Cover Picture: Hemoglobin as a Nitrite Anhydrase: Modeling Methemoglobin-Mediated N2O3 Formation (Chem. Eur. J. 23/2011)

Authors

  • Dr. Kathrin H. Hopmann,

    1. Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry and Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway), Fax: (+47) 77644765
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  • Dr. Bruno Cardey,

    1. Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry and Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway), Fax: (+47) 77644765
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  • Prof. Mark T. Gladwin,

    1. Vascular Medicine Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 and Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (USA)
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  • Prof. Daniel B. Kim-Shapiro,

    1. Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (USA)
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  • Prof. Abhik Ghosh

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry and Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway), Fax: (+47) 77644765
    • Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry and Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway), Fax: (+47) 77644765
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Abstract

original image

The cover depicts the role of nitrite in hypoxic vasodilation. A key conundrum involves how nitrite-derived NO, generated within the red blood cells, reaches the endothelium while eluding recapture by deoxyhemoglobin. Quantum chemical studies lend credence to a recent suggestion that N2O3 (generated via TS1 or TS2) may be the actual NO-transporting vehicle. For more details see the Full Paper by A. Ghosh et al. on page 6348 ff.

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