Chemical Engineering & Technology

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 8

Special Issue: Best of ECCE and ECAB: Chemical Engineering and Applied Biotechnology

August, 2012

Volume 35, Issue 8

Pages 1327–1544

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Essay
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Chem. Eng. Technol. 8/2012

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201290046

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Essay
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. Editorial Board Chem. Eng. Technol. 8/2012

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201290047

  3. Overview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Essay
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Essay
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Essay
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
  6. Scientific Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Essay
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
  7. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Essay
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. Teaching Safety in Chemical Engineering: What, How and Who? (pages 1341–1345)

      M. J. Pitt

      Version of Record online: 23 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200024

      Safety is easy to say but hard to achieve, so how should this complex subject be taught? Industry and higher education must act together, taking into account the needs and capability of the person who is going to learn.

  8. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Essay
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. Hydrodynamics and Mass Transfer in Gas-Liquid Flows in Microreactors (pages 1346–1358)

      P. Sobieszuk, J. Aubin and R. Pohorecki

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100643

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An overview on recent studies of hydrodynamics and mass transfer in gas-liquid microreactors with closed and open microchannels is presented. Special emphasis is laid on Taylor or slug flow in closed channels as a regime which seems to be most adapted for practical engineering applications. Insight on bubble generation, liquid-phase hydrodynamics, pressure drop, and mass transfer is provided.

    2. Engineering Strategies for Successful Development of Functional Polymers Using Oxidative Enzymes (pages 1359–1372)

      G. S. Nyanhongo, E. Nugroho Prasetyo, E. Herrero Acero and G. M. Guebitz

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100590

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Enzyme application in polymer engineering is rapidly increasing. Over the years, it has become clear that the successful development of functional polymers requires careful reaction engineering skills and expertise from many disciplines. This review summarizes the different strategies and approaches available to successfully modify, synthesize or functionalize polymers using oxidative enzymes.

  9. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Forum
    7. Scientific Highlights
    8. Essay
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    1. Multiscale Simulation of the Fluidized Bed Granulation Process (pages 1373–1380)

      M. Dosta, S. Antonyuk and S. Heinrich

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200075

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      A novel simulation concept for calculation of the fluidized bed spray granulation process is presented and implemented into the multiscale simulation environment. The new concept allows accomplishing the calculation of a whole production plant and can be extended and effectively applied for other apparatuses and production processes in the solids industry.

    2. Systematic Multi-Scale Model Development Strategy for the Fragrance Spraying Process and Transport (pages 1381–1391)

      M. Heitzig, Y. Rong, C. Gregson, G. Sin and R. Gani

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100604

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      The modeling of the spraying process of a fragrance product, e.g., air freshener, fine fragrance, is of high importance for the fragrance industry to be able to evaluate and improve the product properties. A generic modeling template for the systematic and fast derivation of specific and reliable fragrance aerosol models is proposed and highlighted with a case study.

    3. Dimensioning Multipartition Dividing Wall Columns (pages 1392–1404)

      Ž. Olujić, I. Dejanović, B. Kaibel and H. Jansen

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100709

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      A design approach allowing sizing of single- and multipartition wall dividing wall columns (DWCs) is introduced and demonstrated for three different configurations of a packed four-product DWC. To maximize the energy-saving potential, such four-product DWCs need to be implemented as a fully thermally coupled column.

    4. Evaluating Process Sustainability Using Flowsheet Monitoring (pages 1405–1411)

      W. M. Barrett Jr and J. van Baten

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100603

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      A standardized mechanism for obtaining process information directly from a process simulation using the strongly integrated flowsheet monitoring interface set is proposed. An implementation of the US EPA waste reduction algorithm is presented that uses flowsheet monitoring to access process flow information from a process modeled with a CAPE-OPEN compliant flowsheeting environment.

    5. Design of Monitoring and Sensor Systems for Bioprocesses by Biomechatronic Methodology (pages 1412–1420)

      C.-F. Mandenius

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100553

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      Principle and applications of the biomechatronic design methodology are discussed for the design of monitoring and sensor systems for biotechnological processes in order to meet the process economical and regulatory requirements on the manufacturing process and by systematically considering and ranking analytical alternatives commercially available, thereby leading to more efficient design solutions.

    6. Solid-State NMR Investigations of Supported Ionic Liquid Phase Water-Gas Shift Catalysts: Ionic Liquid Film Distribution vs. Catalyst Performance (pages 1421–1426)

      M. Haumann, A. Schönweiz, H. Breitzke, G. Buntkowsky, S. Werner and N. Szesni

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200025

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Film formation of ionic liquids on porous silica material was investigated by means of N2 sorption analysis and solid-state NMR. Results from ionic liquid loading variation in the gas phase water-gas shift reaction using ruthenium-supported ionic liquid phase catalysts are presented. The NMR technique provides reliable data for film formation and distribution and enables optimization of such catalysts in the future.

    7. Discrete Element Study of Aerogel Particle Dynamics in a Spouted Bed Apparatus (pages 1427–1434)

      S. Antonyuk, S. Heinrich and I. Smirnova

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200083

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The particle dynamics of aerogels in a spouted bed apparatus used for their coating was numerically studied with the help of Discrete Particle Model. The mechanical properties of aerogel particles, like stiffness and modulus of elasticity were experimen-tally obtained. The effect of the increasing density and decreasing restitution coefficient of the particles due to the growth of the coating layer was analyzed.

    8. Blade-Granule Bed Stress in a Cylindrical High-Shear Granulator: Variability Studies (pages 1435–1447)

      E. L. Chan, G. K. Reynolds, B. Gururajan, A. D. Salman and M. J. Hounslow

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200065

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The variability of the impeller blade-granule bed stress, granule bed surface velocity, and bed height in a high-shear granulator under frictional, toroidal, and fluidized flow regimes was studied and proved to be related to the flow regimes of the dry granule beds at different impeller speeds, granule sieve sizes, and granule bed loads. The blade-bed stress was evaluated by discrete element method simulations.

    9. Efficient Chemo-Enzymatic Epoxidation Using silcoat-Novozym®435: Characterizing the Multiphase System (pages 1448–1455)

      S. Bhattacharya, A. Drews, E. Lyagin, M. Kraume and M. B. Ansorge-Schumacher

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100640

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      silcoat-NZ435 was successfully applied to biocatalyze a solvent-free chemo-enzymatic epoxidation reaction of a model alkene 1-dodecene in a multiphase system. The system was operated without mass transfer limitations and provided yields of up to 80 % and excellent selectivity of almost 100 % for the reaction.

    10. Detection, Quantification, and Propagation of Uncertainty in High-Throughput Experimentation by Monte Carlo Methods (pages 1456–1464)

      A. Osberghaus, P. Baumann, S. Hepbildikler, S. Nath, M. Haindl, E. von Lieres and J. Hubbuch

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100610

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In a case study including miniaturized screenings on robotic platforms it could be demonstrated that a simulation algorithm in combination with Monte Carlo sampling is applicable for uncertainty propagation calculation in a high-throughput process. Based on this example, a general strategy for uncertainty analysis in more complex high-throughput experimentation should be developed as a standard.

    11. Using the Discrete Element Method for Predicting the Mixing Behavior of Gravity Blenders in Different Operation Modes (pages 1465–1472)

      R. Weiler, M. Ripp, G. Dau and S. Ripperger

      Version of Record online: 29 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201100645

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The potential of the discrete element method (DEM) for prediction of the mixing behavior of gravity blenders is demonstrated. Numerical simulations for deter-mination of the residence time distributions of gravity blenders are described. DEM proved to be a valuable instrument for bulk mechanics to investigate the processes dealing with the handling of bulk materials.

    12. Enhancement Factor for Gas Absorption in a Finite Liquid Layer. Part 3: Instantaneous and Second-Order Reactions in a Liquid in Laminar Flow (pages 1473–1485)

      J. Yue, E. V. Rebrov and J. C. Schouten

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200160

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Enhancement factor expressions are developed for the cases of gas absorption with an instantaneous reaction and a second-order reaction in a finite liquid layer in laminar flow. The predictions according to the penetration theory tend to give erroneous results in the enhancement factor at Fourier numbers above 0.1.

    13. Screening of Colloids by Semicontinuous Centrifugation (pages 1486–1494)

      L. E. Spelter, K. Meyer and H. Nirschl

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200050

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The introductory part of the paper reviews the techniques available for the classification of particles in the gas and liquid phase. Furthermore, the limitation of screening by sedimentation due to diffusion is exemplified. The main part deals with the screening of colloidal polystyrene and fine kaolin with a semicontinuous centrifuge.

    14. Recommendations for the Production of Silicon Carbide-derived Carbon Based on Intrinsic Kinetic Data (pages 1495–1503)

      T. Knorr, F. Strobl, F. Glenk and B. J. M. Etzold

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200110

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The regression of detailed kinetic data for the conversion of silicon carbide into porous carbon is presented. The carbon is an upcoming – well defined – porous solid. Beside kinetic data, recommendations for an efficient up scale of the production process are given such as critical particle size to avoid mass transport limitation during the production process.

    15. Looking at the Cost: Using Flow Analysis to Assess and Improve Chemical Production Processes (pages 1504–1514)

      A. Bode, J. Bürkle, B. Hoffner and T. Wisniewski

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200046

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Process alternatives for the improved use of material and energy and to reduce costs are more effectively identified through the use of suitable tools and methods. In addition to material and energy balance, suitable cost allocation to flows and process steps helps to identify process variants.

    16. Application of Polyaniline and Polyaniline/Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes-Coated Fibers for Analysis of Ecstasy (pages 1515–1519)

      A. R. Khajeamiri, F. Kobarfard and A. Bayandori Moghaddam

      Version of Record online: 23 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201000509

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polyaniline/multiwalled carbon nanotubes-coated platinum wires were prepared by electrodeposition and investigated for their capability to extract methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) from tablets. The composite material with carbon nanotubes has both an augmented surface area and an enhanced adsorptive capacity which leads to an increased extractive capacity for MDMA.

    17. You have free access to this content
      Simulation of a Compact Multichannel Membrane Reactor for the Production of Pure Hydrogen via Steam Methane Reforming (pages 1520–1533)

      A. Vigneault, S. S. E. H. Elnashaie and J. R. Grace

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200029

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A steady-state 2D model of a multichannel membrane reactor (MCMR) for the production of pure hydrogen is presented. The feasibility of coupling a Pd membrane for realistic conditions is evaluated. The MCMR has the potential for significantly higher hydrogen production per reactor volume and per mass of catalyst compared with other membrane reactor technologies.

    18. In Situ Radio-Frequency Heating for Soil Remediation at a Former Service Station: Case Study and General Aspects (pages 1534–1544)

      G. Huon, T. Simpson, F. Holzer, G. Maini, F. Will, F.-D. Kopinke and U. Roland

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200027

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      In situ radio-frequency heating (ISFRH) in combination with soil vapor extraction was successfully applied for remediation of a decom-missioned petrol station. The technical and engineering aspects of the des-cribed demonstration project can be analogously applied at other sites. With respect to energy and total costs, the ISRFH method has a good chance to compete with alternatives.

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