aza-1-cyanobicyclo[5.3.0]deca-2,4,6-trien-10-one derivatives in moderate to excellent yields with a broad substrate scope.

    11. Hierarchically Porous Calcium-containing Manganese Dioxide Nanorod Bundles with Superior Photoelectrochemical Activity (pages 1684–1690)

      Dr. Yan-Gu Lin, Ying-Chu Chen, Dr. Jeffrey T. Miller, Dr. Li-Chyong Chen, Dr. Kuei-Hsien Chen and Prof. Yu-Kuei Hsu

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400012

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      Bundle of nanojoy: A high-activity model in photocatalytic nanosystem is designed comprising mesoporous Ca-containing MnO2 nanorod bundles that are visible-light-sensitive photofunctional electrodes that fundamentally improve the performance of MnO2-based photoanodes for photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation. ITO=indium tin oxide.

    12. Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogen Production from Hydrosilanes and Water (pages 1691–1697)

      Dr. Karin Garcés, Dr. Francisco J. Fernández-Alvarez, Dr. Víctor Polo, Dr. Ralte Lalrempuia, Prof. Jesús J. Pérez-Torrente and Prof. Luis A. Oro

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301107

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      From hydrosilanes to hydrogen: The iridium(III) complex [Ir(H)(CF3SO3)(NSiN)(coe)] is an effective homogeneous catalyst precursor for hydrogen production from the hydrolysis of hydrosilanes (NSiN=fac-coordinated bis(pyridine-2-yloxy)methylsilyl, coe=cyclooctene).

    13. Effect of Composition and Pretreatment Parameters on Activity and Stability of Cu–Al Catalysts for Water–Gas Shift Reaction (pages 1698–1706)

      Rasika B. Mane, Dae-Woon Jeong, Atul V. Malawadkar, Prof. Hyun-Seog Roh and Dr. Chandrashekhar V. Rode

      Version of Record online: 23 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301049

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      Teamwork brings success: The coexistence of various nonzero oxidation state and metallic copper species in a Cu–Al catalyst with 70 atom % Cu yields the highest CO conversion with a stable time on stream (TOS) of 100 h in the water–gas shift reaction (WGSR). PEM=proton-exchange membrane.

    14. Tri-cobalt Carboxylate as a Catalyst and Catalyst Precursor in the Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis (pages 1707–1713)

      Dr. N. Fischer, Prof. E. van Steen and Prof. M. Claeys

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300932

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      Size effect: A supported tri-cobalt carboxylate complex was chosen as a model catalyst to shed light on the structure sensitivity of the Fischer–Tropsch synthesis. In combination with previously published results on supported cobalt crystallites, the knowledge of the size effect of metallic cobalt on activity and selectivity could be extended to the sub-2 nm region. (TOS=time on stream, TOF=turnover frequency).

    15. How to Modulate Catalytic Properties in Nanosystems: The Case of Iron–Ruthenium Nanoparticles (pages 1714–1720)

      Dr. Vinciane Kelsen, Dr. Anca Meffre, Dr. Pier-Francesco Fazzini, Dr. Pierre Lecante and Dr. Bruno Chaudret

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300907

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      Singing a bimetallic tune: The selectivity of FeRu nanocatalysts in hydrogenation reactions can be tuned by adjusting the Ru content in bimetallic FeRu ultrasmall nanoparticles.

    16. The Influence of the Precipitation/Ageing Temperature on a Cu/ZnO/ZrO2 Catalyst for Methanol Synthesis from H2 and CO2 (pages 1721–1730)

      Elias Frei, Dr. Achim Schaadt, Dr. Thilo Ludwig, Prof.Dr. Harald Hillebrecht and Prof.Dr. Ingo Krossing

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300665

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      Magic for methanol: For heterogeneous catalysts, the constitution of the precursor is an important parameter to adjust the properties of the active catalyst. Therefore, we examined the influence of the temperature during the precipitation process and during the ageing time in the mother liquor for a Cu/ZnO/ZrO2 catalyst system. The influence of the synthesis conditions on the catalyst activity for methanol production was analyzed.

    17. Sub-5 nm Pd–Ru Nanoparticle Alloys as Efficient Catalysts for Formic Acid Electrooxidation (pages 1731–1736)

      Dongshuang Wu, Dr. Minna Cao, Min Shen and Prof. Rong Cao

      Version of Record online: 14 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400086

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      The presence of ruthenium: A simple preparation method of Pd–Ru nanoparticle alloys over the whole composition range is presented. Their confined sizes of 3–5 nm are favorable in direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs). The alloyed Ru causes a downshift in d-band center rendering these Pd–Ru alloys highly active and stable towards formic acid oxidation.

    18. Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols on Au Nanocatalyst: Insight to the Roles of the Ni–Al Layered Double Hydroxides Support (pages 1737–1747)

      Jiang Wang, Dr. Xianjun Lang, Prof. Bao Zhaorigetu, Prof. Meilin Jia, Jun Wang, Xiaofang Guo and Prof. Jincai Zhao

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400046

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      Gold–support synergy: Au nanoparticles supported on Ni–Al layered double hydroxides exhibit high chemoselectivity, recyclability, and reproducibility for the liquid-phase aerobic oxidation of alcohols under base-free or even solvent-free conditions. The synergistic effect between the nanoparticles and the layered double hydroxide support dominates the unique catalytic activity, which is also correlated to the complete ordering of cations in the surface layers.

    19. A Falling-Film Microreactor for Enzymatic Oxidation of Glucose (pages 1748–1754)

      Sabine Illner, Christian Hofmann, Dr. Patrick Löb and Prof. Dr. Udo Kragl

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201400028

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      Oxygen intake: An enzyme-catalyzed gas/liquid phase reaction in a falling film microreactor (FFMR) was examined for the first time. The test reaction was the oxidation of β-D-glucose to gluconic acid catalyzed by glucose oxidase. As a result of to the large surface-to-volume ratio, extremely high oxygen transfer rates are achieved.

    20. A First-Principles Study of Carbon–Oxygen Bond Scission in Multiatomic Molecules on Flat and Stepped Metal Surfaces (pages 1755–1762)

      Dr. Yong-Hui Zhao, Jin-Xun Liu, Dr. Hai-Yan Su, Dr. Keju Sun and Prof. Dr. Wei-Xue Li

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301114

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      Step to impress: Multiatomic molecules exhibit distinct carbon–oxygen scission activities from diatomic molecules regardless of the metals (Co, Rh, and Ir) considered: stepped surfaces have a higher barrier for CH3CHO dissociation than flat ones by 0.27 eV at most, in contrast with the much lower barriers for CO dissociation by 0.81–1.29 eV. Blue: Co, red: O, gray: C, white: H.

    21. Fe and Mn-Based Catalysts Supported on γ-Al2O3 for CO Oxidation under O2-Rich Conditions (pages 1763–1773)

      Marina Tepluchin, Maria Casapu, Alexey Boubnov, Henning Lichtenberg, Di Wang, Sven Kureti and Prof. Dr. Jan-Dierk Grunwaldt

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201301040

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      Fire and water: γ-Al2O3-supported MnOx and FeOx-based catalysts prepared by incipient wetness impregnation and single-step flame spray pyrolysis are compared. The synthesis method and transition metal oxide loading (0.1–20 wt %) strongly affects the structure, composition, and redox properties. CO oxidation activity increases with transition metal oxide loading. Below 200 °C, Mn-based catalysts show the highest catalytic performance.

    22. Effect of Textural Structure on the Catalytic Performance of LaCoO3 for CO Oxidation (pages 1774–1781)

      Ping Xiao, Prof. Junjiang Zhu, Hailong Li, Wen Jiang, Tao Wang, Prof. Yujun Zhu, Dr. Yanxi Zhao and Prof. Jinlin Li

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402064

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      It's all in the pores: Porous LaCoO3 that possesses a high surface area, strong oxidizing ability, and more exposed surface Co ions shows better activity for CO oxidation than bulk and SBA-15-supported LaCoO3.

    23. A Glimpse into the Molecular Journey inside an Ultralow Sulfur Diesel Reactor (pages 1782–1787)

      Dr. Tushar V. Choudhary, Dr. Kening Gong, Dr. Phillipp Ellison and Dr. Ayyappan Subbiah

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402028

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      Keeping on the ultralow: Quantitative information about the journey of sulfur molecules inside an operating ultralow sulfur diesel reactor is provided. This information coupled with other new insights obtained under realistic industrial conditions is expected to significantly increase the effectiveness of future studies aimed at increasing the efficiency of the ultralow sulfur diesel process. ppmw=parts per million by weight

    24. Effects of Metal Promotion on the Performance of CuZnAl Catalysts for Alcohol Synthesis (pages 1788–1793)

      Jorge M. Beiramar, Dr. Anne Griboval-Constant and Dr. Andrei Y. Khodakov

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402037

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      Choose your alcohol wisely: The ease of Cu reduction in CuZnAl methanol synthesis catalysts promoted with metals leads to more active catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide and the production of C2+ alcohols. The promotion of CuZnAl catalysts even with small amounts of Cr, Mn, and Fe results in a significant modification in the selectivity patterns.

    25. Design of a Bifunctional Ir–Zr Based Metal–Organic Framework Heterogeneous Catalyst for the N-Alkylation of Amines with Alcohols (pages 1794–1800)

      A. M. Rasero-Almansa, Prof.  A. Corma, Prof. M. Iglesias and Prof. F. Sánchez

      Version of Record online: 5 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201402101

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      Better be direct than elusive: The direct N-alkylation of amines with alcohols is performed with an Ir-Zr-based metal–organic framework multifunctional heterogeneous catalyst. This system is efficient and environmentally benign for the synthesis of various organic amines in air in the absence of a base. The catalyst is recovered and reused without significant loss of activity, and only water is produced as a byproduct.

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