Cover Picture: Development of Palladium Surface-Enriched Heteronuclear Au–Pd Nanoparticle Dehalogenation Catalysts in an Ionic Liquid (Chem. Eur. J. 4/2013)

Authors

  • Dr. Xiao Yuan,

    1. PKU Green Chemistry Center, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (P.R. China)
    2. Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland)
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  • Geng Sun,

    1. PKU Green Chemistry Center, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (P.R. China)
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  • Hiroyuki Asakura,

    1. Department of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto (Japan)
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  • Prof. Tsunehiro Tanaka,

    1. Department of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto (Japan)
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  • Xi Chen,

    1. Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260 (Singapore)
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  • Dr. Yuan Yuan,

    1. Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland)
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  • Prof. Gabor Laurenczy,

    1. Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland)
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  • Prof. Yuan Kou,

    1. PKU Green Chemistry Center, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (P.R. China)
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  • Prof. Paul J. Dyson,

    1. Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland)
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  • Prof. Ning Yan

    Corresponding author
    1. Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland)
    2. Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260 (Singapore)
    • Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland)
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Abstract

original image

Bimetallic Au–Pd nanoparticles were prepared in the functionalized ionic liquid [C2OHmim][NTf2] by the thermal decomposition of Pd(OAc)2 and Au(OAc)3. The Au atoms are mostly located in the NP core, leaving the Pd atoms enriched at the surface. Moreover, the Pd atoms are electropositive, which leads to high activity in catalytic dehalogenation reactions. The activity of the heteronuclear nanoparticles may be attributed to charge transfer from Pd to Au and consequently to more efficient reductive elimination. For more details, see the Full Paper by N. Yan et al. on page 1227 ff.

Cartoon 1.

Microwave Chemistry

The direct C[BOND]H arylation of (hetero)arenes has gradually emerged as a viable alternative for traditional cross-coupling reactions. In this context, the application of focused microwave irradiation has opened new avenues by ameliorating the major bottlenecks like low yields, prolonged reaction times, and/or high catalyst loadings. For more details see the Minireview by E. Van der Eycken et al. on page 1158 ff.

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Biomimetic Synthesis

The synthesis of the newly marketed anticancer drug vinflunine classically starts from the biomimetic coupling of catharanthine and vindoline, two monomeric units extracted from the leaves of the Madagascar periwinkle, followed by superacidic fluorination to afford vinflunine. An alternative approach for the synthesis of vinflunine (see dashed arrows) is presented by E. Doris et al. in their Communication on page 1170 ff. This strategy is based on the direct fluorination of the catharanthine skeleton under mild conditions and biomimetic coupling of the resulting difluorocatharanthine with the vindoline unit. However, unexpected products arose from the biomimetic coupling step.

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DNA Recognition

The sensitive fluorimetric detection of G-quadruplex DNA in biological samples is a challenging task, requiring fluorescent probes with high selectivity over duplex DNA. In their Full Paper on page 1214 ff., M.-P. Teulade-Fichou et al. show that asymmetric (2,4-disubstituted) distyrylpyridinium dyes selectively bind to quadruplex DNA structures over double-stranded DNA and their fluorescence is selectively increased in the presence of quadruplex DNAs. The analogous symmetric dye displays a strong binding preference for double-stranded DNA and its fluorimetric response is increased equally by quadruplex and duplex DNA.

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Ancillary