Chemical Engineering & Technology

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 10

October, 2012

Volume 35, Issue 10

Pages 1719–1895

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Overview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Chem. Eng. Technol. 10/2012

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201290060

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Overview
    1. Editorial Board Chem. Eng. Technol. 10/2012

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201290061

  3. Overview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Overview
    1. Overview Contents: Chem. Eng. Technol. 10/2012 (page 1719)

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201290062

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Overview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Contents: Chem. Eng. Technol. 10/2012 (pages 1720–1726)

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201290063

  5. Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Overview
    1. Forum: Chem. Eng. Technol. 10/2012 (pages 1728–1729)

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201290064

  6. Scientific Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Overview
    1. Scientific Highlights: Chem. Eng. Technol. 10/2012 (pages 1730–1731)

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201290065

  7. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Overview
    1. Recent Advances in Microbial Fuel Cells Integrated with Sludge Treatment (pages 1733–1743)

      Z. Wang, X. Mei, J. Ma and Z. Wu

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200132

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising technology for the production of electricity from waste-activated sludge (WAS). A critical review on recent progresses in MFCs powered by WAS summarizes related publications on MFC reactor designs, MFC performan-ces, and sludge degradation efficiencies. Challenges and corresponding enhancement measures of MFCs applying WAS as fuel are discussed as well.

  8. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Overview
    1. Optimization of the Cementation Process for the Removal of Copper in Process Effluent Discharges (pages 1744–1750)

      M. Nazim, P. Pal, A. Al Shoaibi and A. Elkamel

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100492

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Copper cementation is a useful technique for the recovery of copper from a variety of waste solutions. Here, copper cementation on iron substrates in batch process was investigated. Various parameters played a major role on the yield of copper-iron cementation. A statistical full factorial design was carried out and optimization studies were done.

    2. Modeling of CO2-Hydrate Formation at the Gas-Water Interface in Sand Sediment (pages 1751–1758)

      T. Takahashi, T. Sato, M. Inui, S. Hirabayashi and P. E. Brumby

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100275

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A mathematical model for the formation of CO2-hydrate in sand sediment is proposed for sub-seabed geological storage of CO2 in the form of gas hydrate, considering gas diffusion through the CO2-hydrate film and the presence of a fresh reaction interface. CO2-hydrate formation was numerically simulated by solving a heat transfer equation.

    3. Thermodynamic Analysis-Based Improvement for the Boil-off Gas Reliquefaction Process of Liquefied Ethylene Vessels (pages 1759–1764)

      Y. Li, G. Jin and Z. Zhong

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200019

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A cost-effective optimization design of the boil-off gas (BOG) reliquefaction process for liquefied ethylene vessels is proposed. The performances of the reliquefaction system and refrigeration cycle are investigated based on the exergy analysis. The exergy efficiency of the improved refrigeration cycle is significantly increased as well as the energy utilization efficiency of the BOG reliquefaction process.

    4. Modeling of Conjugated Heat Transfer in Direct-Contact Membrane Distillation of Seawater Desalination Systems (pages 1765–1776)

      C.-D. Ho, T.-J. Yang and B.-C. Wang

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100586

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Modeling equations were developed theoretically for the temperature distribution and temperature polarization profiles in a laminar concurrent-flow parallel-plate direct-contact membrane distillation (DCMD) module. The feed velocity effect on the temperature profiles and average Nusselt number was examined. Good agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions was achieved.

    5. Adsorbent Evaluation Based on Experimental Breakthrough Curves: Separation of p-Xylene from C8 Isomers (pages 1777–1785)

      M. S. P. Silva, M. A. Moreira, A. F. P. Ferreira, J. C. Santos, V. M. T. M. Silva, P. Sá Gomes, M. Minceva, J. P. B. Mota and A. E. Rodrigues

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100672

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A method based on experimental breakthrough curves for quickly evaluating adsorbents for a defined separation in terms of selective volume, capacity, selectivity and productivity is demonstrated under the conditions of the Parex process. Fixed-bed experiments are carried out in order to assess a barium-exchanged faujasite-type zeolite as adsorbent for the separation of p-xylene from its isomers.

    6. Optimal Integration of Directly Combined Hydrophobic Interaction and Ion Exchange Chromatography Purification Processes (pages 1786–1796)

      C. Helling, C. Borrmann and J. Strube

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200043

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The potential of a model based process design is demonstrated. Hereby, it will be shown that the sum of the single optima of each unit operation is not equal to the total process optimum. Using the example of a combined chromatographic two-step separation the resulting benefits will be pointed out.

    7. Influence of Salt Concentration and Nitrogen Source on Growth and Productivity of Anaerobiosprillum succiniciproducens (pages 1797–1802)

      K. Bretz and S. Kabasci

      Article first published online: 11 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200101

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Maximum specific growth rate and succinic acid production could be increased by reducing the salt concentration, optimizing the organic nitrogen source and adjusting the pH. In fed-batch experiments, the final succinic acid concentration was 25.6 % higher compared to the reference. Furthermore, the results indicated that A. succiniciproducens consumes only organic nitrogen.

    8. Fluid Dynamics of Vibrofluidized Beds during the Transient Period of Water Evaporation and Drying of Solutions (pages 1803–1809)

      L. Meili, F. B. Freire, M. do Carmo Ferreira and J. T. Freire

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200147

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The transient period of water evaporation and drying of different solutions was studied to describe the fluid dynamic behavior of a vibrofluidized bed operating with inert particles. The pressure drop and air velocity on the bed were investigated as function of the amplitude, frequency, and dimensionless vibration number.

    9. Correlation of the Drop Size in a Modified Scheibel Extraction Column (pages 1810–1816)

      S. Yuan, Y. Shi, H. Yin, Z. Chen and J. Zhou

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100470

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Sauter mean drop sizes of the dispersed phase in a three-stage modified Scheibel extraction column with no mass transfer were investigated. A precise correlation with operation conditions and system physical properties applied to liquid-liquid systems with low interfacial surface tension was proposed for calculating the dispersed-phase mean drop size.

    10. A Modified Approach for Generating Column Grand Composite Curves (pages 1817–1824)

      Z. Wei, S. Wu, B. Zhang, Q. Chen and C.-W. Hui

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100668

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A modified approach is proposed to improve the accuracy of CGCC generation. For the feed stage treated as a stripping (or rectifying) section stage in the existing top-down (or bottom-up) approaches leading to ambiguity at the feed stage, new calculation equations for the f-1th and fth stage are formulated and an indicator is defined and used to evaluate these approaches.

    11. Thermodynamic Analysis of Nonoxidative Dehydroaromatization of Methane (pages 1825–1832)

      P. Moghimpour Bijani, M. Sohrabi and S. Sahebdelfar

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100436

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Equilibrium conversion and product selectivity in methane dehydroaromatization is strongly influenced by reaction conditions. The use of common coke-removing agents such as steam and hydrogen severely impact the equilibrium methane conversion and/or product selectivity rendering this approach unsuitable to cope with the main technical problem of the process, namely coke formation.

    12. Gas Permeation through Polydimethylsiloxane Membranes: Comparison of Three Model Combinations (pages 1833–1841)

      D. Lin, Z. Ding, L. Liu and R. Ma

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100718

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gas permeation through a membrane was analyzed by comparing three combinations of a mass transfer model with a thermodynamic model. The differences among the three model combinations increase with gas solubility. Among the considered model combinations, Maxwell-Stefan equation with the UNIQUAC equation gives the least prediction deviation.

    13. Gas-Liquid Mass Transfer Characteristics in a Rotating-Drum Bioreactor (pages 1842–1848)

      Q. Zhang, Z. Wang, S. Wen, G. Liu, X. Wu and W. Cong

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200172

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The effects of reactor configuration and operation conditions on mass transfer performance were investigated in a new medium-sized rotating-drum bioreactor (RDB). Compared with the stirred bioreactor and traditional RDBs, the novel bioreactor exhibits a better mass transfer performance. An empirical correlation to predict the volumetric mass transfer coefficient is proposed for the design of a bioreactor.

    14. Cumene Hydroperoxide Hydrogenation on a Pd/Al2O3 Catalyst in a Trickle Bed Reactor – Kinetics of Hydrogenation and Deactivation (pages 1849–1856)

      Y. Ma and Q.-C. Zhu

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100657

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A comprehensive investigation of the catalytic hydrogenation of cumene hydroperoxide in cumene over a Pd/Al2O3 catalyst is presented, including the effects of residence time, reaction temperature and H2 pressure on conversion and catalyst deactivation. Attempts are made to simulate the performance of operating conditions with kinetic models.

    15. Investigation of Promoted Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 Methanol Steam Reforming Nanocatalysts by Full Factorial Design (pages 1857–1864)

      H. Sharifi Pajaie and M. Taghizadeh

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200170

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      For hydrogen production by methanol steam reforming, Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 nanocatalysts modified by adding small amounts of Ba, Zr, and Ce oxides were prepared by coprecipitation and oxalate coprecipitation. Catalysts obtained by means of the coprecipitation method exhibited a better performance. Selected promoters (Zr, Ce, and Ba) had a noticeable impact on the properties of the Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst.

    16. Microchannel Emulsification Using Stainless-Steel Chips: Oil Droplet Generation Characteristics (pages 1865–1871)

      I. Kobayashi, Y. Wada, Y. Hori, M. A. Neves, K. Uemura and M. Nakajima

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200044

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The development of stainless-steel microchannel emulsification chips, each consisting of uniform-sized parallel channels and a terrace, is described. The production of highly monodisperse O/W emulsions with controllable droplet size demonstrated the usability of these stainless-steel chips. The influence of the dispersed-phase velocity in a channel on droplet generation characteristics is discussed.

    17. Behavior of Pieces of Plastic Sheet in Solid-Liquid Fluidized Bed with Stirring (pages 1872–1878)

      Y. Tatemoto, T. Michikoshi, T. Higashino, S. Maeda, S. Maeda and Y. Bando

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200201

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A solid-liquid fluidized bed of inert particles was used to separate a pure object from a mixture. Pieces of plastic sheet were used as the objects for separation. When the bed was stirred, the existing height of the object in the bed changed with the liquid velocity, i.e., the separation of pieces of plastic sheet by density was possible.

    18. Simultaneous Removal of NO and SO2 from Flue Gas by UV/H2O2/CaO (pages 1879–1884)

      Y. X. Liu, J. Zhang, Z. Wang and M. Du

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200035

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The effects of several influencing factors (CaO and H2O2 concentration, gas flow, solution temperature, NO, SO2, O2 and CO2 concentration) on the simultaneous removal of NO and SO2 from flue gas by using a UV/H2O2/CaO process were studied in a UV bubbling column reactor. It was found that, under all experimental conditions, this process achieved a SO2 removal efficiency of 100 %.

    19. Resuspension of Abiotic Particles from Ceramic Membranes (pages 1885–1891)

      T. Quadt and E. Schmidt

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200186

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Adhesion is the most important factor when dealing with particle resuspension from a membrane surface but a direct, online measurement of the acting adhesion forces during a filtration process seems technically not feasible. Experiments are introduced that enable a time-resolved measurement of particle resuspension from a membrane surface and the possibility to estimate the acting adhesion forces.

  9. Overview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Overview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Overview Contents: Chemie Ingenieur Technik 10/2012 (page 1895)

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201290066

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