Glycosylated Nanoscale Surfaces: Preparation and Applications in Medicine and Molecular Biology

Authors

  • Dr. David C. Kennedy,

    1. Department of Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany), Fax: (+49) 331-567-9302
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  • Dan Grünstein,

    1. Department of Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany), Fax: (+49) 331-567-9302
    2. Freie Universität Berlin, Institute for Chemistry and Biology, Arnimallee 22, Berlin, 14195 (Germany)
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  • Dr. Chian-Hui Lai,

    1. Department of Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany), Fax: (+49) 331-567-9302
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  • Prof. Dr. Peter H. Seeberger

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany), Fax: (+49) 331-567-9302
    2. Freie Universität Berlin, Institute for Chemistry and Biology, Arnimallee 22, Berlin, 14195 (Germany)
    • Department of Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany), Fax: (+49) 331-567-9302
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Abstract

Carbohydrates on cell surfaces are critical components of the extracellular landscape and contribute to cell signalling, motility, adhesion and recognition. Multivalent effects are essential to these interactions that are inherently weak. Carbohydrate-functionalised surfaces meet an important need for studying the multivalent interactions between carbohydrates and other biomolecules. Innovations in nanomaterials are revolutionising how these carbohydrate interfaces are studied and underscore their importance in the cosmos of biochemical interactions.

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