Chemical Engineering & Technology

Cover image for Vol. 39 Issue 2

February, 2016

Volume 39, Issue 2

Pages 185–379

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Overview
    1. Cover Chem. Eng. Technol. 2/2016 (page 185)

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201690000

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Overview
    1. Editorial Board Chem. Eng. Technol. 2/2016 (page 186)

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201690001

  3. Overview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Overview
    1. Overview Contents: Chem. Eng. Technol. 2/2016 (page 187)

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201690002

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Overview
    1. Contents: Chem. Eng. Technol. 2/2016 (pages 188–194)

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201690003

  5. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Overview
    1. Highlights: Chem. Eng. Technol. 2/2016 (pages 196–197)

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201690004

  6. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Overview
    1. Relationship between Surface Roughness, Internal Crystal Perfection, and Crystal Growth Rate (pages 199–207)

      Shaun C. Galbraith, Adrian E. Flood, Supagorn Rugmai and Prae Chirawatkul

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500286

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Crystal growth of potassium dihydrogen phosphate was studied in binary and ternary solutions of water and ethanol. Crystals grown at higher supersaturation exhibit more pronounced and more frequent surface irregularities suggesting feedback between surface roughness and growth rate. No significant relationship was detected between internal crystal perfection and growth rate.

    2. Global Reaction Kinetics of CO and CO2 Methanation for Dynamic Process Modeling (pages 208–218)

      Stefan Rönsch, Jakob Köchermann, Jens Schneider and Steffi Matthischke

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500327

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      For dynamic modeling and simulation of methanation processes employing commercial Ni/Al2O3 catalysts, rate equations are selected, adapted, and tested in a dynamic one-dimensional reactor model. The nickel content of the catalysts is determined as an indicator for the choice of a rate equation. This theory is confirmed by own measurements.

    3. Process Design in World 3.0 – Challenges and Strategies to Master the Raw Material Change (pages 219–224)

      Jakob Burger, Eckhard Ströfer and Hans Hasse

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500196

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      Chemical value-added chains (CVAC) have always been strongly dependent on the energy supply chains. A systematic concept for process design is given to address and overcome specific challenges that arise from aspects of the raw material change in the chemical industry. Thereby, the structure of a globally linked but diverse world can be adequately captured.

    4. Xylene Isomerization in the Liquid Phase Using Large-Pore Zeolites (pages 225–232)

      Jonathan C. Gonçalves and Alírio E. Rodrigues

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500219

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Zeolites are used in acid-catalyzed processes in refineries and petrochemical industries all over the world. Here, xylene isomerization in the liquid phase over zeolites with different Si/Al ratios (β- and Mordenite) was studied experimentally. The kinetic model obtained was simulated in a fixed-bed reactor, compared to ZSM-5.

    5. Modeling of a Methanol Synthesis Reactor for Storage of Renewable Energy and Conversion of CO2 – Comparison of Two Kinetic Models (pages 233–245)

      Johannes J. Meyer, Pepe Tan, Andreas Apfelbacher, Robert Daschner and Andreas Hornung

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500084

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Storing renewable energy via methanol synthesis is a promising technology. Such a process with a 2D pseudo-homogeneous fixed-bed reactor was modeled in MATLAB. The simulation was applied on CO2 and H2 synthesis gas. Differences between two common kinetic models from literature, derived from commercial catalysts, are discussed based on simulations with various synthesis gas compositions.

    6. Optimization of a Pilot-Scale Amine Scrubber to Remove SO2: Higher Selectivity and Lower Solvent Consumption (pages 246–254)

      Mojtaba Mirdrikvand, Saeedeh Imani Moqadam, Abdolreza Kharaghani, Behrooz Roozbehani and Naqi Jadidi

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500490

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The development of a selective and regenerative process for absorbing and stripping SO2 is of growing interest. Pilot-scale flue gas desulfurization applying a diamine was performed to absorb SO2 selectively in such a process. Taguchi's design approach was utilized to find the optimum combination of working parameters for the most efficient reduction of SO2 outlet concentration.

    7. Effect of the Mixed Oleophilic Fibrous Coalescer Geometry and the Operating Conditions on Oily Wastewater Separation (pages 255–262)

      Hao Lu, Qiang Yang, Xiao Xu and Hua-Lin Wang

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201400773

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The separation of oil-in-water emulsions through the combination of fibrous beds and corrugated plates was investigated by laboratory and industrial experiments. The effects of the superficial velocity, the bed depth, the inlet oil content, the packing density, and the specific surface area on the separation performance were examined.

    8. Oligomerization of n-Butenes in a Two-Phase Reaction System with Homogeneous Ni/Al-Catalysts (pages 263–270)

      Arno Behr, Zeynep Bayrak, Güner Samli, Dilbar Yildiz, Stefan Peitz and Guido Stochniol

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500317

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      For identification of a stable, recyclable catalyst system with high octene selectivity, the oligomeri-zation of n-butenes in a two-phase catalyst system consisting of a Lewis acidic ionic liquid and a nonpolar phase is described. The catalyst activity depended on several parameters like ionic liquid concentration, Lewis acidity, buffer concentration, and basicity.

    9. Production of Methyl Oleate in Reactive-Separation Systems (pages 271–275)

      María Dolores López-Ramírez, Ulises Miguel García-Ventura, Fabricio Omar Barroso-Muñoz, Juan Gabriel Segovia-Hernández and Salvador Hernández

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500423

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Esterification of oleic acid with methanol taking H2SO4 as catalyst was investigated in a batch reactive-separation system. The results were applied for scaling up the process to an experimental reactive dividing-wall distillation column, where a preliminary experimental study was carried out in order to corroborate the production of methyl oleate.

    10. Polymer-Based Spherical Activated Carbon as Easy-to-Handle Catalyst Support for Hydrogenation Reactions (pages 276–284)

      Heiko Klefer, Macarena Munoz, Antje Modrow, Bertram Böhringer, Peter Wasserscheid and Bastian J. M. Etzold

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500445

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymer-based spherical activated carbon has proved to be an effective catalyst support for liquid-phase hydrogenation reactions. Its surface can be appropriately tuned, allowing the successful immobilization of palladium. More importantly, its recovery and reusability are favored compared to conventional powder activated carbon due to the absence of fines and its easy handling.

    11. Combined Adsorption/Ultrafiltration of Secondary Effluents Using Powdered Zeolites (pages 285–292)

      Yong Chen, Yong Tu, Yonggang Bai, Min Tang, Weijing Liu and Haisuo Wu

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500238

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An effective multilayer matrix containing powdered zeolites was formed on the surface of an ultrafiltration membrane that contributed significantly to enhanced performance of ultrafiltration. The cake layer containing powdered zeolites on the membrane was relatively porous and looser which could improve the permeability and retard the rate of irreversible fouling.

    12. Heterogeneous Catalytic Polymerization of Ethylene in Microtubular Reactor Systems (pages 293–300)

      Meera Mahadevan, Sangyool Lee, Serguei V. Dessiatoun, Michael Ohadi, Ebrahim Al Hajri and Kyu Yong Choi

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500449

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Heterogeneous polymerization of ethylene over a metallocene catalyst supported on nano-silica particles is shown. Stable flow of the catalyst and polymer particles was established in micro-/millitubular reactors. High catalyst activity was achieved with short residence times, demonstrating the feasibility of using a microtubular reactor as a new process tool in solid-forming olefin polymerization.

    13. Pd-Ag/α-Al2O3 Catalyst Deactivation in Acetylene Selective Hydrogenation Process (pages 301–310)

      Maryam Takht Ravanchi, Saeed Sahebdelfar, Maryam Rahimi Fard, Siavash Fadaeerayeni and Peyman Bigdeli

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201400526

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The long-term behavior of the Pd-Ag/α-Al2O3 catalyst in selective hydrogenation of C2H2 to C2H4 can be well determined by a kinetic model based on first order in C2H2 and 0.5th order in H2 for the main reaction and a second-order independent decay law for catalyst deactivation. Coke amounts over catalysts indicated that coke formation was the main cause of catalyst deactivation.

    14. Mathematical Modeling of Coke Formation and Deposition due to Thermal Cracking of Petroleum Fluids (pages 311–321)

      Ali R. Solaimany Nazar, Farhad Banisharifdehkordi and Sareh Ahmadzadeh

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201400528

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An innovative two-dimensional dynamics model is introduced to predict temperature, velocities, and concentrations of propane and naphtha which undergo thermal cracking for both laminar and turbulent flows inside tubes of petrochemical fired heaters. Excellent agreement is stated between the hydrodynamics of this model and experimental data from literature.

    15. Development of a Replaceable Microreactor Coated with a CuZnFe Nanocatalyst for Methanol Steam Reforming (pages 322–330)

      Masoud Mahmoudizadeh, Abdullah Irankhah, Reza Irankhah and Mehran Jafari

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500101

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Methane steam reforming is performed in a splitting-jointing microreformer. Emphasizing flexibility and replacing of an aged microreactor, a configuration with high efficacy and minimum fabrication cost through a recoverable coating procedure and minimum nanocatalyst consumption is proposed. A treated stainless steel as active layer was coated by this highly efficient nanocatalyst.

    16. Restabilization of Acrylic Acid in Isoperibolic Reactors (pages 331–334)

      Christian A. Pfeifer, Artur Vizer and Herbert Vogel

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201400554

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The restabilization of monomers in tanks is necessary to prevent a spontaneous polymerization, a so-called runaway, which in case of acrylic acid cannot only lead to a shut-down and damage of chemical plants, but also cause casualties. The necessary amount to terminate the undesired starting polymerization immediately is investigated in especially developed isoperibolic reactors.

    17. Gasification of Microalgae Using Supercritical Water and the Potential of Effluent Recycling (pages 335–342)

      Sherif Elsayed, Nikolaos Boukis, Dominik Patzelt, Stefan Hindersin, Martin Kerner and Jörg Sauer

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500146

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gasification of biomass in supercritical water exemplifies the use of renewable sources such as microalgae for energy production. Algal biomass is gasified without drying, yielding a combustible gas mixture. Integration of the cultivation and gasification processes can be carried out by circulating the by-products from gasification to apply them in microalgae cultivation for biomass production.

    18. Continuous Gas Dehydration Using the Hygroscopic Ionic Liquid [EMIM][MeSO3] as a Promising Alternative Absorbent (pages 343–353)

      Michel Krannich, Florian Heym and Andreas Jess

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500588

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The hygroscopic ionic liquid (IL) [EMIM][MeSO3] can be an alternative drying agent to the absorbent triethylene glycol (TEG) commonly used in industrial processes. The disadvantages of TEG can be avoided with this IL. The drying capacity of the IL system is about two times higher compared to TEG. A simple plant design comparable to that of an industrial adsorption plant is possible.

    19. Production Rate-Dependent Key Performance Indicators for a Systematic Design of Biochemical Downstream Processes (pages 354–364)

      Katrin Brandt and Gerhard Schembecker

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500428

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The separation performance indicator is introduced for the first time as key performance indicator for bioprocess development. It combines product yield, purity performance, variable manufacturing costs, and production rate to one objective. Thereby, misguided trade-offs between the four individual measures can be replaced by a systematic and objective rating.

    20. Combined Experimental and Predictive Uncertainty of Quantitative Structure Property Relationship Models (pages 365–370)

      Karsten Müller

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201500606

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The accuracy of prediction models for substance properties is determined by the deviation of the predicted value from the experimental value and the uncertainty of the underlying experimental data itself. The contribution of the latter part should not be neclected. A metric to access this combined uncertainty is proposed which is able to describe the effects of experimental errors.

    21. Mercury Removal by Adsorption on Pectin Extracted from Sugar Beet Pulp: Optimization by Response Surface Methodology (pages 371–377)

      Xinfang Ma, Deqiang Li, Zhansheng Wu, Haiyan Zhang, Xiaoxuan Chen and Zhiyong Liu

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201400059

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Adsorption is one of the most efficient technologies in purification and decontamination. Pectin extracted from sugar beet pulp was tested as a nontoxic, inexpensive, and efficient adsorbent to remove mercury from effluent water. The extraction process was optimized by response surface methodology in order to achieve maximum adsorption capacity.

  7. Overview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Overview
    5. Contents
    6. Highlights
    7. Research Articles
    8. Overview
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