Cover Picture: Pathway of Oxygen Incorporation from O2 in TiO2 Photocatalytic Hydroxylation of Aromatics: Oxygen Isotope Labeling Studies (Chem. Eur. J. 7/2012)

Authors

  • Dr. Yue Li,

    1. Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 108-261-6495
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  • Dr. Bo Wen,

    1. Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 108-261-6495
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  • Cailan Yu,

    1. Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 108-261-6495
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  • Dr. Chuncheng Chen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 108-261-6495
    • Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 108-261-6495
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  • Dr. Hongwei Ji,

    1. Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 108-261-6495
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  • Dr. Wanhong Ma,

    1. Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 108-261-6495
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  • Dr. Jincai Zhao

    1. Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (P.R. China), Fax: (+86) 108-261-6495
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Abstract

original image

The photocatalytic hydroxylation of aromatic compounds has been investigated by an 18O-labeling method. The results show that the reduction of O2 by conduction-band electrons is indispensable for the O2 incorporation. The formed intermediate H2O2 plays an essential role in the O2 incorporation process. The .OH generated from the reduction of H2O2 is the final active species that introduces the O2-derived O atoms into the hydroxylated product. For more details see the Full Paper by C. Chen et al. on page 2030 ff.

Bimetallic Catalysis

In recent years, new methods to form C[BOND]C bonds using bimetallic systems have emerged. The use of the PdII/AuI combination (as well as the similar PdII/CuI combination) is being pursued with strong interest following the wave of enormous success of catalysis with gold (the amazing “hardly reactive” element of the old textbooks) developed in the last decade, but other metal combinations look also promising. For the latest developments on this subject, see the Review by P. Espinet, J. A. Casares, and M. H. Pérez-Temprano on page 1864 ff.

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Donor–Acceptor Systems

In their Communication on page 1890 ff., R. Ziessel et al. describe the use of an inert closo-carborane spacer that has been functionalized, for the first time, at the vertices with two different functional groups of different reactivity. This strategy allows the stepwise post-linking of two different photoactive modules displaying specific spectroscopic features suitable for efficient singlet energy transfer. This chemistry paves the way for the engineering of larger rigid systems.

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Metal–Organic Frameworks

In their Full Paper on page 1924 ff., J. Zhang et al. report the synthesis of a series of coordination frameworks containing 2D→3D Borromean entanglements; these frameworks show large cavities that can accommodate different kinds of anions with various sizes, shapes, and locations. Gas- and vapor-adsorption studies demonstrate that this system is hydrophilic and size-selective for small, polar molecules and for molecules containing π systems.

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Ancillary