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Monodisperse REPO4 (RE=Yb, Gd, Y) Hollow Microspheres Covered with Nanothorns as Affinity Probes for Selectively Capturing and Labeling Phosphopeptides

Authors

  • Dr. Gong Cheng,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Changchun 130022 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 431-8569-8041
    2. Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (P.R. China)
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  • Prof. Ji-Lin Zhang,

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Changchun 130022 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 431-8569-8041
    • State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Changchun 130022 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 431-8569-8041
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  • Dr. Yan-Lin Liu,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Changchun 130022 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 431-8569-8041
    2. Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (P.R. China)
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  • Prof. De-Hui Sun,

    1. Changchun Institute Technology, Changchun 130012 (P.R. China)
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  • Prof. Jia-Zuan Ni

    1. State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Changchun 130022 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 431-8569-8041
    2. College of Life Science, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (P.R. China)
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Abstract

Rare-earth phosphate microspheres with unique structures were developed as affinity probes for the selective capture and tagging of phosphopeptides. Prickly REPO4 (RE=Yb, Gd, Y) monodisperse microspheres, that have hollow structures, low densities, high specific surface areas, and large adsorptive capacities were prepared by an ion-exchange method. The elemental compositions and crystal structures of these affinity probes were confirmed by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The morphologies of these compounds were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and nitrogen-adsorption isotherms. The potential ability of these microspheres for selectively capturing and labeling target biological molecules was evaluated by using protein-digestion analysis and a real sample as well as by comparison with the widely used TiO2 affinity microspheres. These results show that these porous rare-earth phosphate microspheres are highly promising probes for the rapid purification and recognition of phosphopeptides.

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