Cover Picture: Catalytic and Mechanistic Insights of the Low-Temperature Selective Oxidation of Methane over Cu-Promoted Fe-ZSM-5 (Chem. Eur. J. 49/2012)

Authors

  • Dr. Ceri Hammond,

    Corresponding author
    1. Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (UK)
    2. Current address: Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zürich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)
    • Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (UK)
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  • Dr. Robert L. Jenkins,

    1. Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (UK)
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  • Dr. Nikolaos Dimitratos,

    1. Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (UK)
    2. Current addresses: Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, WC1H 0AJ London (UK) and Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, OX11 0FA (UK)
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  • Dr. Jose Antonio Lopez-Sanchez,

    1. Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (UK)
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  • Dr. Mohd Hasbi ab Rahim,

    1. Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (UK)
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  • Dr. Michael M. Forde,

    1. Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (UK)
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  • Adam Thetford,

    1. Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (UK)
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  • Dr. Damien M. Murphy,

    1. Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (UK)
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  • Dr. Henk Hagen,

    1. Dow Benelux B. V., Herbert H. Dowweg 5, 4542 NM HOEK, Postbus 48, 4530 AA Terneuzen (the Netherlands)
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  • Dr. Eric E. Stangland,

    1. National Corporate R&D, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI 48674 (USA)
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  • Prof. Jacob M. Moulijn,

    1. Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (UK)
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  • Dr. Stuart H. Taylor,

    1. Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (UK)
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  • Dr. David J. Willock,

    1. Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (UK)
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  • Prof. Graham J. Hutchings

    Corresponding author
    1. Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (UK)
    • Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (UK)
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Abstract

original image

Methane to methanolconversion presents one of the most challenging targets in catalysis. Recently, it was demonstrated that an iron- and copper-containing MFI-type zeolite is able to catalytically convert methane to methanol in an aqueous solvent at selectivities above 90 % by using H2O2 as the terminal oxidant. To facilitate understanding of the precise roles of the catalyst and the full mechanistic cycle, C. Hammond, G. J. Hutchings et al. present an in-depth study of the kinetic parameters and mechanistic features of this system in their Full Paper on page 15735 ff. The catalytic system in question results in a low-energy methane activation route, and allows selective C1-oxidation to occur under mild reaction conditions.

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Macrocyclization of Oligoprolines

Despite the documented rigidity of homochiral oligoprolines, their macrocyclization could be forced with the help of zwitterionic control. The cyclization protocol proceeds within short reaction times and does not yield any oligomerization or polymerization byproducts. Cyclization of the zwitterionic intermediate in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol is largely driven by the attractive electrostatic force of the two oppositely charged termini, the carboxylate and the isonitrilium ions. For more details, see the Communication on page 15612 ff., by A. K. Yudin et al.

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Neurotrophic Factors

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a protein essential for neuronal survival and axonal guidance. Its homeostasis is altered during different neurodegenerative disorders, in particular Alzheimer's disease. In their Full Paper on page 15618 D. La Mendola et al. show that a peptide representing the N-terminal region, BDNF(1–12), mimics the proliferative activity of the whole protein. The addition of Cu2+ induces a decrease in activity of both the peptide and the protein.

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Nanoporous Materials

In their Full Paper on page 15662 ff., J. Huh, C. Park et al. demonstrate a simple, but robust self-assembly process for fabricating well-organized, nanoporous, ultrathin templates with control over both size and interdomain distance through conventional solution blending and spin-coating processes by using mono-end-sulfonated polystyrene (SPS)/mono-end-aminated poly(ethylene oxide) (APEO), for which SPS and APEO are reversibly end-associated.

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Ancillary