Cover Picture: Azaphthalocyanines: Red Fluorescent Probes for Cations (Chem. Eur. J. 16/2013)

Authors

  • Dr. Veronika Novakova,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biophysics and Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)
    • Department of Biophysics and Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lukáš Lochman,

    1. Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Drug Control, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ivana Zajícová,

    1. Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Drug Control, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Kamil Kopecky,

    1. Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Drug Control, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Miroslav Miletin,

    1. Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Drug Control, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Kamil Lang,

    1. Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i. Husinec-Řež1001, 250 68 Řež(Czech Republic)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Kaplan Kirakci,

    1. Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i. Husinec-Řež1001, 250 68 Řež(Czech Republic)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Prof. Petr Zimcik

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Drug Control, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)
    • Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Drug Control, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

original image

The concept of sensing metal cations by using fluorescence changes in non-aggregating AzaPc molecules that exhibit significant intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) in the OFF state was demonstrated by binding Na+ and K+ to an aza[15]crown-5 recognition moiety. It is important to note that this concept works not only in organic solvents, but also in water after the sensor molecules are incorporated into silica nanoparticles. For more details see the Communication by V. Novakova, P. Zimcik et al. on page 5025 ff.

Cartoon 1.

The concept of sensing metal cations by using fluorescence changes in non-aggregating AzaPc molecules that exhibit significant intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) in the OFF state was demonstrated by binding Na+ and K+ to an aza[15]crown-5 recognition moiety. It is important to note that this concept works not only in organic solvents, but also in water after the sensor molecules are incorporated into silica nanoparticles. For more details see the Communication by V. Novakova, P. Zimcik et al. on page 5025 ff.

Asymmetric Hydroamination

Asymmetric hydroamination allows the direct and selective formation of a new C[BOND]N bond as a simple procedure towards valuable scalemic synthons. Recently, huge efforts have been made to overcome the challenges associated with this transformation. In their Concept article on page 4972 ff., E. Schulz and J. Hannedouche highlight the most recent and original advances in the field of asymmetric hydroamination of carbon–carbon double bonds, offering nearby developments, and addressing the next challenges.

Thumbnail image of

Visible-Light Water Splitting

Water splitting by visible light has been described as one of the “holy grails” of chemistry. In their Communication on page 4986 ff., K. Maeda, K. Domen et al. demonstrated direct splitting of pure water into H2 and O2 under visible light (λ>400 nm) by using a modified TaON photocatalyst with d0 electronic configuration. Applying a less-defective TaON (here ZrO2-modified TaON), further decollated with RuOx/Cr2O3 (core/shell) nanoparticles and colloidal IrO2 as promoters, is the key to achieving the reaction.

Thumbnail image of

Peptide Nucleic Acids

Selective discrimination of a single-nucleotide difference in single-stranded DNA or RNA remains a challenge with conventional DNA or RNA probes. A peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-derived probe, in which PNA forms a pseudocomplementary heteroduplex with inosine-containing DNA or RNA, effectively discriminates a single-nucleotide difference in a closely related group of sequences of single-stranded DNA and/or RNA. For more details, see the Full Paper by T. Morii et al. on page 5034 ff.

Thumbnail image of

Ancillary