High-Speed Carbon Nanotube Actuators Based on an Oxidation/Reduction Reaction

Authors

  • Ken Mukai,

    Corresponding author
    1. Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 72-751-8370
    • Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 72-751-8370
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  • Dr. Kinji Asaka,

    1. Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 72-751-8370
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  • Dr. Kenji Hata,

    1. Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 5, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)
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  • Prof. Toribio Fernández Otero,

    1. Center for Electrochemistry and Intelligent Materials (CEMI), ETSII Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, Paseo Alfonso XIII, Aulario II, 30203 Cartagena (Spain)
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  • Prof. Hideaki Oike

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Organic and Polymer Materials Chemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakacho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 42-388-7233
    • Department of Organic and Polymer Materials Chemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakacho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 42-388-7233
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Abstract

Actuators with a high-speed response under a high-frequency (more than 100 Hz) applied square-wave voltage of ±2 V have been developed with an electrode composed of millimeter-long single-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by the “supergrowth method” (SG-SWNTs) and ionic liquids (ILs). Detailed studies concerning induced electric current and transferred charge in the electrode as well as cyclic voltammetric studies of the electrode revealed that the high-speed response originates from the electric current generated by an oxidation/reduction (redox) reaction in addition to electric double-layer charging. The contribution of the redox reactions of SG-SWNTs to the actuation is sensitive to the presence of supporting polymers, the thickness of the electrolyte, and the amplitude of the applied voltage.

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