Chemical Engineering & Technology

Cover image for Vol. 31 Issue 6

Special Issue: Downstream processing of biotechnological products

June, 2008

Volume 31, Issue 6

Pages 803–927

Issue edited by: Erwin Flaschel

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Overview
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    1. Bromo Seltzer © PhotoDisc/Getty Images (Chem. Eng. Technol. 6/2008)

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200890021

  2. Overview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Overview
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    1. Overview Contents: Chem. Eng. Technol. 6/2008 (page 803)

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200890022

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Overview
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    1. Contents: Chem. Eng. Technol. 6/2008 (pages 804–808)

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200890023

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Overview
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
  5. Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Overview
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    1. Forum: Chem. Eng. Technol. 6/2008 (pages 811–812)

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200890025

  6. Scientific Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Overview
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    1. Scientific Highlights: Chem. Eng. Technol. 6/2008 (pages 813–814)

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200890026

  7. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Overview
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    1. Purification of Bionanoparticles (pages 815–825)

      L. Pedro, S. S. Soares and G. N. M. Ferreira

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200800176

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The most common processes currently used for the purification of nanoparticles are reviewed. Protein nanoparticles are an attractive candidate for gene and molecular therapy due to their relatively easy production and manipulation. Their successful application depends on the availability of selective and scalable methodologies for product recovery and purification.

    2. New Developments in Simulated Moving Bed Chromatography (pages 826–837)

      A. Seidel-Morgenstern, L. C. Keßler and M. Kaspereit

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200800081

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Due to the growing interest in simulated moving bed (SMB) processes, several new concepts are under development, capable of improving the performance and extending the range of successful application of SMB chromatography. This paper describes and discusses the most interesting and promising approaches.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Extraction and Purification of Bioproducts and Nanoparticles using Aqueous Two-Phase Systems Strategies (pages 838–845)

      J. Benavides, O. Aguilar, B. H. Lapizco-Encinas and M. Rito-Palomares

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200800068

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The efficient use of Aqueous Two-Phase Systems (ATPS) for the extraction of proteins, genetic material, low molecular weight compounds, bioparticles, nanoparticles, and cells is highlighted and reviewed. The important role of ATPS in process integration is detailed. Future trends concerning the application of ATPS strategies to address the challenges of bioseparation are discussed.

    4. Downstream Processing: From Egg to Cell Culture-Derived Influenza Virus Particles (pages 846–857)

      M. W. Wolff and U. Reichl

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200800118

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Efforts to control the annual spread of influenza virus have centered on prophylactic vaccinations. The majority of licensed vaccines for human use are still produced in eggs. An overview of unit operations used for the downstream processing of egg and cell culture-derived influenza viruses is given, focusing on commonly applied chromatographic methods.

    5. Downstream Processing of Plasmid DNA for Gene Therapy and Genetic Vaccination (pages 858–863)

      C. Voß

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200800069

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plasmid DNA is used as a cloning vector to deliver recombinant genetic information into microorganisms. Since the 1990s, this principle has also been applied for the delivery of therapeutic genes in gene therapy and genetic vaccination. This non-viral gene delivery is afflicted with fewer safety concerns in comparison to viral systems.

    6. A Review of the Thermodynamics of Protein Association to Ligands, Protein Adsorption, and Adsorption Isotherms (pages 864–874)

      J. M. Mollerup

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200800082

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A desired goal of the PAT framework is to design and develop well understood processes that will consistently ensure a predefined quality at the end of the manufacturing process. This paper reviews a set of scientific principles supporting the development and understanding of models of adsorption isotherms.

  8. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Overview
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    1. Designing Robust Preparative Purification Processes with High Performance (pages 875–882)

      M. Degerman, N. Jakobsson and B. Nilsson

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200800097

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A model-based method for optimizing purification for processes both with regard to performance and robustness is presented. With this as a starting point, the process is then optimized for higher robustness and lower probability of batch failure. The purification of Immunoglobulin G through ion exchange chromatography is used to demonstrate the method.

    2. Evaluation of a Sugarcane Bagasse Acid Hydrolysis Technology (pages 883–892)

      F. de Ávila Rodrigues and R. Guirardello

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200700454

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A mathematical model is used to generate the most favorable operating conditions for glucose and furfural production from sugarcane bagasse. The material and energy balances are performed by UNISim™ software. The suspension mass fraction and the thermal energy consumption are key issues to account for the profitable operation of the plant.

    3. High Throughput Screening for the Design and Optimization of Chromatographic Processes – Miniaturization, Automation and Parallelization of Breakthrough and Elution Studies (pages 893–903)

      M. Wiendahl, P. Schulze Wierling, J. Nielsen, D. Fomsgaard Christensen, J. Krarup, A. Staby and J. Hubbuch

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200800167

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The challenge is to create a large number of data sets with as little sample material as possible within as short a time frame as possible. A potential solution to this is to develop parallel, automated and miniaturized experimental setups and strategies. These three factors combines the high throughput screening using modern liquid handling stations.

    4. You have free access to this content
      A Highly Efficient Procedure for the Extraction of Soluble Proteins from Bacterial Cells with Mild Chaotropic Solutions (pages 904–910)

      V. N. Danilevich, L. E. Petrovskaya and E. V. Grishin

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200800024

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The development of methods for rapid and effective isolation of proteins from Escherichia coli is of considerable interest for biotechnology. Permeabilizing reagents (buffer solutions) for rapid and effective extraction of soluble proteins from the cells of E. coli and other Gram-negative microorganisms were developed without cell wall disruption and the release of DNA into the solution.

    5. Crystalline Proteins as an Alternative to Standard Formulations (pages 911–916)

      D. Hekmat, D. Hebel and D. Weuster-Botz

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200800038

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new approach using biocompatible, hydrophilic, substituted alkylammonium-based ionic liquids (ILs) as additives for the advanced crystallization of two exemplary proteins, lysozyme and lipase, is investigated. Sitting-drop vapor diffusion crystallization experiments reveal that the addition of some of the ILs results in less crystal polymorphism and precipitation is consistently avoided.

    6. Comment on Aspects of Chitosan Preparation (pages 917–921)

      S. E. S. Leonhardt, B. Ondruschka and J. Ondruschka

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200800079

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chitosan, a product of chitin deacetylation, has great potential across a wide spectrum of applications in catalysis. Deacetylation was studied under various conditions and the influence of the reaction parameters on the degree of deacetylation was evaluated and discussed.

    7. Separation and Purification of β-Carotene from Chlorophyll Factory Residues (pages 922–927)

      M. Huang, Y.-J. Xu, Q.-L. Lv and Q.-L. Ren

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200800039

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Silkworm excrements are rich sources of chlorophylls, carotenoids, lutein and flavonoids. One of the useful components, β-carotene, is enriched in the preparation process of chlorophylls from silkworm excrements, and is obtained with high purity through three unit operations of extraction, preparative chromatography and recrystallization.

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