ChemElectroChem

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 4

April 15, 2014

Volume 1, Issue 4

Pages 681–816

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Concepts
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Nitrogen-Doped Carbon–Copper Nanohybrids as Electrocatalysts in H2O2 and Glucose Sensing (ChemElectroChem 4/2014) (page 681)

      Dr. Chengzhen Wei, Dr. Yuanying Liu, Dr. Xinran Li, Dr. Junhong Zhao, Dr. Zhen Ren and Prof. Huan Pang

      Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201400032

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      The front cover artwork was chosen to represent a non-enzymatic amperometric sensor that was based on N-doped nanoporous carbon–copper nanohybrids. The sensor was fabricated and investigated for the detection of H2O2. On p. 799, Prof. H. Pang et al. show how they synthesized N-doped nanoporous carbon–copper nanohybrids based on cis-Cu(gly)2xH2O nanofibers and trans-Cu(gly)2xH2O nanoplates to detect both H2O2 as well as glucose oxidation with high sensitivity, a low detection limit, and excellent selectivity. (DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300211).

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      Inside Cover: Germanium-Based Electrode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries (ChemElectroChem 4/2014) (page 817)

      Dr. Yang Liu, Prof. Sulin Zhang and Prof. Ting Zhu

      Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201400034

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      The inside cover picture shows the atomic-scale lithiation process in a crystalline Ge nanowire electrode, revealed by using an in situ transmission electron microscopy electrochemistry technique; see the Concept paper by Y. Liu, S. Zhang, and T. Zhu on page 706 (DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300195).

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      Back Cover: NbPt3 Intermetallic Nanoparticles: Highly Stable and CO-Tolerant Electrocatalyst for Fuel Oxidation (ChemElectroChem 4/2014) (page 818)

      Dr. Gubbala V. Ramesh, Dr. Rajesh Kodiyath, Dr. Toyokazu Tanabe, Maidhily Manikandan, Prof. Takeshi Fujita, Prof. Futoshi Matsumoto, Dr. Shinsuke Ishihara, Dr. Shigenori Ueda, Dr. Yoshiyuki Yamashita, Prof. Katsuhiko Ariga and Prof. Hideki Abe

      Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201400035

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      The back cover artwork was chosen to show how nanoparticles of an intermetallic compound, NbPt3 (illustrated by an alchemical symbol), efficiently convert chemical energy in alcohol to electricity. NbPt3 nanoparticles catalyze the electro-oxidation of ethanol at a lower onset potential than Pt nanoparticles. More details can be found in the Communication by Abe et al. on page 728 (DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300240).

  2. Cover Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Concepts
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Nitrogen-Doped Carbon–Copper Nanohybrids as Electrocatalysts in H2O2 and Glucose Sensing (page 682)

      Dr. Chengzhen Wei, Dr. Yuanying Liu, Dr. Xinran Li, Dr. Junhong Zhao, Dr. Zhen Ren and Prof. Huan Pang

      Version of Record online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201400033

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      “This Full Paper shows that glycine, the simplest amino acid, can be employed for the synthesis of N-doped nanoporous carbon–copper nanohybrids based on cis-Cu(gly)2xH2O nanofibers and trans-Cu(gly)2xH2O nanoplates. A non-enzymatic amperometric sensor based on the N-doped nanoporous carbon–copper nanohybrids is fabricated and investigated for the detection of H2O2 and for glucose oxidation….” This and more about the story behind the front cover research can be found at 10.1002/celc.201300211. View the front cover at 10.1002/celc.201400032.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Concepts
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Concepts
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
  5. News

    1. Top of page
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    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Concepts
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
  6. Concepts

    1. Top of page
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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Concepts
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    1. Logic Functions with Stimuli-Responsive Single Nanopores (pages 698–705)

      Prof. Dr. Patricio Ramirez, Dr. Javier Cervera, Dr. Mubarak Ali, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Ensinger and Prof. Dr. Salvador Mafe

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300255

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      Porefection: Electrochemical transducers based on single stimuli-responsive polymeric nanopores can support a complete set of logic functions. Thermal, chemical, electrical, and optical stimuli are the input signals required to externally tune the pore conductance (i.e. the logical output).

    2. Germanium-Based Electrode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries (pages 706–713)

      Dr. Yang Liu, Prof. Sulin Zhang and Prof. Ting Zhu

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300195

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      In situ TEM electrochemistry is a powerful tool to study lithiation/delithiation and degradation mechanisms in battery electrodes in real time with high spatial resolution. Novel phenomena are uncovered in germanium-based electrode materials by using this technique.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Concepts
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    1. Organic Nanoparticles: Mechanism of Electron Transfer to Indigo Nanoparticles (pages 714–717)

      Dr. Wei Cheng, Dr. Christopher Batchelor-McAuley and Prof. Richard G. Compton

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300233

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      Deep impact: The authors report the kinetics and mechanism of electron transfer to individual organic nanoparticles, using indigo nanoparticles as a model system, via analysis of the charge transferred in the reduction of individual organic nanoparticles.

    2. Influence of Ionic Liquid Selection on the Properties of Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Diacrylate-Supported Ionogels as Solid Electrolytes (pages 718–721)

      Adam F. Visentin, Stephanie Alimena and Prof. Matthew J. Panzer

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300205

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      Identity crisis? Three ionic liquids, differing only in their anions, are incorporated into cross-linked, polymer-supported ionogel electrolytes. Ionic-liquid identity influences the minimum amount of polymer required to create a gel, but not the value of the Young's modulus or the relative loss in ionic conductivity for a given polymer weight fraction above the gelation point.

    3. Electrochemical- and Fluorescent-Mediated Signal Amplifications for Rapid Detection of Low-Abundance Circulating Tumor Cells on a Paper-Based Microfluidic Immunodevice (pages 722–727)

      Dr. Yafeng Wu, Peng Xue, Prof. Kam M. Hui and Prof. Yuejun Kang

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300194

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      Paper diagnosis: A procedure for electrochemical and fluorescent detection of circulating tumor cells using a paper-based microfluidic immunodevice is presented.

    4. NbPt3 Intermetallic Nanoparticles: Highly Stable and CO-Tolerant Electrocatalyst for Fuel Oxidation (pages 728–732)

      Dr. Gubbala V. Ramesh, Dr. Rajesh Kodiyath, Dr. Toyokazu Tanabe, Maidhily Manikandan, Prof. Takeshi Fujita, Prof. Futoshi Matsumoto, Dr. Shinsuke Ishihara, Dr. Shigenori Ueda, Dr. Yoshiyuki Yamashita, Prof. Katsuhiko Ariga and Prof. Hideki Abe

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300240

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      Tall order: Atomically ordered NbPt3 intermetallic nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized for the first time through a wet-chemistry route. The NbPt3 NPs are stable during repeated electrochemical cycles, have an improved CO-poisoning tolerance, and exhibit enhanced catalytic activity towards fuel oxidation. The improved catalytic performance of the NbPt3 NPs is attributed to the lowering in the d-band center caused by orbital hybridization of the Nb and Pt atoms.

  8. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Concepts
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    1. In Situ Electrochemical Generation of Mesostructured Cu2S/C Composite for Enhanced Lithium Storage: Mechanism and Material Properties (pages 733–740)

      Prof. Fei Han, Prof. Wen-Cui Li, Duo Li and Prof. An-Hui Lu

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300182

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      Keeping an ion it: Dissolved polysulfide ions from sulfur are firmly anchored by the copper ions released from a copper foil for the in situ generation of tubular mesoporous carbon homogeneously encapsulating Cu2S. The resulting Cu2S/C composite is used as the cathode in a lithium-ion battery and exhibits enhanced lithium storage with stable cycle performance and high rate capability.

    2. Mediatorless Immunoassay with Voltage-Controlled Intrinsic Amplification for Ultrasensitive and Rapid Detection of Microorganism Pathogens (pages 741–746)

      Jiapeng Wang, Prof. Yan Xu and Prof. Siu-Tung Yau

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300180

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      Detection of­ E. coli­ in milk: The detection demonstrated a detection limit of 20 CFU mL−1 (where CFU is a colony-forming unit) without performing sample pre-enrichment and centrifugation of sample followed by the resuspension of the pellet in a buffer solution, resulting in a significantly shortened assay time of 67 min.

    3. Morphology Effects on the Supercapacitive Electrochemical Performances of Iron Oxide/Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites (pages 747–754)

      Peng-Cheng Gao, Dr. Patrícia A. Russo, Dr. Donato E. Conte, Seunghwan Baek, Dr. François Moser, Prof. Nicola Pinna, Prof. Thierry Brousse and Dr. Frédéric Favier

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300087

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      Supercharged: The morphological characteristics of iron oxide (FeOx)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanocomposites strongly impact on the supercapacitive behavior of the corresponding electrode material. The influence of the FeOx particle size, RGO surface coverage, and stacking degree are assigned by using an electrochemical study, which also enables the deconvolution of the electrical double-layer capacitance and faradic contributions.

    4. Arrays of Screen-Printed Graphite Microband Electrodes as a Versatile Electroanalysis Platform (pages 755–762)

      Dr. Mikhail Yu. Vagin, Alina N. Sekretaryova, Rafael Sanchez Reategui, Prof. Ingemar Lundstrom, Prof. Fredrik Winquist and Prof. Mats Eriksson

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300204

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      Microband electrode arrays: Arrays of microband electrodes on a plastic support are developed by screen printing followed by cutting. Convergent diffusion, with current densities similar to those of a single microelectrode, is observed, which causes an enhancement in the analytical characteristics relative to those of the macroelectrodes; this is illustrated with detection of ascorbic acid and a mediated glucose oxidase biosensor.

    5. Nonenzymatic Electrochemical Superoxide Sensor (pages 763–771)

      Rita Nissim and Prof. Richard G. Compton

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300209

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      Super sensing: The reaction of superoxide and nitroblue tetrazolium chloride provides a sensitive method for the nonenzymatic detection of superoxide on a carbon paste electrode, which is fabricated from dioctyl phthalate and graphite powder. Values for the practical limit of detection reach nanomolar levels.

    6. Improving the Energy Storage Performance of Graphene through Insertion of Pristine CNTs and Ordered Mesoporous Carbon Coating (pages 772–778)

      Dr. Bo You, Lili Wang, Prof. Na Li and Chaolun Zheng

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300241

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      A facile doubly enhanced strategy for improving the energy storage of graphene is presented. Pristine CNTs are directly dispersed in GO, which is and subsequently coated by ordered mesoporous carbon.

    7. Electrochemical Genotyping of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms by using Monobase-Conjugated Modified Nanoparticles (pages 779–786)

      Seyyed Mehdi khoshfetrat and Dr. Masoud A. Mehrgardi

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300221

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      Rules of engagement: A new approach for electrochemical genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is reported. Silver and gold nanoparticle probes, based on DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment), induce coupling of the nucleotide-modified nanoparticle probe to the mutant sites of duplex DNA, according to the Watson–Crick base-pairing rule.

    8. Nanoscale Structuring in Au–Ni Films Grown by Electrochemical Underpotential Co-deposition (pages 787–792)

      Dr. Defu Liang, Dr. Parasmani Rajput, Dr. Jorg Zegenhagen and Prof. Giovanni Zangari

      Version of Record online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300214

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      Alloy Alloy: Au–Ni alloys are electrochemically deposited at underpotential conditions for Ni, in contrast with bulk alloy thermodynamics. Underpotential deposition is made possible by the attractive interactions between Au and Ni atoms. Phase separation at the nanometer scale results from a balance between attractive Au–Ni interactions and strain energy that originates from atomic volume mismatch.

    9. Phenothiazine-Capped Gold Nanoparticles: Photochemically Assisted Synthesis and Application in Electrosensing of Phosphate Ions (pages 793–798)

      Sandeep Gupta, Dr. Akhilesh K. Singh, Ravish K. Jain, Dr. Ramesh Chandra and Prof. Dr. Rajiv Prakash

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300212

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      Top hat: Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), formed through a photochemically assisted process by using phenothiazine (PTZH), stablize themselves through electrostatic interactions with sulfur and nitrogen atoms. This hybrid electrode material can be used to modify electrodes for electrochemical sensing and catalysis, which can be used for the fabrication of sensing devices. We demonstrate the electrocatalytic activity of AuNPs capped with PTZH for the electrochemical sensing of phosphate ions.

    10. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon–Copper Nanohybrids as Electrocatalysts in H2O2 and Glucose Sensing (pages 799–807)

      Dr. Chengzhen Wei, Dr. Yuanying Liu, Dr. Xinran Li, Dr. Junhong Zhao, Dr. Zhen Ren and Prof. Huan Pang

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300211

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      Sense and sensitivity: Nitrogen-doped carbon–copper nanohybrids are prepared through the calcination of Cu(gly)2x H2O in Ar gas. Benefitting from nanoporous structures and high nitrogen content, the porous nitrogen-doped carbon–copper nanohybrids are used to modify electrodes for glucose and H2O2 sensing with a low detection limit, good sensitivity, and excellent selectivity.

    11. Direct Electrochemical Tyrosinase Biosensor based on Mesoporous Carbon and Co3O4 Nanorods for the Rapid Detection of Phenolic Pollutants (pages 808–816)

      Xue Wang, Prof. Xianbo Lu, Dr. Lidong Wu and Prof. Jiping Chen

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300208

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      Tyrosinase biosensor: The graphitized ordered mesoporous carbon/cobaltosic oxide nanorod (GMC/Co3O4) nanocomposite provides a robust, efficient, and universal electrochemical biosensing platform for the fabrication of enzyme biosensors. A novel tyrosinase biosensor based on the GMC/Co3O4 nanocomposite is developed for the rapid detection of phenolic pollutants.

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