Get access
Advertisement

Magnetic Helical Micromachines

Authors

  • Kathrin E. Peyer,

    1. Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland), Fax: (+41) 44-632-1078
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Soichiro Tottori,

    1. Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland), Fax: (+41) 44-632-1078
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Famin Qiu,

    1. Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland), Fax: (+41) 44-632-1078
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Prof. Dr. Li Zhang,

    1. Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin NT, Hong Kong SAR (China)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Prof. Dr. Bradley J. Nelson

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland), Fax: (+41) 44-632-1078
    • Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland), Fax: (+41) 44-632-1078
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Helical microrobots have the potential to be used in a variety of application areas, such as in medical procedures, cell biology, or lab-on-a-chip. They are powered and steered wirelessly using low-strength rotating magnetic fields. The helical shape of the device allows propulsion through numerous types of materials and fluids, from tissue to different types of bodily fluids. Helical propulsion is suitable for pipe flow conditions or for 3D swimming in open fluidic environments.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary