Enantioselective Epoxidation of Terminal Alkenes to (R)- and (S)-Epoxides by Engineered Cytochromes P450 BM-3

Authors

  • Takafumi Kubo,

    1. Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd. MC210–41, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA, Fax: (+1) 626-568-8743
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  • Matthew W. Peters Dr.,

    1. Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd. MC210–41, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA, Fax: (+1) 626-568-8743
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  • Peter Meinhold,

    1. Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd. MC210–41, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA, Fax: (+1) 626-568-8743
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  • Frances H. Arnold Prof.

    1. Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd. MC210–41, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA, Fax: (+1) 626-568-8743
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Abstract

Cytochrome P450 BM-3 from Bacillus megaterium was engineered for enantioselective epoxidation of simple terminal alkenes. Screening saturation mutagenesis libraries, in which mutations were introduced in the active site of an engineered P450, followed by recombination of beneficial mutations generated two P450 BM-3 variants that convert a range of terminal alkenes to either (R)- or (S)-epoxide (up to 83 % ee) with high catalytic turnovers (up to 1370) and high epoxidation selectivities (up to 95 %). A biocatalytic system using E. coli lysates containing P450 variants as the epoxidation catalysts and in vitro NADPH regeneration by the alcohol dehydrogenase from Thermoanaerobium brockii generates each of the epoxide enantiomers, without additional cofactor.

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