Chemical Engineering & Technology

Cover image for Vol. 37 Issue 4

April, 2014

Volume 37, Issue 4

Pages 559–731

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Communications
    9. Overview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Chem. Eng. Technol. 4/2014

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201490012

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Communications
    9. Overview
    1. Editorial Board Chem. Eng. Technol. 4/2014

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201490013

  3. Overview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Communications
    9. Overview
    1. Overview Contents: Chem. Eng. Technol. 4/2014 (page 559)

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201490014

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Communications
    9. Overview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Contents: Chem. Eng. Technol. 4/2014 (pages 560–566)

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201490015

  5. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Communications
    9. Overview
    1. Highlights: Chem. Eng. Technol. 4/2014 (pages 568–569)

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201490016

  6. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Communications
    9. Overview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Prediction of the Induced Gas Flow Rate from a Self-Inducing Impeller with CFD (pages 571–579)

      Cláudio P. Fonte, Bruno S. Pinho, Vania Santos-Moreau and José Carlos B. Lopes

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300412

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      Compared to other methods promoting gas dispersion, hollow self-inducing impellers are an interesting solution when the recycling gas is costly or hazardous. A methodology for a simpler estimation of the gas flow rate from single-phase computational fluid dynamics simulations is proposed. The suggested hypothesis is valid for lower values of induced gas flow rate by comparison with experimental results.

    2. Synthesis of a Porous Nano-CaO/MgO-Based CO2 Adsorbent (pages 580–586)

      Peiqiang Lan and Sufang Wu

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300709

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nano-CaO/MgO-based adsorbents exhibit excellent durability with high conversion at low calcination temperature in the absence of CO2 and at high temperature in the presence of high CO2 concentrations. MgO prepared from a magnesium sol serves as a support for nano-CaO to improve the microstructure, sorption capacity, and durability of such adsorbents.

    3. Performance and Energy Consumption of Membrane-Distillation Hybrid Systems for Olefin-Paraffin Separation (pages 587–596)

      Sara Pedram, Tahereh Kaghazchi and Maryam Takht Ravanchi

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201200621

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      Membrane/distillation hybrid systems represent an economical alternative separation process compared to the commonly applied energy-intensive cryogenic distillation for separation of light olefin and paraffin. Different process configurations of such a hybrid system are evaluated. Under optimum conditions the energy requirement could be halved.

    4. Mass Transfer in Molybdenum Extraction from Aqueous Solutions Using Nanoporous Membranes (pages 597–604)

      Mehdi Ghadiri and Seyed N. Ashrafizadeh

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300117

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      Non-disperse solvent extraction of molybdenum(VI) from aqueous solutions with PC-88A as extractant and a nanoporous hollow-fiber membrane contactor as extractor is modeled and simulated by computatio-nal fluid dynamics. The proposed simulation method is well-suited to predict the performance of solvent extraction of molybdenum in membrane extractors.

    5. Shutdown Strategy for Flare Minimization at an Olefin Plant (pages 605–610)

      Tao Wei, Xiaofei Hou, Jiatao Yu, Jian Zhang, Ziyuan Wang, Qiang Xu, Jinsong Zhao and Tong Qiu

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300811

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      Flare minimization during olefin plant shutdowns is a challenging issue for olefin industry sustainability. An innovative process retrofit and shutdown strategy for flare minimization with plant-wide dynamic simulation models is introduced. The suggested shutdown strategy allows a substantial reduction of the flare emission compared to historical records.

    6. Preparation and Characterization of C60-Filled Ethyl Cellulose Mixed-Matrix Membranes for Gas Separation of Propylene/Propane (pages 611–619)

      Haixiang Sun, Cheng Ma, Tao Wang, Yanyan Xu, Bingbing Yuan, Peng Li and Ying Kong

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300667

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      Membrane separation technology is considered as a promising alternative approach for mixture separation of olefin and paraffin. Mixed-matrix membranes consisting of ethyl cellulose and C60 are cross-linked via UV irradiation. The effect of C60 content on separation properties of propylene/propane in terms of C60 particle morphology in the membranes is analyzed.

    7. Water-Resistant Poly(vinyl alcohol)-Silica Hybrids through Sol-Gel Processing (pages 620–626)

      Tahira Pirzada and Syed Sakhawat Shah

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300295

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      The properties of polymer-silica hybrids can be tailored for use in catalysis, adsorption, pervaporation, and sensors. Water resistant polymer-silica hybrids are synthesized by crosslinking poly(vinyl alcohol) with thermally stable silica. The effect of varying ratios of the precursor mixture on the surface structure, thermal properties, crystallinity, and solubility of the hybrids was investigated.

    8. Influence of Thermodynamic, Material, and Bulk Properties on Electrical Resistivity of Particle Layers (pages 627–634)

      Damian Pieloth, Helmut Wiggers and Peter Walzel

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201400012

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      The dust resistivity of SiO2 and Al2O3 particle layers shows non-ohmic and transient behavior and depends also on the dust layer thickness, confirming electret performance. Thermal processes are overlapped by electric processes. In measuring dust resistivity, the balancing periods and treatment history should be considered to avoid misinterpretation of the results.

    9. Absorption of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas using Blended Amine Solutions (pages 635–642)

      Bohong Zhu, Qingcai Liu, Qiang Zhou, Jian Yang, Jian Ding and Juan Wen

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300240

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      With the increasing consummation of natural carbon resources and higher CO2 emissions, CO2 removal is a key research topic. Studies show that the absorption of carbon dioxide from flue gas by blended amine solution has great potential for industrial environmental protection. This work investigates the optimal formula of blended amine solution based on absorption amount, rate, and loading.

    10. Coupled Continuous Chromatography and Racemization Processes for the Production of Pure Enantiomers (pages 643–651)

      Subramanian Swernath, Malte Kaspereit and Achim Kienle

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300597

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      Dynamics and control are studied for a continuous process combining simulated moving-bed chromatography with a racemization reaction in a recycle. This powerful concept can increase the yield from 50 to 100 % for enantiomers produced from racemates. Simple control strategies are proposed that stabilize the process by compensating disturbances under different conditions.

    11. Impact of Surfactant Chemistry on Bubble Column Systems (pages 652–658)

      Dale D. McClure, Julien Deligny, John M. Kavanagh, David F. Fletcher and Geoffrey W. Barton

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300711

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Experimental studies on effects of surfactant addition on the overall holdup and bubble size distribution in a bubble column operating at industrially relevant superficial velocities led to the conclusion that the impact of a surfactant could be best accounted for by examining its hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature, as quantified by the octanol/water partition coefficient.

    12. Numerical Simulation of Oil-Water Core Annular Flow in a U-Bend Based on the Eulerian Model (pages 659–666)

      Fan Jiang, Yijun Wang, Jiajie Ou and Conggui Chen

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300809

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Oil-water core annular flow is a promising option to reduce wall friction in pipe flow. The Eulerian model is found suitable for simulation of this kind of flow through U-bends. The results agree well with experimental data and provide suitable operation conditions for designing U-bend pipefitting. The core annular flow clearly is influenced by oil properties.

    13. Sidestream Analysis and Optimization of Full Tower Internal Thermally Coupled Air Separation Columns (pages 667–674)

      Liang Chang and Xinggao Liu

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300488

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An appropriate sidestream is the basis for optimizing yields and purities of products in cryogenic air separation processes. Analyzing the sidestream characteristics of an internal thermal coupled air separation column, the significant impact of the withdrawn position and flow rate of the sidestream on optimization targets could be demonstrated.

    14. Multi-Stage Aqueous Two-Phase Extraction for the Purification of Monoclonal Antibodies (pages 675–682)

      Jan K. Eggersgluess, Michael Richter, Michael Dieterle and Jochen Strube

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300604

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A step-by-step process development for integrating aqueous-two-phase extraction into a continuous downstream concept for the purification of monoclonal antibodies is presented. Using an industrial cell culture as feed material, feasibility studies were conducted in laboratory experiments, followed by multi-stage purification steps in mini-plant mixer-settler batteries and an extraction column.

    15. Unpromoted and Mn-Promoted Cobalt Catalyst Supported on Carbon Nanotubes for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (pages 683–691)

      Amadeus Rose, Johannes Thiessen, Andreas Jess and Daniel Curulla-Ferré

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300766

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The applicability of mathematical models for description of kinetic processes in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is of major importance for prediction of the behavior of a catalyst under varying reaction conditions. Therefore, the chosen rate approaches were evaluated in terms of a general suitability for novel carbon nanotube-based cobalt and manganese-cobalt systems.

    16. Control Parameterization-Based Adaptive Particle Swarm Approach for Solving Chemical Dynamic Optimization Problems (pages 692–702)

      You Zhou and Xinggao Liu

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300474

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Optimal control problems are often encountered in areas such as economics, robotics, aeronautics, and chemical engineering. A unified framework for solving dynamic optimization problems is proposed. Furthermore, an adaptive particle swarm optimization method is introduced and combined with control parameterization to solve chemical dynamic optimization problems more efficiently.

    17. Production of Electricity during Wastewater Treatment Using Fluidized-Bed Microbial Fuel Cells (pages 703–708)

      Xuyun Wang, Xuehai Yue and Qingjie Guo

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300241

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The ability to generate power with bacteria in wastewater makes microbial fuel cells (MFCs) promising alernatives in enhancing wastewater treatment processes. A fluidized-bed MFC is employed to investigate the effects of fluidization parameters on the electrogenesis capacity. Active carbon particles can significantly reduce the start-up time and increase the output voltage of the fuel cell.

    18. Fuzzy Modeling of the Permeate Flux Decline during Microfiltration of Starch Suspensions (pages 709–716)

      Bojana B. Ikonić, Aleksandar A. Takači, Zoltan Z. Zavargo, Zita N. Šereš, Žana V. Šaranović and Predrag M. Ikonić

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300550

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The ability of the fuzzy controller to predict the decline in permeate flux during starch suspension microfiltration, under different operational conditions with respect to time, was studied. Since the operating conditions significantly affected the transient flux behavior, the influence of the transmembrane pressure, the flow rate, and the suspension concentration was discussed.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Communications
    9. Overview
    1. Pressure Drop Models for Gas/Non-Newtonian Power-Law Fluids Flow in Horizontal Pipes (pages 717–722)

      Jing-yu Xu, Meng-chen Gao and Jian Zhang

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300615

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The two-fluid model has a better predictive ability than other empirical correlations concerning the pressure drop of gas/non-Newtonian power-law fluids flow in horizontal pipes. Commonly used models in the literature are evaluated and compared to a newly developed correlation that proved to be sufficient for practical application in industry.

    2. Behavior of Ultrafine versus Superfine Powders in a Binary-Mixture Semi-Batch Circulating Fluidized Bed (pages 723–729)

      Emad A. M. Abdelghany, Mohammad A. Abdelkareem and Ibrahim H. Mahmoud

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201300366

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Whenever ultrafine and superfine powders are handled, fluidization poses a challenge and is poorly understood. The circulation rates of Geldart A/C mixtures in a circulating fluidized bed were studied in the presence of ultrafine and superfine powders. The circulation rates were much lower in the presence of ultrafine powders. The circulation rates increased at higher water contents for the superfines.

  8. Overview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Communications
    9. Overview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Overview Contents: Chemie Ingenieur Technik 4/2014 (page 731)

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201490017

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