Get access

A Metal–Organic Framework as Attractive Cryogenic Magnetorefrigerant

Authors

  • Romain Sibille,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institut Jean Lamour, UMR7198, Equipe 103, Université de Lorraine, Faculté des Sciences, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)
    • Institut Jean Lamour, UMR7198, Equipe 103, Université de Lorraine, Faculté des Sciences, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Thomas Mazet,

    1. Institut Jean Lamour, UMR7198, Equipe 103, Université de Lorraine, Faculté des Sciences, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Prof. Dr. Bernard Malaman,

    1. Institut Jean Lamour, UMR7198, Equipe 103, Université de Lorraine, Faculté des Sciences, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Prof. Dr. Michel François

    1. Institut Jean Lamour, UMR7198, Equipe 103, Université de Lorraine, Faculté des Sciences, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

original image

Magnetocaloric effect: A GdIII-based metal–organic framework (MOF) has an unprecedented large magnetocaloric effect around 2 K. It was shown to be an interesting magnetorefrigerant for ultralow-temperature applications, because it combines the advantages of molecular materials and the robustness of a framework with strong 3D chemical connections (see figure).

Ancillary