Chemical Engineering & Technology

Cover image for Vol. 33 Issue 8

Special Issue: Mechanical Solid Liquid Separation

August, 2010

Volume 33, Issue 8

Pages 1219–1381

Issue edited by: Harald Anlauf

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Communication
    1. Cover Chem. Eng. Technol. 8/2010

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201090032

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Communication
    1. Editorial Board Chem. Eng. Technol. 8/2010

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201090038

  3. Overview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Communication
    1. Overview Contents: Chem. Eng. Technol. 8/2010 (page 1219)

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201090033

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Communication
    1. Contents: Chem. Eng. Technol. 8/2010 (pages 1220–1225)

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201090034

  5. Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Communication
    1. Forum: Chem. Eng. Technol. 8/2010 (pages 1226–1227)

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201090035

  6. Scientific Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Communication
    1. Scientific Highlights: Chem. Eng. Technol. 8/2010 (pages 1228–1229)

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201090036

  7. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Communication
    1. Mechanical Solid Liquid Separation (page 1231)

      Harald Anlauf

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201090037

  8. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Communication
    1. Membrane Technology for Water Treatment (pages 1233–1240)

      Th. Peters

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000139

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Membrane processes have become very important tools in water management and water related environmental engineering, because their efficiency has been proven from a technical and economical, as well as an ecological, point of view. This review details the theoretical background of these pressure driven membrane processes, examples of their application in water treatment and results for the associated purification efficiency.

    2. Advances in Pore Structure Evaluation by Porometry (pages 1241–1250)

      A. Jena and K. Gupta

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000119

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The theory of porometry is explained. Procedures for the evaluation of pore throat diameter, pore distribution, surface area, and permeability, and the interpretation of results are considered in detail. Porometers with the capability to measure pore structure under compression, at elevated temperatures, under controlled chemical environment, and under many other special situations are considered. The novel techniques, capillary condensation flow porometry and liquid-liquid porometry, are also considered.

    3. Membrane Bioreactors in Waste Water Treatment – Status and Trends (pages 1251–1259)

      M. Kraume and A. Drews

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000104

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Due to their unique advantages like improved effluent quality and small footprint, membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are being increasingly used in waste water treatment. The current status of MBRs is reviewed and trends in MBR design and operation including market capacities and costs, typical and future operational regimes, hybrid configurations, and novel control concepts are reported.

  9. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Communication
    1. Dead-End Dynamic Filtration of Highly Concentrated CaCO3 Suspensions in the Presence of a Dispersant (pages 1260–1268)

      M. Loginov, N. Lebovka, O. Larue, L. H. Ding and E. Vorobiev

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000073

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dewatering of CaCO3 suspensions in the presence of a dispersant by means of the dead-end dynamic filtration technique using a rotating disk was performed. The delayed dispersant addition allowed higher final solid concentration (up to 79.6 wt %) to be reached with low suspension viscosity (below 0.8 Pa s) and minimum dispersant losses in the filtrate.

    2. An Integrated Fouling Monitoring Technique for a Water Treatment Microfiltration Process (pages 1269–1275)

      W.-H. Chen, Y.-H. Hsieh, K. L. Tung, Y. L. Li, S. C. Lai and N. J. Lin

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000003

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An integrated, online fouling monitoring technique that provides dynamic and real-time information of membrane fouling during a water treatment membrane process was developed. This technique provides in situ measurement of fouling layer thickness, dynamic analysis of the fouling layer structure, and monitoring of water quality.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Classification of Fine Particles in High-Speed Centrifuges (pages 1276–1282)

      L. E. Spelter and H. Nirschl

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000089

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This work demonstrates the classification of fine particles in suspension with a semi-continuous tubular-bowl centrifuge. Furthermore, the flow patterns in the rotor of the centrifuge are calculated by computational fluid dynamics for rotational speeds up to 40,000 rpm and throughputs ranging from 0.1 to 2 L/min.

    4. The Porosity, Permeability and Restructuring of Heterogeneous Filter Cakes (pages 1283–1289)

      K. Chellappah, E. S. Tarleton and R. J. Wakeman

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000093

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The constant pressure filtration of fiber/particle mixtures have been studied in relation to the porosity and permeability of the resultant cakes. Interparticle penetration and additive porosity models were applied to the porosity data. Interesting results showing abrupt restructuring of these filter cakes causing anomalous filtration behavior were also presented.

    5. Particle-by-Particle Reconstruction of Ultrafiltration Cakes in 3D from Binarized TEM Images (pages 1290–1296)

      F. Bourgeois and F. Courteille

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000097

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An innovative particle-by-particle reconstruction scheme is presented for simulating ultrafiltration cake microstructure in three dimensions from TEM images. Simulated microstructures are intended for improving our understanding of the relationships between cake morphology, ultrafiltration performance, and operating conditions.

    6. Procedural Investigations of the Lautering Process (pages 1297–1302)

      J. Tippmann, H. Scheuren, J. Voigt and K. Sommer

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000109

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The integration of a bubble generator in the lauter tun which blows nitrogen bubbles through the mash and filter cake, is described as a new method for a faster and more efficient lauter process. The developed system is the result of two principles, evaporation of unwanted flavoring substances and prevention of blocking of the filter cake. Energy costs and CO2 emissions could be reduced by the new lautering device.

    7. Filtering of Clay Colloids in Bentonite Detritus Material (pages 1303–1310)

      T. Richards and I. Neretnieks

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000108

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bentonite clay is one of the supporting materials when spent nuclear waste is stored. If low salinity water passes by, the smectite particles may diffuse into the water and decrease the protection. It was investigated if the larger accessory particles can form a filter cake and prevent the loss.

    8. Adaptation of Optimum Washing Strategies to Product and Process Parameters in Centrifugal Processes (pages 1311–1314)

      F. Ruslim, A. Erk, T. Danner, V. Wenzel and H. Nirschl

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000114

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this paper, the impact of the g-factor on the results of filter cake washing in centrifuges is discussed for different materials. Physical models are used to aid analysis of the dominating mechanisms during washing. Setting an unfavorable g-factor may result in 10 times higher wash liquor consumption.

    9. Efficiency Optimization and Prediction in High-Gradient Magnetic Centrifugation (pages 1315–1320)

      J. Lindner, K. Wagner, C. Eichholz and H. Nirschl

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000112

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By superposing centrifugation and magnetic separation, magnetizable particles, which can be used as carrier particles for selective bioseparation, are isolated in a continuous process out of suspensions. The key component for this process is the magnetic filter. The separation efficiency of one single stage could be enhanced from 51 to 78 % by increasing the wire number and improving the wire cross section.

    10. Dead-End Liposomal Electro-Filtration: Phenol Removal by Dioctadecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Chloride as a Case Study (pages 1321–1326)

      M. Hakimhashem, H. Saveyn, B. De Bock and P. Van der Meeren

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000115

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Phenol removal from wastewater streams is achieved through its sorption by cationic dioctadecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (DODAC) liposomes and a subsequent electric field-enhanced microfiltration of the resulting dispersion. While the sorption is improved by adjusting the pH, filtration flux and retention are optimized by applying an electric field.

    11. Analysis of Particle Fouling in Constant-Pressure Submerged Membrane Filtration (pages 1327–1333)

      K. J. Hwang, H. C. Chen and M. H. Tsai

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000103

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The effects of filtration pressure and aeration conditions on the particle deposition probability, cake properties and filtration flux in submerged membrane filtration are discussed. Particle fouling is analyzed using a force balance model.

    12. Superposed Filtration Mechanisms during Clarification of Very Low Concentrated Suspensions with a Paperstack Candle Filter (pages 1334–1340)

      H. Anlauf and X. Romaní Fernández

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000098

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The concept of using periodically backflushed expandable filter candles has been demonstrated as a successful method of clarifying and purifying metal working oils. The filter principle is based on filter candles consisting of an expandable stack of paper rings. Filter experiments, CFD simulations and theoretical considerations should lead to the possibility of reliable filtration forecasts on the basis of minimal experimental test work.

    13. Effects of Soft Particle Deformability and Particle/Pore Size Ratio on the Blocking Mechanism in Dead-End Microfiltration (pages 1341–1348)

      K. L. Tung, C. C. Hu, C. J. Chuang, K. J. Hwang and T. Y. Wu

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000099

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Variously deformed S. cerevisiae yeast particles were microfiltrated to examine the blocking mechanism due to particle deposition during the initial stage of microfiltration. Deformation of soft particles facilitates the intrusion of particles into membrane pores, causing a severe decline in flux. Increasing particle hardness results in a decrease in pore blockage and increased filtrate flux.

    14. Influence of Filter Cloth Behavior on the Layout of Cake Forming Filters (pages 1349–1357)

      E. Ehrfeld

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000135

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In order to determine the exact influence of filter cloth behavior on the layout of cake forming filters, it is a requirement to carry out laboratory tests in an exact manner. A method is described to determine the filter cloth resistance by lab-scale tests under real conditions.

    15. Two-Dimensional Mass-Transfer Model of a Flat-Plate Dialyzer with Ultrafiltration Operation (pages 1358–1368)

      J.-W. Tu and C.-D. Ho

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.200900566

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The mass transfer of a flat-plate dialyzer with ultrafiltration operation is modeled and studied experimentally. A two-dimensional mass-transfer model is developed to predict the concentration distribution and the mass transfer rate of the dialysis-and-ultrafiltration system. The accuracy of the proposed mathematical model is also confirmed experimentally.

    16. You have free access to this content
      Classification of Suspensions by Means of Rotating Filter Discs and Autodynamic High-Frequency Backwashing (pages 1369–1376)

      L. Steinke and S. Ripperger

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000150

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new method for the classification of suspensions by means of rotating filter discs is presented. High-frequency autodynamic backwashing results from an overpressure fluctuation between the filtrate and concentrate sides, resulting in different flow directions of the filtrate volume flow. It is demonstrated that the separation of coarse particles is entirely possible.

  10. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Communication
    1. Modeling Sieving Filtration using Multiple Layers of Parallel Pores (pages 1377–1381)

      U. Beuscher

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000123

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Transient experimental data for filtration efficiency shows a decrease in performance over time. This behavior is compared to a simple multi-layer modeling approach using a size exclusion particle retention mechanism. Several model variations are explored and the experimental data is represented well after optimizing input parameter and pore selection rules.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION