ChemElectroChem

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 6

June 11, 2014

Volume 1, Issue 6

Pages 959–1083

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover Picture
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Cover Profile
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. Masthead
    9. News
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Electrocatalytic SiC Nanoparticles/PEDOT:PSS Composite Thin Films as the Counter Electrodes of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (ChemElectroChem 6/2014) (page 959)

      Yu-Lin Tsai, Chun-Ting Li, Tzu-Yen Huang, Chi-Ta Lee, Chen-Yang Lin, Dr. Chih-Wei Chu, Dr.  R. Vittal and Prof. Kuo-Chuan Ho

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201490026

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      The front cover artwork was chosen to show a composite film of silicon carbide nanoparticles and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) as the counter-electrode material for a dye-sensitized solar cell. The optimized composite provides a good overall electrocatalytic ability, a reasonable intrinsic heterogeneous rate constant, a large effective electrocatalytic surface area, and a high cell efficiency. (DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300242).

  2. Inside Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover Picture
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Cover Profile
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. Masthead
    9. News
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Articles
    1. Cover Picture: MnO2 Nanoflower Arrays with High Rate Capability for Flexible Supercapacitors (ChemElectroChem 6/2014 (page 960)

      Dr. Wenyao Li, Kaibing Xu, Bo Li, Jianqing Sun, Feiran Jiang, Prof. Zhishui Yu, Dr. Rujia Zou, Prof. Zhigang Chen and Prof. Junqing Hu

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201490027

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      Hu et al. synthesized large-area α-MnO2 nanoflower arrays on flexible substrates, which produced a high specific capacitance with remarkable rate capability and excellent cycling stability, as shown on p. 1003.

  3. Inside Back Cover

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    8. Masthead
    9. News
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Articles
    1. Cover Picture: Nanoparticle-Impact Experiments are Highly Sensitive to the Presence of Adsorbed Species on Electrode Surfaces (ChemElectroChem 6/2014 (page 1085)

      Enno Kätelhön, Dr. Wei Cheng, Dr. Christopher Batchelor-McAuley, Dr. Kristina Tschulik and Prof.Dr. Richard G. Compton

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201490032

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      A small amount of adsorbed molecules on an electrode surface can fully suppress its direct or mediated electrochemical interaction with impacting nanoparticles, as shown on p. 1057 by R. G. Compton et al.

  4. Back Cover

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    8. Masthead
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    11. Communications
    12. Articles
    1. Back Cover: Effective Separation of Lithium Anode and Sulfur Cathode in Lithium–Sulfur Batteries (ChemElectroChem 6/2014) (page 1086)

      Alen Vizintin, Manu U. M. Patel, Dr. Bostjan Genorio and Dr. Robert Dominko

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201490033

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      Effective separation of a lithium anode and a sulfur cathode is achieved by using a thin layer of functionalized graphene. On p. 1040, R. Dominko et al. show how this gave comparable cycling stability to lithium-conducting ceramics.

  5. Cover Profile

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    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Electrocatalytic SiC Nanoparticles/PEDOT:PSS Composite Thin Films as the Counter Electrodes of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (page 961)

      Yu-Lin Tsai, Chun-Ting Li, Tzu-Yen Huang, Chi-Ta Lee, Chen-Yang Lin, Dr. Chih-Wei Chu, Dr. R. Vittal and Prof. Kuo-Chuan Ho

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201402117

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      “This Full Paper demonstrates a that the composite film can be used as the counter-electrode material for a dye-sensitized solar cell, providing a high overall electrocatalytic ability (0.93 times that of Pt), a reasonable intrinsic heterogeneous rate constant (0.6 times that of Pt), a large effective electrocatalytic surface area (1.6 times that of Pt), and a high cell efficiency (0.91 times that of the cell with Pt)…‥” This and more about the story behind the front cover research can be found at 10.1002/celc.201300242. View the front cover at 10.1002/celc.201402118.

  6. Graphical Abstract

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  7. Masthead

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    12. Articles
    1. Masthead: ChemElectroChem 6/2014 (page 969)

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201490029

  8. News

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  9. Review

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    1. Very Important Paper

      You have free access to this content
      Three-Dimensional Structural Engineering for Energy-Storage Devices: From Microscope to Macroscope (pages 975–1002)

      Jing Xu, Xianfu Wang, Xiaowei Wang, Prof. Di Chen, Prof. Xiaoyuan Chen, Prof. Dongdong Li and Prof. Guozhen Shen

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201400001

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      Full of energy: For high-performance energy-storage devices, three-dimensional (3D) designs with diverse configurations are demonstrated to provide highly qualified electrodes and efficient device integration. From a microscope to a macroscope view, this review summarizes the recent advances in electrochemically active nanomaterials, novel current collectors, and integrations of the devices in 3D configurations.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    8. Masthead
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    11. Communications
    12. Articles
    1. MnO2 Nanoflower Arrays with High Rate Capability for Flexible Supercapacitors (pages 1003–1008)

      Dr. Wenyao Li, Kaibing Xu, Bo Li, Jianqing Sun, Feiran Jiang, Prof. Zhishui Yu, Dr. Rujia Zou, Prof. Zhigang Chen and Prof. Junqing Hu

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201400006

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      Great things in small packages: Large-area α-MnO2 nanoflower arrays on flexible substrates are synthesized through a facial template-free electrochemical deposition process. These nanoflower arrays produce an enhanced electrochemical performance in the form of a high specific capacitance with remarkable rate capability and excellent cycling stability.

    2. Inhibition of Cu Underpotential Deposition on Au Nanoparticles: The Role of the Citrate Capping Agent and Nanoparticle Size (pages 1009–1012)

      Dr. Blake J. Plowman and Prof. Richard G. Compton

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201400015

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      Probing inhibition: Given the importance of nanoparticle-based functional materials, understanding the altered adsorption and reactivity at these surfaces is of great interest. By comparing the underpotential deposition of Cu on a Au macroelectrode and nanoparticle surfaces, the influence of both the capping agent and the nanoparticle size are examined, revealing significant effects on the surface coverage of Cu.

    3. The Role of Surface Hydrogen Atoms in the Electrochemical Reduction of Pyridine and CO2 in Aqueous Electrolyte (pages 1013–1017)

      Dr. Estelle Lebègue, Dr. Julia Agullo, Prof. Mario Morin and Prof. Dr. Daniel Bélanger

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201402065

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      Electrochemistry, fast and slow: An iridium electrode, with a strong affinity for H atoms, shows quasi-reversible electrochemistry for the reduction of pyridinium cations. On the other hand, irreversible reduction occurs at a glassy carbon electrode, characterized by a weaker affinity for H atoms. An increase in the current is observed for both electrodes upon addition of CO2 in the electrolyte.

    4. Stabilizing Lead Cathodes with Diammonium Salt Additives in the Deoxygenation of Aromatic Amides (pages 1018–1022)

      Carolin Edinger, Valentine Grimaudo, Dr. Peter Broekmann and Prof. Dr. Siegfried R. Waldvogel

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201402050

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      Stay positive: Cationic coating through electrical polarization effectively prevents cathodic corrosion of the lead surface, which turns out to be beneficial for the efficiency in the deoxygenation of benzamide.

    5. Electrocatalytic Synergy on Nanoparticulate Films Prepared from Oppositely Charged Pt and Au Nanoparticles (pages 1023–1026)

      Joanna Dolinska, Dr. Palanisamy Kannan, Dr. Volodymyr Sashuk, Dr. Martin Jonsson-Niedziolka, Dr. Zbigniew Kaszkur, Dr. Wojciech Lisowski and Prof. Dr. Marcin Opallo

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201402010

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      Two for the price of one: Electrodes modified with platinum and gold nanoparticles exhibit electrocatalytic synergy for glucose oxidation. Such a simple method of preparation of bimetallic nanoparticulate film produces an electrode with a significant shift in the onset potential compared to electrodes prepared only from platinum or gold nanoparticles.

    6. TiN@VN Nanowire Arrays on 3D Carbon for High-Performance Supercapacitors (pages 1027–1030)

      Dr. Hongchang Pang, Shu Jing Ee, Dr. Yongqiang Dong, Xiaochen Dong and Prof. Peng Chen

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201402005

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      Good synergy: Hybridized core–shell-structured metal-nitride nanowires with a 3D carbon substrate are presented. Such electrodes demonstrate a high volumetric capacitance and good cycling stability, owing to the synergistic integration of titanium nitride and vanadium nitride, as well as the vast surface area and conductive network provided by the microporous 3D carbon structure.

  11. Articles

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover Picture
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Cover Profile
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. Masthead
    9. News
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Articles
    1. Electrocatalytic SiC Nanoparticles/PEDOT:PSS Composite Thin Films as the Counter Electrodes of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 1031–1039)

      Yu-Lin Tsai, Chun-Ting Li, Tzu-Yen Huang, Chi-Ta Lee, Chen-Yang Lin, Dr. Chih-Wei Chu, Dr.  R. Vittal and Prof. Kuo-Chuan Ho

      Version of Record online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300242

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      A Si of relief: A silicon carbide nanoparticles and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (SiC-NPs/PEDOT:PSS) composite film deposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) is used as the counter electrode (CE) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The optimized DSSC shows an efficiency of 7.25 %, whereas a DSSC with a Pt CE shows an efficiency of 7.98 %.

    2. Effective Separation of Lithium Anode and Sulfur Cathode in Lithium–Sulfur Batteries (pages 1040–1045)

      Alen Vizintin, Manu U. M. Patel, Dr. Bostjan Genorio and Dr. Robert Dominko

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201402039

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      Trial separation: A thin interlayer of chemically modified reduced graphene oxide improves the capacity stability of a Li–S battery, making it comparable to the capacity obtained by using lithium-conducting ceramics as separators.

    3. Sequential Activation and Oscillations of Globally Coupled Microelectrodes during a Bistable Reaction (pages 1046–1056)

      Dr. D. Alfonso Crespo-Yapur, Dr. Antoine Bonnefont, Prof. Rolf Schuster, Prof. Katharina Krischer and Prof. Elena R. Savinova

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201402029

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      Working together: A group of Pt microelectrodes can exhibit cooperative phenomena, such as sequential activation and cooperative oscillations, if the electrodes are globally coupled and a reaction with nonlinear kinetics is taking place on them.

    4. Nanoparticle-Impact Experiments are Highly Sensitive to the Presence of Adsorbed Species on Electrode Surfaces (pages 1057–1062)

      Enno Kätelhön, Dr. Wei Cheng, Dr. Christopher Batchelor-McAuley, Dr. Kristina Tschulik and Prof.Dr. Richard G. Compton

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201402014

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      Partially blocked electrodes: Small amounts of adsorbed molecules on an electrode surface can fully suppress its direct or mediated electrochemical interaction with impacting nanoparticles.

    5. Sensitive and Selective Detection of Imidacloprid by Graphene-Oxide-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode (pages 1063–1067)

      Dr. Wu Lei, Zhen Han, Weimeng Si, Prof. Qingli Hao, Yuehua Zhang, Prof. Mingzhu Xia and Prof. Fengyun Wang

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201300244

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      Natural selection: A glassy carbon electrode (GCE) is modified with graphene oxide (GO) by using a simple drop-casting method. An obvious interaction between the hydroxyl group of GO and the nitryl of imidacloprid (IMI) can be observed, which favours electrocatalysis towards IMI. This GO-modified electrode can be utilized as an electrochemical sensor for the detection of IMI with good sensitivity.

    6. Electrochemical Properties of Spinel Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles with Sodium Alginate as Interactive Binder (pages 1068–1074)

      Dr. Sagar Mitra, Pavan S. Veluri, Antara Chakraborthy and Dr. Ramesh K. Petla

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201400026

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      In a bind: Strong adhesion of electrode materials through the interactions between a metal oxide and an interactive binder (alginate) is the root of excellent electrochemical stability and activity of a conversion anode for lithium-ion batteries.

    7. Formic Acid Electrooxidation on Noble-Metal Electrodes: Role and Mechanistic Implications of pH, Surface Structure, and Anion Adsorption (pages 1075–1083)

      Dr. Sylvain Brimaud, Dr. José Solla-Gullón, Isabella Weber, Prof. Juan M. Feliu and Prof. R. Jürgen Behm

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/celc.201400011

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      An unsolved reaction mechanism: None of the mechanistic proposals reported previously can rationalize the activity of noble-metal electrodes towards formic acid oxidation. A systematic investigation under various experimental conditions can provide new ideas.

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