Cover Picture: Saccharide-Modified Nanodiamond Conjugates for the Efficient Detection and Removal of Pathogenic Bacteria (Chem. Eur. J. 21/2012)

Authors

  • Dr. Mirja Hartmann,

    1. Otto Diels Institute for Organic Chemistry, Christiana Albertina University Kiel, Otto-Hahn-Platz 3-4, 24098 Kiel (Germany)
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  • Patrick Betz,

    1. Institute for Organic Chemistry, Würzburg University, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany)
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  • Yuchen Sun,

    1. Institute for Organic Chemistry, Würzburg University, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany)
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  • Prof. Dr. Stanislav N. Gorb,

    1. Department of Functional Morphology and Biomechanics, Zoological Institute, Christiana Albertina University Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany)
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  • Prof. Dr. Thisbe K. Lindhorst,

    Corresponding author
    1. Otto Diels Institute for Organic Chemistry, Christiana Albertina University Kiel, Otto-Hahn-Platz 3-4, 24098 Kiel (Germany)
    • Otto Diels Institute for Organic Chemistry, Christiana Albertina University Kiel, Otto-Hahn-Platz 3-4, 24098 Kiel (Germany)
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  • Prof. Dr. Anke Krueger

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute for Organic Chemistry, Würzburg University, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany)
    2. Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen Research Center for Complex Materials Systems, Würzburg University, 97074 Würzburg (Germany)
    • Institute for Organic Chemistry, Würzburg University, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany)
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Abstract

original image

A carbohydrate-modifiednanodiamond is a valuable new material for the straightforward detection and efficient removal of pathogenic bacteria from polluted water sources. It is nontoxic and can readily be used in difficult environments. Furthermore, sugar specificity of bacterial surface proteins allows for identification and targeted sectioning of particular virulent strains through tailored glycosylation of the nanodiamond surface. For more details see the Full Paper by A. Krueger, T. K. Lindhorst et al. on page 6485 ff.

Bioanalytical Methods

The techniques of rapid modulation and relaxation in living cells are opening up an exciting new avenue of research. Systems that are too complex to fully replicate in vitro at the present time can be studied and compared with in vivo results to see which ingredients are the most critical. Targeted in vitro studies thus become a testing ground for hypotheses based on fast dynamics imaged in vivo. For more details see the Concept article by M. Gruebele et al. on page 6420 ff.

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Fluorescence

In their Communication on page 6437 ff., L. Jiao, E. Hao et al. describe a facile one-pot synthesis of isoindole[BOND]BODIPY dyes based on nucleophilic substitution (SNAr) reactions of in situ formed chlorinated dipyrromethene by pyrrole. These novel isoindole[BOND]BODIPY dyes showed particularly useful optical properties, such as the long-wavelength, sharp absorption and fluorescence, high fluorescence quantum yields (up to 0.91), and high photostability.

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Bowl-Shaped Corannulenes

In their Full Paper on page 6476 ff., M. A. Petrukhina et al. describe for the first time the controlled addition of one and two electrons to a bowl-shaped corannulene and the isolation and structural characterization of the resulting product. The salts of corannulene mono- and dianions with sodium and potassium counterions have been investigated in the solid state and solution and the trends in the coordination preferences of alkali metals have been revealed.

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Ancillary

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