Cover Picture: n-Doping of Organic Electronic Materials Using Air-Stable Organometallics: A Mechanistic Study of Reduction by Dimeric Sandwich Compounds (Chem. Eur. J. 46/2012)

Authors

  • Dr. Song Guo,

    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-5909
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    • These authors contributed equally.

  • Dr. Swagat K. Mohapatra,

    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-5909
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    • These authors contributed equally.

  • Alexander Romanov,

    1. Department of Chemistry, New Mexico Highlands University, Las Vegas, NM 87701 (USA)
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  • Prof. Tatiana V. Timofeeva,

    1. Department of Chemistry, New Mexico Highlands University, Las Vegas, NM 87701 (USA)
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  • Prof. Kenneth I. Hardcastle,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (USA)
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  • Dr. Kada Yesudas,

    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-5909
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  • Dr. Chad Risko,

    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-5909
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  • Prof. Jean-Luc Brédas,

    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-5909
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  • Prof. Seth R. Marder,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-5909
    • School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-5909
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  • Dr. Stephen Barlow

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-5909
    • School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (USA), Fax: (+1) 404-894-5909
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Abstract

original image

The dimers of rhodocenes and mixed cyclopentadienyl/arene Group 8 species are air-stable, but may be used to n-dope materials with electron affinities as low as 2.8 eV. Monitoring these reactions in solution by UV/Vis spectroscopy indicates that two different mechanisms are possible, depending on the dimer in question, the acceptor, and the experimental conditions. In the case of [{RuCp*(C6H3Et3)}2] and 6,13-bis[tri(isopropyl)silylethynyl]pentacene (shown) the reaction proceeds by rate-determining electron transfer from dimer to acceptor, followed by cleavage of the dimer cation. For more details see the Full Paper by S. R. Marder, S. Barlow et al. on page 14760 ff.

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Liquid Crystals

In their Review on page 14560 ff., B. Roy, K. C. Majumdar and N. De summarize several approaches for the synthesis of columnar liquid crystals composed of various heterocyclic systems. They also outline their liquid crystalline and other relevant properties and their suitability for applications in diverse fields.

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Gold and Copper Nanocomposites

In their Communication on page 14605 ff., H. C. Zeng et al. describe a simple, wet transformative approach that is able to synthesize a great variety of complex nanocomposites composed of Cu2O and Au at room temperature. The compositional and structural evolution of the composites can be tuned easily within the same set of synthetic parameters (e.g., the molar ratio of Cu2O to HAuCl4).

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Hydrogels

In their Full Paper on page 14650 ff., T. Wang, M. Liu and Y. Liu describe how the combination of the supramolecular polymers bolaamphiphilic L-histidine and benzene dicarboxylic acid forms hydrogels, even though the components are unable to form gels independently. Depending on the structures of the dicarboxylic acids, the hydrogels show thixotropic properties or strongly enhanced luminescence upon doping with EuIII.

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Ancillary