Gas/liquid interfacial area per unit volume and volumetric mass transfer coefficient in stirred slurry reactors

Authors

  • Dr.-Ing. Michael Schmitz,

    1. Lehrstuhl für Thermische Verfahrenstechnik der Abteilung Chemietechnik der Universität Dortmund, Postfach 500 500, D-4600 Dortmund 50
    Current affiliation:
    1. Fa. Enka AG, Werk Oberbruch, Boos Fremery Straße, D-5138 Heinsberg
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  • Dr.-Ing. Artur Steiff,

    1. Lehrstuhl für Thermische Verfahrenstechnik der Abteilung Chemietechnik der Universität Dortmund, Postfach 500 500, D-4600 Dortmund 50
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  • Prof. Dr.-Ing. Paul-Michael Weinspach

    1. Lehrstuhl für Thermische Verfahrenstechnik der Abteilung Chemietechnik der Universität Dortmund, Postfach 500 500, D-4600 Dortmund 50
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Abstract

In three-phase systems, where the liquid constitutes the continuous phase, solid is the catalyst and gas represents the dispersed phase, there are decisive criteria which have to be observed in reactor design. These are e.g. the interfacial area per unit volume between gas and liquid, the volumetric mass transfer coefficient and the mass transfer coefficient. The basic aim of the present work was therefore the investigation of these parameters in relation to the main influencing parameters. Process parameters stirrer speed and superficial gas velocity were varied as well as the physical properties such as liquid viscosity, solids concentration, particle diameter and a geometrical parameter, i.e. reactor diameter. The sulphite method was employed for the determination of these values. The test results confirmed the known relationships of power consumption and superficial gas velocity. An increase in the liquid viscosity leads to a decrease in all the tested values. In most cases, suspended solid particles lead to a lowering of the test values. The influence of the tank diameter on the plots of the test values against specific power consumption turned out to be invariant so that a scale-up of geometrically similar systems can be carried out at constant power consumption, superficial gas velocity and liquid viscosity.

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