Chemical Engineering & Technology

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 1

Special Issue: Preparative Chromatography and Downstream Processing

January, 2012

Volume 35, Issue 1

Pages 3–203

Issue edited by: F. Svec

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Forum
    8. Scientific Highlights
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Chem. Eng. Technol. 1/2012

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201190082

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Forum
    8. Scientific Highlights
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. Editorial Board Chem. Eng. Technol. 1/2012

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201190085

  3. Overview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Forum
    8. Scientific Highlights
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. Overview Contents: Chem. Eng. Technol. 1/2012 (page 3)

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201190086

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Forum
    8. Scientific Highlights
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Contents: Chem. Eng. Technol. 1/2012 (pages 4–9)

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201190087

  5. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Forum
    8. Scientific Highlights
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preparative Chromatography and Downstream Processing (page 11)

      Frantisec Svec and Barbara Böck

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201190081

  6. Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Forum
    8. Scientific Highlights
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. Forum: Chem. Eng. Technol. 1/2012 (pages 12–13)

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201190083

  7. Scientific Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Forum
    8. Scientific Highlights
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. Scientific Highlights: Chem. Eng. Technol. 1/2012 (pages 14–15)

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201190084

  8. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Forum
    8. Scientific Highlights
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. Simulated Moving Bed Chromatography: From Concept to Proof-of-Concept (pages 17–34)

      P. Sá Gomes and A. E. Rodrigues

      Article first published online: 2 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100281

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The development of a chromatographic separation by means of one of its most successful continuous countercurrent moving bed processes, the simulated moving bed (SMB), is detailed up to the demonstration stage. The concept of SMB, its applications, and the more relevant nonconventional operation modes are revised and the design, modeling, construction, and operation of a flexible SMB unit are addressed.

    2. Countercurrent Chromatography, Scope and Perspectives: Application to Chirotechnology (pages 35–45)

      C. Minguillón

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100320

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      Countercurrent chromatography (CCC) is a liquid-liquid separation technique particularly adapted to preparative separations. The characteristics of this technique are commented to provide the reader with a view on the possibilities, advantages and limitations of CCC in its diverse range of applications.

    3. Mathematical Modeling of Protein Chromatograms (pages 46–57)

      M. E. Lienqueo, A. Mahn, J. C. Salgado and C. Shene

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100282

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      The use of the theoretical plate concept and the general rate model (GRM) for simulating protein chromatograms in size exclusion, ion exchange, affinity, and hydrophobic interaction is reviewed. Adsorption kinetics and parameters used in the modeling were presented. Based on different examples, the GRM turned out to be the most complete and informative model.

  9. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Forum
    8. Scientific Highlights
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. Development of a Microrectification Apparatus for Analytical and Preparative Applications (pages 58–71)

      A. Ziogas, V. Cominos, G. Kolb, H.-J. Kost, B. Werner and V. Hessel

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100505

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Efficient microrectification equipment that can be operated intermittently or continuously was developed. The equipment can be used for both analytical and preparative separations of mixtures of liquid substances. Different binary systems were separated.

    2. Sequential Centrifugal Partition Chromatography: A New Continuous Chromatographic Technology (pages 72–82)

      E. Hopmann, J. Goll and M. Minceva

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100266

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      A method for the selection of the operating parameters of a relatively new type of continuous chromatographic process, called sequential centrifugal partition chromatography, is proposed and validated experimentally for the complete separation of a model binary mixture. The particularity of the process lies in the use of a solid- support-free liquid stationary phase.

    3. Chromatographic Separation and Purification of Mitotane Racemate in a Varicol Multicolumn Continuous Process (pages 83–90)

      A. C. da Silva Jr., A. G. Salles Jr., R. F. Perna, C. R. D. Correia and C. C. Santana

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100209

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The first continuous preparative chromatographic separation and purification of antineoplastic mitotane racemic mixtures with amylose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) as stationary phase and acetonitrile-isopropanol mixtures as mobile phases are described. The enantiomeric purities obtained were 97.0 % for S-(–)-mitotane and 96.8 % for R-(+)-mitotane in the raffinate and extract streams.

    4. Insights into Protein Sorption and Desorption on Dextran-Modified Ion-Exchange Media (pages 91–101)

      B. D. Bowes, S. J. Traylor, S. M. Timmick, K. J. Czymmek and A. M. Lenhoff

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100304

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Several techniques are used to study the similarities and differences in protein sorption on ion-exchange resins with and without dextran modifiers. Confocal microscopy images indicate significant anisotropy differences between free and adsorbed protein, but little difference between resins and proteins. Images of protein elution demonstrate significantly slower elution due to the dextran modifiers.

    5. A Method for Deriving Explicit Binary Isotherms Obeying the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (pages 102–108)

      A. Tarafder and M. Mazzotti

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100274

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chromatography practitioners are often confronted with the need of using complex isotherms, possibly with inflection points, to model the retention behavior. In the case of mixtures, combining such isotherms is a challenge. The effectiveness of a method based on the ideal adsorption solution theory is demonstrated to obtain explicit binary isotherms in these difficult and important cases.

    6. Combination of Rigorous and Statistical Modeling for Process Development of Plant-Based Extractions Based on Mass Balances and Biological Aspects (pages 109–132)

      M. Kassing, U. Jenelten, J. Schenk, R. Hänsch and J. Strube

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100268

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A rigorous model supported by botanical investigations with SEM, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and Raman/IR-spectroscopy to predict percolation results has been developed. After determining the maximum target compound content in the raw material and the desorption isotherm with maceration experiments, percolation experiments can be predicted and different process scenarios can be calculated.

    7. Response Surface Optimization of Essential Oil and Diosgenin Extraction from Tribulus terrestris via Supercritical Fluid Technology (pages 133–141)

      S. M. Ghoreishi, E. Bataghva and A. A. Dadkhah

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100091

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The essential oil and diosgenin from the T. terrestris fruit were extracted by supercritical CO2. In order to maximize the recovery using the response surface method, the effects of extraction dynamic time, supercritical fluid pressure, temperature, and flow rate were investigated. The obtained data were adequately fitted into two second-order polynomial models for essential oil and diosgenin.

    8. Process Development for Antibody Purification from Tobacco by Protein A Affinity Chromatography (pages 142–148)

      C. Hey and C. Zhang

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100259

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Protein A chromatography was performed with three different protein A resins from Millipore for antibody purification from tobacco. Experiments were run with extracts from nontransgenic tobacco and the model antibody human IgG. The efficiency of different wash buffers to reduce nonspecific binding of native tobacco proteins to the resins was evaluated by altering the ionic strength and pH.

    9. Highlighting Important Parameters Often Neglected in Numerical Optimization of Preparative Chromatography (pages 149–156)

      J. Samuelsson, M. Enmark, P. Forssén and T. Fornstedt

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100210

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Important but previously neglected parameters in numerical optimization of preparative batch chromatography were investigated. Critical factors are an error in the holdup volume determination, use of a rectangular injection profile instead of the measured injection profile, and selection of a numerical algorithm to solve a column model.

    10. Optimization and Performance of Silica-Based Media for Industrial-Scale Antibody Purification (pages 157–160)

      H. Miyahara, R. Nakashima, M. Inoue, T. Katsuda, H. Yamaji and S. Katoh

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100245

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A silica-based medium with optimized pore size, pore volume, and coupling density was developed for protein A affinity chromatography, to be used for industrial purification of IgG. Compared with common protein A media, it provided a high mass transfer rate and high dynamic binding capacities for IgG.

    11. Design of Fructooligosaccharide Separation Using Simulated Moving-Bed Chromatography (pages 161–168)

      K. Vaňková and M. Polakovič

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100254

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Simulated moving bed chromatography separation of fructooligosaccharides was optimized through design simulations based on experimental data obtained in previous works. The optimization criterion was the productivity of the fructooligosaccharides at the required purity and yield when eluent consumption and product dilution were the other performance criteria.

    12. Supporting Design and Control of a Reversed-Phase Chromatography Step by Mechanistic Modeling (pages 169–175)

      K. Westerberg, N. Borg, N. Andersson and B. Nilsson

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000505

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      The control strategy influences the design space and process performance and should be chosen together with the operating point and design space. Mechanistic modeling is applied to design and evaluate control strategies for product pooling in preparative chromatography. The effect of the control strategy choice on process performance under process disturbances is demonstrated.

    13. Supercritical Fractionation of Rosemary Extracts to Improve the Antioxidant Activity (pages 176–182)

      G. Vicente, M. R. García-Risco, T. Fornari and G. Reglero

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100367

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      Supercritical CO2 extraction of rosemary during varying fractionation times was studied to improve the extract antioxidant activity. The best fractionation scheme comprised a first period to eliminate the essential oil from the plant matrix and a second period in which a product with high antioxidant activity was obtained. A product with twofold increased carnosic acid content, high yield, and high antioxidant activity was obtained.

    14. Model-Based Process Challenge of an Industrial Ion-Exchange Chromatography Step (pages 183–190)

      K. Westerberg, E. Broberg Hansen, M. Degerman, T. Budde Hansen and B. Nilsson

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000560

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      Biopharmaceutical process development needs to be faster while remaining safe. Using modeling in the process challenge increases the process understanding, enables more parameters to be included in the study and directs experimental efforts. A suggested methodology is shown for the chromatographic purification of a therapeutic protein.

    15. Integration of Reverse-Osmosis Unit Operations in Biotechnology Process Design (pages 191–197)

      F. Grote, H. Fröhlich and J. Strube

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100182

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      The previously proposed new stepwise approach to model membrane unit operations generally in combination with experimental model parameter determination was successfully transferred to a reverse-osmosis unit. Together with lab-scale experiments it was demonstrated that prediction of the purification performance a priori by simulations for unknown multicomponent salt mixtures is possible.

    16. Rational Method for Designing Efficient Chromatography Processes based on the Iso-Resolution Curve (pages 198–203)

      M. Hosono, R. Maeda, N. Yoshimoto and S. Yamamoto

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100356

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A method for designing efficient chromatography processes was proposed and verified by experiment. The distribution coefficient was determined as a function of ethanol concentration by linear gradient elution experiments. Iso-resolution curves were found to be useful for determining suitable separation conditions.

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