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Nanostructured Polyaniline Sensors

Authors

  • Jiaxing Huang,

    1. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry and California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569, USA, Fax: (+1) 310-206-4038
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  • Shabnam Virji,

    1. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry and California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569, USA, Fax: (+1) 310-206-4038
    2. Materials Processing and Evaluation Department, Space Materials Laboratory, The Aerospace Corporation, P.O. Box 92957 M-2-248, Los Angeles, CA 90009, USA, Fax: (+1) 310-563-8319
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  • Bruce H. Weiller Dr.,

    1. Materials Processing and Evaluation Department, Space Materials Laboratory, The Aerospace Corporation, P.O. Box 92957 M-2-248, Los Angeles, CA 90009, USA, Fax: (+1) 310-563-8319
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  • Richard B. Kaner Prof.

    1. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry and California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569, USA, Fax: (+1) 310-206-4038
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Abstract

The conjugated polymer polyaniline is a promising material for sensors, since its conductivity is highly sensitive to chemical vapors. Nanofibers of polyaniline are found to have superior performance relative to conventional materials due to their much greater exposed surface area. A template-free chemical synthesis is described that produces uniform polyaniline nanofibers with diameters below 100 nm. The interfacial polymerization can be readily scaled to make gram quantities. Resistive-type sensors made from undoped or doped polyaniline nanofibers outperform conventional polyaniline on exposure to acid or base vapors, respectively. The nanofibers show essentially no thickness dependence to their sensitivity.

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