ChemElectroChem

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 1

January 3, 2014

Volume 1, Issue 1

Pages 1–296

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
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    3. Cover Profile
    4. Cover Picture
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Editorial
    7. Masthead
    8. Editor's Selection
    9. News
    10. Minireviews
    11. Communications
    12. Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Fourier-Transformed Large-Amplitude AC Voltammetric Study of Tetrathiafulvalene (TTF): Electrode Kinetics of the TTF0/TTF.+ and TTF.+/TTF2+ Processes (ChemElectroChem 1/2014) (page 1)

      Prof. Alan M. Bond, Kiran Bano, Shaimaa Adeel, Prof. Lisandra L. Martin and Dr. Jie Zhang

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201490000

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      Fourier-transformed large-amplitude AC voltammetry (FTACV) as utilized by A. M. Bond, J. Zhang et al. on p. 99 provides a powerful tool for quantitative electrode kinetic studies. In this context, the method has exceedingly high sensitivity compared to DC voltammetry and conventional small-amplitude AC voltammetry and all data needed are derived from a single experiment. In FTACV, a large-amplitude AC perturbation is superimposed onto the DC ramp. The total current response is then resolved into DC and AC harmonic components using the FT/inverse-FT protocols. Kinetic and mechanistic information can be obtained conveniently from the background-free higher harmonic components present when a large-amplitude AC perturbation is employed. Valuable information is also derived from the DC and fundamental harmonic component. The cover picture demonstrates the application of FTACV for the measurements of the kinetics of fast electron transfer processes associated with tetrathiafulvalene.

  2. Cover Profile

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      Fourier-Transformed Large-Amplitude AC Voltammetric Study of Tetrathiafulvalene (TTF): Electrode Kinetics of the TTF0/TTF.+ and TTF.+/TTF2+ Processes (page 2)

      Prof. Alan M. Bond, Kiran Bano, Shaimaa Adeel, Prof. Lisandra L. Martin and Dr. Jie Zhang

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300245

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      “Exceedingly high sensitivity provided by the higher harmonic components allows fast electrode kinetics…” This and more about the story behind the front cover research can be found at 10.1002/celc.201300245. View the front cover at 10.1002/celc.201300246.

  3. Cover Picture

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      Back Cover: SnO2@TiO2 Heterojunction Nanostructures for Lithium-Ion Batteries and Self-Powered UV Photodetectors with Improved Performances (ChemElectroChem 1/2014) (page 300)

      Xiaojuan Hou, Xianfu Wang, Bin Liu, Qiufan Wang, Zhuoran Wang, Prof. Di Chen and Prof. Guozhen Shen

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201490005

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      The image shows SnO2@TiO2 heterostructures with woven structures on carbon cloth, which were used to fabricate flexible batteries as well as self-powered photodetectors, as shown on p. 108 by D. Chen, G. Shen et al.

  4. Graphical Abstract

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  5. Editorial

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      Powering Up Electrochemistry (pages 4–5)

      Greta Heydenrych and Kira Welter

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300001

  6. Masthead

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    1. Masthead: ChemElectroChem 1/2014 (page 17)

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201490001

  7. Editor's Selection

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  8. News

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  9. Minireviews

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    1. Redox-Based Resistive Switching Memories (ReRAMs): Electrochemical Systems at the Atomic Scale (pages 26–36)

      Dr. Ilia Valov

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300165

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      Atomically scaled memories: Redox-based resistive switching memories (ReRAMs) are nanoscaled solid-state electrochemical systems with a great potential for applications in the future nanoelectronics and information technology. The role of the electrified interfaces is highlighted and the electrode kinetics is discussed, relating them to the more fundamental issue of microscopic description of electrochemical processes at the atomic level.

    2. The Effect of Substrates at Cathodes in Low-temperature Fuel Cells (pages 37–46)

      Dr. Jiwei Ma, Dr. Aurélien Habrioux and Prof. Nicolas Alonso-Vante

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300105

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      The electrocatalytic activity of platinum-based nanoclusters is affected by their interaction (hybridization) with the support. Ways that lead to a strong interaction with the substrates (carbon-based and oxide-based materials) are discussed.

  10. Communications

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    12. Articles
    1. Role of the Lithium Salt in the Performance of Lithium–Oxygen Batteries: A Comparative Study (pages 47–50)

      Giuseppe Antonio Elia, Jin-Bum Park, Prof. Yang-Kook Sun, Prof. Bruno Scrosati and Dr. Jusef Hassoun

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300160

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      Pick the air electrolyte: The choice of the electrolyte salt is crucial for determining the interphase and the polarization of high-performance lithium–air batteries.

    2. Monitoring Amyloid Sup35NM Growth with Label-Free Electrical Detection Using a Field-Effect Transistor Biosensor (pages 51–54)

      Dr. Sho Hideshima, Shofarul Wustoni, Dr. Shigeki Kuroiwa, Dr. Takuya Nakanishi, Prof. Dr. Ayumi Koike-Takeshita and Prof. Dr. Tetsuya Osaka

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300151

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      Semiconductor biosensing: An electrical assay based on the field-effect transistor (FET) is developed for the detection of fibrous amyloid proteins without any labels. This assay distinguishes amyloid proteins possessing the cross-β structure, and thereby monitors amyloid growth.

    3. The Role of PtOH on H2O2 Interactions with Platinum Surfaces in an Electrochemical Environment (pages 55–58)

      Dr. Elton Sitta and Prof. Juan M. Feliu

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300146

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      Judge a book by its cover: By means of well-ordered Pt single crystals it is shown that H2O2 can be reduced on either water-covered or OH-covered Pt(111) surfaces, likely by the same mechanism. On the other hand, the oxidation process is changed when OH-covered surfaces are replaced by O-covered ones.

    4. Oxygen Reduction at Soft Interfaces Catalyzed by In Situ-Generated Reduced Graphene Oxide (pages 59–63)

      Dr. Shokoufeh Rastgar, Haiqiang Deng, Dr. Fernando Cortés-Salazar, Dr. Micheál D. Scanlon, Medeya Pribil, Véronique Amstutz, Prof. Arkady A. Karyakin, Prof. Saeed Shahrokhian and Prof. Hubert H. Girault

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300140

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      Face to face: Flakes of reduced graphene oxide, synthesized in situ at the liquid/liquid interface from a graphene-oxide precursor, are capable of catalyzing the biphasic reduction of protons to hydrogen peroxide in the presence of molecular oxygen and an organic solubilized electron donor. This offers a new perspective for the bulk production of a green oxidant through biphasic electrolysis.

    5. Templating Using Self-Aligned TiO2 Nanotube Stumps: Highly Ordered Metal and Polymer Bumped Arrays (pages 64–66)

      JeongEun Yoo, Dr. Kiyoung Lee and Prof. Dr. Patrik Schmuki

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300133

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      Moth-eye structures: Highly self-ordered TiO2 nanotube stump (TiNTS) layers anodically grown in a HF/H3PO4 electrolyte are presented. The resulting low-aspect-ratio tubes can easily be conformally filled by vacuum-sputter deposition or by melt-casting. Removing the TiO2 nanotube template results in highly ordered “bumped” metal arrays that are promising for applications, such as for “moth-eye” anti-reflection layers.

    6. Climbing the Activity Volcano: Core–Shell Ru@Pt Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction (pages 67–71)

      Ariel Jackson, Venkatasubramanian Viswanathan, Dr. Arnold J. Forman, Dr. Ask H. Larsen, Prof. Jens K. Nørskov and Prof. Thomas F. Jaramillo

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300117

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      Over-weaken, then under-coordinate: A strategy is outlined to develop active electrocatalysts by tuning binding energies using core–shell interactions and nanoscale undercoordination. This is illustrated using density functional theory calculations to guide the design and synthesis of Ru@Pt core–shell catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Electrochemical testing demonstrates their high specific activity.

    7. DNA-Promoted Ultrasmall Palladium Nanocrystals on Carbon Nanotubes: Towards Efficient Formic Acid Oxidation (pages 72–75)

      Lian Ying Zhang, Dr. Chun Xian Guo, Dr. Hongchang Pang, Dr. Weihua Hu, Yan Qiao and Prof. Chang Ming Li

      Version of Record online: 10 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300095

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      Electrode gene pool: A Pd–DNA@CNTs electrocatalyst is fabricated by immobilizing DNA on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to facilitate the growth of uniformly distributed ultrasmall Pd nanocrystals with good crystalline structure. In comparison to Pd–CNTs and commercial Pd/C, the Pd–DNA@CNTs electrode exhibits higher electrocatalytic activity, lower charge-transfer resistance, and improved stability towards formic acid oxidation, providing great a promising anode catalyst for direct formic acid fuel cells.

    8. Exploiting the Facile Oxidation of Evaporated Gold Films to Drive Electroless Silver Deposition for the Creation of Bimetallic Au/Ag Surfaces (pages 76–82)

      Blake J. Plowman, Dr. Matthew R. Field, Prof. Suresh K. Bhargava and Dr. Anthony P. O'Mullane

      Version of Record online: 10 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300079

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      The golden road: The facile synthesis of gold-silver bimetallic surfaces was investigated through the spontaneous decoration of silver on evaporated gold films. This spontaneous reaction was found to be driven by the oxidation of the gold surfaces at potentials lower than that expected for bulk gold, providing a simple method of metal decoration to create bimetallic surfaces.

    9. Highly Disordered Carbon as a Superior Anode Material for Room-Temperature Sodium-Ion Batteries (pages 83–86)

      Dr. Xiaosi Zhou and Prof. Yu-Guo Guo

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300071

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      Organized chaos: A highly disordered carbon composite is synthesized through self-assembly and subsequent pyrolysis. When evaluated as an anode material for room-temperature sodium-ion batteries, the as-obtained carbon delivers superior electrochemical characteristics in terms of reversible capacity, cycling performance, and rate capability.

    10. The Surface Energy of Single Nanoparticles Probed via Anodic Stripping Voltammetry (pages 87–89)

      Christopher C. M. Neumann, Dr. Christopher Batchelor-McAuley, Dr. Kristina Tschulik, Her Shuang Toh, Dr. Poslet Shumbula, Dr. Jeseelan Pillay, Dr. Robert Tshikhudo and Prof. Richard G. Compton

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300062

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      Nanoparticles show properties, which are qualitatively and quantitatively different from those seen at the macro- and micro-scales. One very important but underexplored area relates to the surface energy of the nanoparticles, which increasingly dominates the nanoparticle thermodynamics as the particle size shrinks. The authors show that careful but simple electrochemical measurements can be used, for the first time, to probe the surface energies of nanoparticles.

    11. Realization of an Artificial Three-Phase Reaction Zone in a Li–Air Battery (pages 90–94)

      Moran Balaish, Dr. Alexander Kraytsberg and Prof. Yair Ein-Eli

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300055

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      Low O2 availability at the cathode in Li–air cells (A) is considered to be the major reason for their low practical capacity and power performance. Common organic electrolytes (blue) preclude the existence of a three-phase gas/electrolyte/catalyst interface (B). Moreover, O2 solubility is low in most organic electrolytes. To tackle these problems, an artificial three-phase reaction zone (C) is created by implementing special oxygen carriers (perfluorocarbons, yellow) into the cathodic active sites.

    12. Lighting Up Redox Propulsion with Luminol Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence (pages 95–98)

      Laurent Bouffier, Dodzi Zigah, Catherine Adam, Milica Sentic, Zahra Fattah, Dragan Manojlovic, Prof. Alexander Kuhn and Prof. Neso Sojic

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300042

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      Particle self-tracking: A blue-light-emitting swimmer driven by bipolar electrochemistry is reported here for the first time. The approach involves the controlled motion of a conducting carbon bead through localized oxygen bubble generation, resulting from the oxidation of hydrogen peroxide. Simultaneous oxidation of luminol leads to the emission of light through electrogenerated chemiluminescence.

  11. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Cover Picture
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Editorial
    7. Masthead
    8. Editor's Selection
    9. News
    10. Minireviews
    11. Communications
    12. Articles
    1. Fourier-Transformed Large-Amplitude AC Voltammetric Study of Tetrathiafulvalene (TTF): Electrode Kinetics of the TTF0/TTF.+ and TTF.+/TTF2+ Processes (pages 99–107)

      Prof. Alan M. Bond, Kiran Bano, Shaimaa Adeel, Prof. Lisandra L. Martin and Dr. Jie Zhang

      Version of Record online: 6 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300129

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      At the limit: Fourier-transformed large-amplitude AC voltammetry at a macro disk electrode is used to determine the electrode kinetics of the tetrathiafulvalene (TTF), TTF.+ and TTF2+ processes.

    2. SnO2@TiO2 Heterojunction Nanostructures for Lithium-Ion Batteries and Self-Powered UV Photodetectors with Improved Performances (pages 108–115)

      Xiaojuan Hou, Xianfu Wang, Bin Liu, Qiufan Wang, Zhuoran Wang, Prof. Di Chen and Prof. Guozhen Shen

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300053

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      An effective strategy is explored to prepare a hybrid material, which consists of rutile SnO2 nanoparticles and rutile TiO2 nanorods and can be effectively used in lithium-ion batteries and self-powered UV photodetectors.

    3. Electrochemical Conversion of Dichloroacetic Acid to Chloroacetic Acid in Conventional Cell and in Two Microfluidic Reactors (pages 116–124)

      Prof. Dr. Onofrio Scialdone, Prof. Dr. Alessandro Galia, Dr. Simona Sabatino, Giovanni Marco Vaiana, Dr. Diego Agro, Prof. Dr. Alessandro Busacca and Prof. Dr. Christian Amatore

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300216

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      Two microreactors for electrochemical synthesis of chloroacetic acid: The electrochemical conversion of dichloroacetic acid to chloroacetic acid is successfully carried out in two different microreactors with high conversions and selectivity under a single-pass mode without supporting electrolyte at low cell voltages.

    4. High-Performance Hybrid Supercapacitor Based on Graphene-Wrapped Li4Ti5O12 and Activated Carbon (pages 125–130)

      Haegyeom Kim, Kyu-Young Park, Min-Young Cho, Mok-Hwa Kim, Jihyun Hong, Sung-Kyun Jung, Dr. Kwang Chul Roh and Prof. Kisuk Kang

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300186

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      Hybrid hatchbacks: A hybrid supercapacitor based on a graphene-wrapped Li4Ti5O12 anode and an activated carbon cathode delivers a high energy of approximately 50 Wh kg−1. This novel supercapacitor can maintain around 15 Wh kg−1 at a 20 s charge/discharge rate, satisfying the requirements for use in hybrid electric vehicles.

    5. Photoelectrochemical Communication between Thylakoid Membranes and Gold Electrodes through Different Quinone Derivatives (pages 131–139)

      Kamrul Hasan, Prof. Yusuf Dilgin, Dr. Sinan Cem Emek, Mojtaba Tavahodi, Prof. Hans-Erik Åkerlund, Prof. Per-Åke Albertsson and Prof. Lo Gorton

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300148

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      Intercom: Thylakoid membranes are photoelectrochemically wired to AuNP–Au electrodes in the presence of a range of quinone derivatives in solution. Photocurrent generation is shown to depend on the chemical structure and redox potential of the quinone derivative used. para-Benzoquinone, which has the simplest structure and the highest redox potential, is found to be the best soluble electron mediator that generates the maximum photocurrent.

    6. Micropipette Contact Technique as a Tool to Reveal, Characterize, and Modify Nanopore Electrodes (pages 140–146)

      Dr. Dario Battistel, Giulia Pecchielan and Prof. Salvatore Daniele

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300147

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      Nanopores are generated during deposition of thin alumina films on to platinum substrates. The micropipette contact method allows revealing and characterising single submicrometer-sized pores randomly distributed across the alumina surface. The size of single nanopores can be determined by voltammetry. Moreover, each pore can be filled with metallic silver, thus obtaining silver spots as large as the corresponding pore size.

    7. Optimization of the Probe Coverage in DNA Biosensors by a One-Step Coadsorption Procedure (pages 147–157)

      Dr. Thomas Doneux, Dr. Aurore De Rache, Eléonore Triffaux, Dr. Anne Meunier, Dr. Marc Steichen and Prof. Claudine Buess-Herman

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300145

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      It's a cover up! The analytical performance of DNA-based biosensors can be easily optimized by adjusting the probe surface coverage through the ionic strength in a one-step coadsorption procedure.

    8. Lithium Insertion/Deinsertion Characteristics of Nanostructured Amorphous Tantalum Oxide Thin Films (pages 158–164)

      Hoang X. Dang, Yong-Mao Lin, Kyle C. Klavetter, Trevor H. Cell, Prof. Adam Heller and Prof. C. Buddie Mullins

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300139

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      Nanosize matters: Nanostructured Ta2O5 thin films show high volumetric capacity at high Coulombic rates, and outperform a dense film of the same mass loading. The highly porous surface helps alleviate volume-change associated stresses and enables rapid Li solid-state diffusion, which was found to be the limiting step during lithium insertion/deinsertion for the dense film Ta2O5 anode.

    9. The Effect of Interfacial Design on the Electrochemical Detection of DNA and MicroRNA Using Methylene Blue at Low-Density DNA Films (pages 165–171)

      Roya Tavallaie, Dr. Nadim Darwish, Dr. Magdalena Gebala, Prof. D. Brynn Hibbert and Prof. J. Justin Gooding

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300136

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      Two mechanisms and one response: On low-density DNA films the electrochemical responses from methylene blue after hybridization is dependent on the orientation of the duplex (see picture). Decreasing the ability of duplex to bend toward the surface results in improving single base pair mismatch discrimination.

    10. Promotion Effects of Sn on the Electrocatalytic Reduction of Nitrate at Rh Nanoparticles (pages 172–179)

      Dr. W. Siriwatcharapiboon, Dr. Y. Kwon, Dr. J. Yang, Dr. R. L. Chantry, Dr. Z. Li, Dr. S. L. Horswell and Prof. Dr. M. T. M. Koper

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300135

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      Rh nanoparticles on a carbon support are prepared for electrochemical nitrate reduction. Online electrochemical mass spectrometry and ion chromatography are applied to analyze volatile and ionic products during the reaction. Sn modification of Rh changes both the activity and selectivity of the reaction, similar to the effects of Sn modification on Pt.

    11. Scanning Photoelectron Microscopy Study of the Pt/Phosphoric-Acid-Imbibed Membrane Interface under Polarization (pages 180–186)

      Dr. Won H. Doh, Dr. Luca Gregoratti, Dr. Matteo Amati, Dr. Spyridon Zafeiratos, Dr. Yeuk T. Law, Prof. Stylianos G. Neophytides, Alin Orfanidi, Dr. Maya Kiskinova and Prof. Elena R. Savinova

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300134

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      Current affairs: A model membrane-electrode assembly of a high-temperature polymer-exchange membrane fuel cell based on a phosphoric-acid-imbibed membrane is studied under polarization by using scanning photoelectron microscopy and spectroscopy, which reveals the Pt-catalyzed reduction of phosphoric acid to phosphorous acid and elemental phosphorus (see picture).

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      The Electrodeposition of Silver from Supercritical Carbon Dioxide/Acetonitrile (pages 187–194)

      Prof. Philip N. Bartlett, Dr. Magdalena Perdjon-Abel, Dr. David Cook, Prof. Gillian Reid, Prof. William Levason, Dr. Fei Cheng, Dr. Wenjian Zhang, Prof. Michael W. George, Dr. Jie Ke, Dr. Richard Beanland and Dr. Jeremy Sloan

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300131

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      Templates with a silver lining: Five silver complexes are investigated for the electrodeposition of silver from supercritical CO2/CH3CN. The best choice is found to be [Ag(CH3CN)4]+, which is shown to give good bulk silver deposits on macroelectrodes and 13 nm silver nanowires in the pores of an anodic alumina membrane.

    13. PM-IRRA Spectroelectrochemistry of Hexacyanoferrate Films in Layer-by-Layer Polyelectrolyte Multilayers (pages 195–199)

      Matías Villalba, Dr. Lucila P. Méndez De Leo and Prof. Ernesto J. Calvo

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300120

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      Redox-active layers: In situ polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) investigations carried out under potential control show that different populations of Fe(CN)63/4− anions exchange with the polyions of a layer-by-layer self-assembled polyelectrolyte multilayer. The system is sensitive to redox switching.

    14. Biotin-Labeled Electropolymerized Network of Gold Nanoparticles for Amperometric Immunodetection of Human Fibrinogen (pages 200–206)

      Paula Díez, Dr. María Gamella, Prof. Paloma Martínez-Ruíz, Valentina Lanzone, Dr. Alfredo Sánchez, Enrique Sánchez, Belit Garcinuño, Dr. Reynaldo Villalonga and Prof. José M. Pingarrón

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300114

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      Golden globes: A sensitive amperometric immunosensor for human fibrinogen is prepared by using a novel 3D matrix of electropolymerized biotin-labeled gold nanoparticles as scaffold for the affinity-based assembly of the electrode.

    15. Topologically Sensitive Surface Segregations of Au–Pd Alloys in Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution (pages 207–212)

      Dr. Maki Okube, Dr. Valery Petrykin, Dr. Jonathan E. Mueller, Donato Fantauzzi, Dr. Petr Krtil and Prof. Timo Jacob

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300112

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      A dynamic catalyst: DFT-based calculations along with in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy data show that AuPd alloys form unique potential-controlled surface structures during hydrogen adsorption/evolution. Surface segregations take place, with a preference for a gold surface if the surface is free of chemisorbed species, while hydrogen adsorption triggers palladium segregation into the surface.

    16. Position of Cu Atoms at the Pt(111) Electrode Surfaces Controls Electrosorption of (H)SO4(2)− from H2SO4 Electrolytes (pages 213–219)

      Jakub Tymoczko, Prof. Wolfgang Schuhmann and Dr. Aliaksandr S. Bandarenka

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300107

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      Strategic placement: Changing the relative position of Cu atoms located at the surface of Pt(111) electrodes allows the control of the electrosorption properties of the surface.

    17. Silicon-Rich Carbon Hybrid Nanofibers from Water-Based Spinning: The Synergy Between Silicon and Carbon for Li-ion Battery Anode Application (pages 220–226)

      Dr. Yong Seok Kim, Dr. Kyung Woo Kim, Dr. Daehwan Cho, Dr. Nathaniel S. Hansen, Prof. Jinwoo Lee and Prof. Yong Lak Joo

      Version of Record online: 5 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300103

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      Spinning top: Silicon-rich carbon nanofibers produced through water-based spinning exhibit high energy capacity and good cycle ability in the Li-ion battery anode application. They maintain a high surface area, accommodate severe volume changes within the carbon backbone, avoid the formation of unstable solid-electrolyte interface layers on the surface of silicon, and ensure high electrical or electronic conductivity.

    18. Uncovering the Missing Link between Molecular Electrochemistry and Electrocatalysis: Mechanism of the Reduction of Benzyl Chloride at Silver Cathodes (pages 227–240)

      Dr. Oleksiy V. Klymenko, Dr. Olivier Buriez, Prof. Dr. Eric Labbé, Prof. Dr. Dong-Ping Zhan, Prof. Dr. Sandra Rondinini, Prof. Dr. Zhong-Qun Tian, Prof. Dr. Irina Svir and Prof. Dr. Christian Amatore

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300101

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      Hidden universe between two worlds: The reduction of PhCH2Cl provides the first example of the missing link between molecular electrochemistry and electrocatalysis. This link is established from an investigation of the reaction mechanism over a wide range of experimental timescales and by comparison to theoretical voltammetric predictions by using KISSA-1D software.

    19. Improved Interfacial Electron Transfer in Modified Bilirubin Oxidase Biocathodes (pages 241–248)

      Ryan J. Lopez, Dr. Sofia Babanova, Yevgenia Ulyanova, Sameer Singhal and Dr. Plamen Atanassov

      Version of Record online: 6 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300085

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      Current improvement: Polymer-coated multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are modified with 1-pyrenebutanoic acid, succinimidyl ester, a cross-linker, and by using the bilirubin oxidase (BOx) natural substrate (bilirubin) or its artificial analogues as orientating agent, which provide stable immobilization and efficient orientation of the bilirubin oxidase enzyme. Subsequently, an increase in the electrocatalytic activity of BOx biocathodes is observed.

    20. Simultaneous Direct Voltammetric Determination of Metal-Oxide Nanoparticles from Their Mixture (CuO/NiO) (pages 249–253)

      Wei Zhe Teo and Prof. Martin Pumera

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300008

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      Quite complex: The electrochemical behavior of copper oxide/nickel oxide nanoparticle mixtures (CuO–NiO-NP) in alkaline media is studied to investigate the possibility of simultaneously determining two nanoparticles in a complex system.

    21. Comparative Study of the Electrochemical Promotion of CO2 Hydrogenation over Ru-Supported Catalysts using Electronegative and Electropositive Promoters (pages 254–262)

      Demetrios Theleritis, Marialena Makri, Dr. Stamatios Souentie, Dr. Angel Caravaca, Prof. Alexandros Katsaounis and Prof. Constantinos G. Vayenas

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300185

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      Who′s the boss? A comparison of the electrochemical promotion of CO2 hydrogenation over Ru-catalyst electrodes deposited on β“-Al2O3 (see picture) or YSZ solid-electrolyte pellets, at temperatures between 200 and 340 °C and pressures up to 5 bar, shows that CH4 production is enhanced by applying a positive potential (electronegative promoter supply), whereas negative-potential (electropositive-promoter supply) favors CO formation.

    22. Stepwise Solid-Phase Synthesis and Solid-State Electrochemistry of Redox-Active Viologen Core/Shell-Structured Modified Silica Materials (pages 263–280)

      Monika Passon, Dr. Adrian Ruff, Paul Schuler, Prof. Dr. Bernd Speiser and Dr. Ines Dreiling

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300123

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      Addressable layers: Core/shell-structured redox-active silica particles have been synthesized in a multistep solid-phase reaction. The viologen shell is electrochemically addressable. A first reduction (see picture) yields particles with a diamagnetic core and a paramagnetic shell (viologen radicals). Such materials are of interest for charge storage and/or functional magnetic materials.

    23. The Formation and Role of Oxide Layers on Pt during Hydrazine Oxidation in Protic Ionic Liquids (pages 281–288)

      Dr. Darren A. Walsh, Andinet Ejigu, Sayyar Muhammad and Prof. Peter Licence

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300111

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      Trace water oxidation at Pt in protic ionic liquids results in the formation of oxide layers on the Pt surface. The oxide thickness and growth mechanism depends on the applied potential and temperature. Surface oxides persist on the surface during potential cycling and play a crucial role in activating Pt during hydrazine oxidation.

    24. Diffusion–Recombination Impedance Model for Solar Cells with Disorder and Nonlinear Recombination (pages 289–296)

      Prof. Juan Bisquert, Dr. Iván Mora-Sero and Dr. Francisco Fabregat-Santiago

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300091

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      Diffusing out: The theory of diffusion–recombination impedance applied to nanostructured solar cells is presented with an emphasis on the effects of energy disorder and short diffusion length.

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