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Lithium-Ion Conducting Electrolyte Salts for Lithium Batteries

Authors

  • Dr. Vanchiappan Aravindan,

    Corresponding author
    1. Energy Research Institute (ERI@N), Nanyang Technological University, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)
    • Energy Research Institute (ERI@N), Nanyang Technological University, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)
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  • Dr. Joe Gnanaraj,

    Corresponding author
    1. Yardney Technical Products, Inc. 82 Mechanic Street, Pawcatuck, CT 06379 (USA)
    • Yardney Technical Products, Inc. 82 Mechanic Street, Pawcatuck, CT 06379 (USA)
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  • Prof. Srinivasan Madhavi,

    Corresponding author
    1. Energy Research Institute (ERI@N), Nanyang Technological University, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)
    2. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)
    • Energy Research Institute (ERI@N), Nanyang Technological University, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)
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  • Prof. Hua-Kun Liu

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)
    • Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)
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Abstract

This paper presents an overview of the various types of lithium salts used to conduct Li+ ions in electrolyte solutions for lithium rechargeable batteries. More emphasis is paid towards lithium salts and their ionic conductivity in conventional solutions, solid–electrolyte interface (SEI) formation towards carbonaceous anodes and the effect of anions on the aluminium current collector. The physicochemical and functional parameters relevant to electrochemical properties, that is, electrochemical stabilities, are also presented. The new types of lithium salts, such as the bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB), oxalyldifluoroborate (LiODFB) and fluoroalkylphosphate (LiFAP), are described in detail with their appropriate synthesis procedures, possible decomposition mechanism for SEI formation and prospect of using them in future generation lithium-ion batteries. Finally, the state-of-the-art of the system is given and some interesting strategies for the future developments are illustrated.

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