Molecular-Level Understanding of the Carbonisation of Polysaccharides

Authors

  • Dr. Peter S. Shuttleworth,

    Corresponding author
    1. Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, University of York, Heslington, York, Yorkshire, YO10 5DD (UK), Fax: (+44) 1904-432705
    2. Current address: Departamento de Física de Polímeros, Elastómeros y Aplicaciones Energéticas, Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros, CSIC c/Juan de la Cierva, 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain)
    • Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, University of York, Heslington, York, Yorkshire, YO10 5DD (UK), Fax: (+44) 1904-432705
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  • Dr. Vitaliy Budarin,

    1. Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, University of York, Heslington, York, Yorkshire, YO10 5DD (UK), Fax: (+44) 1904-432705
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  • Dr. Robin J. White,

    1. IASS Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies e. V. Berliner Strasse 130, 14467 Potsdam (Germany)
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  • Prof. Vladimir M. Gun'ko,

    1. Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Street, Kiev 03164 (Ukraine)
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  • Dr. Rafael Luque,

    1. Departamento de Química Orgánica, Universidad de Córdoba, Edificio Marie Curie (C3), 14014 Córdoba (Spain)
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  • Prof. James H. Clark

    1. Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, University of York, Heslington, York, Yorkshire, YO10 5DD (UK), Fax: (+44) 1904-432705
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Abstract

Understanding of both the textural and functionality changes occurring during (mesoporous) polysaccharide carbonisation at the molecular level provides a deeper insight into the whole spectrum of material properties, from chemical activity to pore shape and surface energy, which is crucial for the successful application of carbonaceous materials in adsorption, catalysis and chromatography. Obtained information will help to identify the most appropriate applications of the carbonaceous material generated during torrefaction and different types of pyrolysis processes and therefore will be important for the development of cost- and energy-efficient zero-waste biorefineries. The presented approach is informative and semi-quantitative with the potential to be extended to the formation of other biomass-derived carbonaceous materials.

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