Herringbone and Helical Self-Assembly of π-Conjugated Molecules in the Solid State through CH/π Hydrogen Bonds

Authors

  • Mahima Goel,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pune 411008, Maharashtra (India), Fax: (+91) 20-2590 8186
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  • Dr. Manickam Jayakannan

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pune 411008, Maharashtra (India), Fax: (+91) 20-2590 8186
    • Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pune 411008, Maharashtra (India), Fax: (+91) 20-2590 8186
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Abstract

Self-organization of organic molecules through weak noncovalent forces such as CH/π interactions and creation of large hierarchical supramolecular structures in the solid state are at the very early stage of research. The present study reports direct evidence for CH/π interaction driven hierarchical self-assembly in π-conjugated molecules based on custom-designed oligophenylenevinylenes (OPVs) whose structures differ only in the number of carbon atoms in the tails. Single-crystal X-ray structures were resolved for these OPV synthons and the existence of long-range multiple-arm CH/π interactions was revealed in the crystal lattices. Alignment of these π-conjugated OPVs in the solid state was found to be crucial in producing either right-handed herringbone packing in the crystal or left-handed helices in the liquid-crystalline mesophase. Pitch- and roll-angle displacements of OPV chromophores were determined to trace the effect of the molecular inclination on the ordering of hierarchical structures. Furthermore, circular dichroism studies on the OPVs were carried out in the aligned helical structures to prove the existence of molecular self-assembly. Thus, the present strategy opens up new approaches in supramolecular chemistry based on weak CH/π hydrogen bonding, more specifically in π-conjugated materials.

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