Carbon Nano-Onions and Biocompatible Polymers for Flavonoid Incorporation

Authors

  • Dr. Marta E. Plonska-Brzezinska,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Chemistry, University of Bialystok, Hurtowa 1, 15-399 Bialystok (Poland), Fax: (+48) 85-7470113
    • Institute of Chemistry, University of Bialystok, Hurtowa 1, 15-399 Bialystok (Poland), Fax: (+48) 85-7470113
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  • Diana M. Brus,

    1. Institute of Chemistry, University of Bialystok, Hurtowa 1, 15-399 Bialystok (Poland), Fax: (+48) 85-7470113
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  • Joanna Breczko,

    1. Institute of Chemistry, University of Bialystok, Hurtowa 1, 15-399 Bialystok (Poland), Fax: (+48) 85-7470113
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  • Prof. Luis Echegoyen

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (USA), Fax: (+1) 915-7478807
    • Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (USA), Fax: (+1) 915-7478807
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Abstract

original image

Biocompatible onions: Different composites of carbon nano-onions (CNOs) and poly(4-vinylpyridine-co-styrene) (PVPS) or poly(ethylene glycol)/polysorbate 20 (PEG-P20) were prepared by non-covalent modification. Attachment creates the charged CNO surface for further functionalization with 3-mercaptopropionic (MPA) or 2-mercapto-4-methyl-5-thiazoleacetic acids. Such hydrophilic CNO composites were an appropriate platform for electrostatic immobilization of polyphenolic compounds, such as quercetin (Q).

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