Chemistry - A European Journal

Cover image for Vol. 17 Issue 11

March 7, 2011

Volume 17, Issue 11

Pages 3037–3299

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Bis(2,2′-biphenoxy)borates for Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitor Electrolytes (Chem. Eur. J. 11/2011) (page 3037)

      Robert Francke, Dario Cericola, Dr. Rüdiger Kötz, Dr. Gregor Schnakenburg and Prof. Dr. Siegfried R. Waldvogel

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201190049

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      The current supporting electrolytes for electrochemical double-layer capacitors still exhibit a pronounced lack of thermal stability, which leads to safety concerns and limits larger scale applications. In their communication on page 3082 ff., S. R. Waldvogel et al. present a new approach to circumvent this safety issue. The use of bis(2,2′-biphenoxy)borates results in a significantly higher chemical and thermal stability, which reaches a maximum with the introduction of two fluorine substituents per benzo moiety.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Coupled Crystallographic Order–Disorder and Spin State in a Bistable Molecule: Multiple Transition Dynamics (Chem. Eur. J. 11/2011) (page 3038)

      Gavin A. Craig, Dr. José Sánchez Costa, Dr. Olivier Roubeau, Dr. Simon J. Teat and Dr. Guillem Aromí

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201190050

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      Within spin-crossover solids… … strong intermolecular interactions afford a means for the propagation of molecular-scale changes and coupling with crystallographic phase transitions, which leads to intricate cooperative phenomena. In their Full Paper on page 3120 ff., J. S. Costa, O. Roubeau, G. Aromí et al. report on a novel spin-crossover FeII complex that features a dense network of intermolecular interactions. This results in a large unsymmetrical hysteresis of the spin state, which correlates with a crystallographic order–disorder transition.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: Chem. Eur. J. 11/2011 (pages 3041–3048)

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201190051

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
  5. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. Biomaterials

      Localized, Targeted, and Sustained siRNA Delivery (pages 3054–3062)

      Dr. Melissa D. Krebs and Dr. Eben Alsberg

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201003144

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      Tackling the problem of localized siRNA delivery: RNA interference is a powerful gene-silencing mechanism that inhibits gene expression by the targeted destruction of specific mRNA molecules. It has the potential to revolutionize disease treatment and aid in the functional repair of damaged tissue by decreasing the expression of specific proteins. However, effective delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA) to target cells in vivo remains a significant challenge. This article describes current research towards the localized and sustained delivery of siRNA.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. Host–Guest Systems

      Supramolecular Control of Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Transformation through Selective Guest Exchange (pages 3064–3068)

      Dr. Chiara Massera, Dr. Monica Melegari, Dr. Elina Kalenius, Prof. Franco Ugozzoli and Prof. Enrico Dalcanale

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201003407

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      Guest-switchable crystals: A solid-state guest exchange of the tetraphosphonate cavitand Tiiii[H,CH3,Ph] as host promotes single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations (see graphic). The strong preference for methanol over water is observed in all three phases (gas, liquid, solid), thus demonstrating the fundamental role played by the preorganized cavity through synergistic H-bonds and C[BOND]H⋅⋅⋅π interactions.

    2. Synthetic Methods

      A General Synthetic Strategy for the Design of New BODIPY Fluorophores Based on Pyrroles with Polycondensed Aromatic and Metallocene Substituents (pages 3069–3073)

      Dr. Elena Yu. Schmidt, Dr. Nadezhda V. Zorina, Dr. Marina Yu. Dvorko, Dr. Nadezhda I. Protsuk, Dr. Kseniya V. Belyaeva, Dr. Gilles Clavier, Prof. Dr. Rachel Méallet-Renault, Thanh T. Vu, Prof. Dr. Al'bina I. Mikhaleva and Prof. Dr. Boris A. Trofimov

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201003242

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      BODIPYrrole: A general strategy for the design of novel BODIPY fluorophores based on pyrroles with polycondensed aromatic and metallocene substituents has been developed. The strategy involves the acylation of the condensed substituent and treatment of the acylated derivative (as oxime) with acetylene in MOH/DMSO (M=alkali metal) to give pyrroles that were then used for assembly of the BODIPY fluorophores (see scheme).

    3. Nanowires

      Disproportionation for Growing Copper Nanowires and their Controlled Self-Assembly Facilitated by Ligand Exchange (pages 3074–3077)

      Dr. Enyi Ye, Shuang-Yuan Zhang, Dr. Shuhua Liu and Prof. Ming-Yong Han

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002987

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      The coating makes the wire bundle: High-quality free-standing copper nanowires have been successfully produced by disproportionation of Cu+ in oleylamine. This provides an effective way to prepare high-quality copper nanowires, but also enriches synthetic routes to other nanostructures. These copper nanowires can self-assemble by surface ligand exchange of oleylamine with trioctylphosphine.

    4. Gas-Phase Chemistry

      The “Bridge” Game: Role of the Fourth Player in Chiral Recognition (pages 3078–3081)

      Caterina Fraschetti, Marco Pierini, Claudio Villani, Francesco Gasparrini, Stefano Levi Mortera, Antonello Filippi and Maurizio Speranza

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002828

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      A new team player: The “three-point interaction” model, which is usually employed to rationalize chiral recognition, does not account for the amazing enantioselectivity measured for the receptors of many proteic acceptors. Gas-phase experiments have indicated that at least a fourth “player” must be considered: the rigidity that a receptor opposes to distortions of its cavity resulting from noncovalent interactions with a chiral molecule (see picture).

    5. Energy Storage

      Bis(2,2′-biphenoxy)borates for Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitor Electrolytes (pages 3082–3085)

      Robert Francke, Dario Cericola, Dr. Rüdiger Kötz, Dr. Gregor Schnakenburg and Prof. Dr. Siegfried R. Waldvogel

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201003449

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      Fluorine makes the difference! Bis(2,2′-biphenoxy)borates decorated with fluorine substituents have been synthesized and studied in supercapacitor test cells (see scheme). A clear trend towards higher electrochemical stability with the increase of the fluorine content has been observed. For a maximum performance, only two fluorine substituents per benzene moiety are required.

    6. Pd-Catalyzed Reactions

      Amination with Pd–NHC Complexes: Rate and Computational Studies on the Effects of the Oxidative Addition Partner (pages 3086–3090)

      Ka Hou Hoi, Dr. Selçuk Çalimsiz, Dr. Robert D. J. Froese, Prof. Alan C. Hopkinson and Prof. Michael G. Organ

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002988

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      Pd-PEPPSI-IPent, a recently-developed N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex, has been evaluated in amination reactions with secondary amines and it has shown superb reactivity under the most mildly basic reaction conditions. Rate and computational studies were conducted to provide insight into the mechanism of the transformation. The IPent catalyst coordinates to the amine much more strongly than the IPr variant, thus favouring deprotonation with comparatively weak bases. Indeed the reaction is first order in base and only slightly more than zeroth order in amine.

    7. Conjugate Addition

      Pd–NHC Catalyzed Conjugate Addition versus the Mizoroki–Heck Reaction (pages 3091–3095)

      Aditya L. Gottumukkala, Prof. Dr. Johannes G. de Vries and Prof. Dr. Adriaan J. Minnaard

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201003643

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      Ace of base: A catalytic system is presented that, solely by choice of the base, selectively switches between conjugate addition and the Mizoroki–Heck reaction of aryl halides with Michael acceptors (see scheme; R, R′=alkyl, aryl). For conjugate addition reactions, this avoids the preparation and use of organometallics.

    8. Radiolabeling

      Silicon-Based Chemistry: An Original and Efficient One-Step Approach to [18F]-Nucleosides and [18F]-Oligonucleotides for PET Imaging (pages 3096–3100)

      Dr. Jürgen Schulz, Dr. Delphine Vimont, Thomas Bordenave, Dr. Damien James, Dr. Jean-Marc Escudier, Prof. Michèle Allard, Dr. Magali Szlosek-Pinaud and Prof. Eric Fouquet

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201003234

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      Take it eaSi! Nucleosides, dinucleotides, and one oligonucleotide, all modified by click chemistry, have for the first time been directly and very efficiently labeled with 18F by using a silicon-based, one-step approach that opens the way for the development of a new class of positron emission tomography (PET) tracers (see graphic).

    9. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Enantioselective Gold-Catalyzed Functionalization of Unreactive sp3 C[BOND]H Bonds through a Redox–Neutral Domino Reaction (pages 3101–3104)

      Guanghua Zhou, Feng Liu and Prof. Dr. Junliang Zhang

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100019

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      Selectivity is golden: The first asymmetric redox–neutral domino reaction catalyzed by gold that results in the direct functionalization of unreactive sp3 C[BOND]H bonds has been reported. This method consists of a heterocyclization/1,5-hydride transfer/cyclization reaction and provides synthetically valuable azepines with high enantioselectivities and in high yields (Tf=triflate; see scheme).

    10. Molecular Recognition

      Engineering O-Glycosylation Points in Non-extended Peptides: Implications for the Molecular Recognition of Short Tumor-Associated Glycopeptides (pages 3105–3110)

      Dr. Francisco Corzana, Dr. Jesús H. Busto, Dr. Filipa Marcelo, Dr. Marisa García de Luis, Dr. Juan Luis Asensio, Dr. Sonsoles Martín-Santamaría, Prof. Jesús Jiménez-Barbero, Prof. Alberto Avenoza and Prof. Jesús M. Peregrina

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201003124

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      The ties that bind: The incorporation of non-natural residues in the peptide backbone allows the design of O-glycosylation points in helical segments. This strategy could help to modulate the binding properties between glycopeptides and their protein receptors, such as lectins and antibodies.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. Sensors

      Hydroxydialkylamino Cruciforms: Amphoteric Materials with Unique Photophysical Properties (pages 3112–3119)

      Dr. Psaras L. McGrier, Dr. Kyril M. Solntsev, Dr. Anthony J. Zucchero, Oscar R. Miranda, Prof. Vincent M. Rotello, Prof. Laren M. Tolbert and Prof. Uwe H. F. Bunz

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002865

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      “X” marks the spot! The synthesis of two cruciform (XF) compounds that show significant changes in their absorption and emission on exposure to trifluroacetic acid, tetrabutylammonium hydroxide, and metal triflates is reported. The XF compound with hydroxyl groups on the styryl axis displays changes in emission color upon exposure to ten amines in eight different solvents.

    2. Crystal Engineering

      Coupled Crystallographic Order–Disorder and Spin State in a Bistable Molecule: Multiple Transition Dynamics (pages 3120–3127)

      Gavin A. Craig, Dr. José Sánchez Costa, Dr. Olivier Roubeau, Dr. Simon J. Teat and Dr. Guillem Aromí

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201003197

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      All is in order when the spin is low: A spin-crossover FeII complex with a bispyrazolylpyridine ligand incorporating lateral phenol groups exhibits a large, unsymmetrical bistable domain that correlates with crystallographic ordering (see figure) and propagates through an intricate network of intermolecular interactions.

    3. Cluster Compounds

      LiB12PC, the First Boron-Rich Metal Boride with Phosphorus—Synthesis, Crystal Structure, Hardness, Spectroscopic Investigations (pages 3128–3135)

      Dr. Natascha Vojteer, Dipl.-Chem. Vanessa Sagawe, Julia Stauffer, Dr. Melanie Schroeder and Prof. Dr. Harald Hillebrecht

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002968

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      Strike it rich! Single crystals of three different forms of the first boron-rich boride phosphide carbide were obtained from metallic flux. The differences result from the P/C ratio. Electron-precise LiB12PC (see figure) is colourless, excess of P results in red LiB12P1.13C0.87 and excess of C in brown LiB12P0.89C1.11.

    4. Macrocycles

      Phthalocyanine Analogues: Unexpectedly Facile Access to Non-Peripherally Substituted Octaalkyl Tetrabenzotriazaporphyrins, Tetrabenzodiazaporphyrins, Tetrabenzomonoazaporphyrins and Tetrabenzoporphyrins (pages 3136–3146)

      Dr. Andrew N. Cammidge, Dr. Isabelle Chambrier, Prof. Michael J. Cook, Dr. David L. Hughes, Dr. Muhibur Rahman and Lydia Sosa-Vargas

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002176

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      Chemical cousins: For the first time, porphyrin–phthalocyanine hybrids (see picture; M=Mg or CuII) have been prepared conveniently and in a controlled manner, allowing the effects of sequential C/N exchange to be investigated across a complete series of these scarcely studied structures.

    5. Light-Harvesting Complexes

      Photochemical Charge Separation in Closely Positioned Donor–Boron Dipyrrin–Fullerene Triads (pages 3147–3156)

      Channa A. Wijesinghe, Dr. Mohamed E. El-Khouly, Navaneetha K. Subbaiyan, Mustafa Supur, Prof. Melvin E. Zandler, Dr. Kei Ohkubo, Prof. Shunichi Fukuzumi and Prof. Francis D'Souza

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002446

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      Light-harvesting triads: In a newly synthesized series of closely linked donor1–acceptor1–acceptor2-type and antenna–donor1–acceptor1-type triads, comprising of boron dipyrrin and fullerene primary entities, and a third redox-active or antenna entity (see scheme), a photoinduced energy and electron transfer was proven by femtosecond and nanosecond transient spectroscopic techniques. Charge separation was observed, thereby signifying their importance as materials for light-harvesting applications.

    6. DNA Targeting

      C5-Functionalized DNA, LNA, and α-L-LNA: Positional Control of Polarity-Sensitive Fluorophores Leads to Improved SNP-Typing (pages 3157–3165)

      Dr. Michael E. Østergaard, Dr. Pawan Kumar, Bharat Baral, Dale C. Guenther, Brooke A. Anderson, Prof. F. Marty Ytreberg, Dr. Lee Deobald, Prof. Andrzej J. Paszczynski, Prof. Pawan K. Sharma and Prof. Patrick J. Hrdlicka

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002109

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      SNP discrimination with LNA: Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are discriminated by using DNA monomer X or the corresponding C5-functionalized locked nucleic acid (LNA) and α-L-LNA monomers Y and Z. Improved positional control of the polarity-sensitive pyrene label results in larger hybridization-induced increases in fluorescence intensity, formation of brightly fluorescent duplexes upon hybridization to complementary nucleic acids, and efficient SNP discrimination.

    7. Theoretical Chemistry

      Computational Studies on Azaphosphiridines, or How to Effect Ring-Opening Processes through Selective Bond Activation (pages 3166–3178)

      Dr. Arturo Espinosa and Prof. Rainer Streubel

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002565

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      Selective P[BOND]N or C[BOND]N bond cleavage: The thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities of azaphosphiridine derivatives (see figure) were evaluated by high-level quantum chemical calculations. The ring-strain energies were computed from the homodesmic reactions; these could also be deduced from the analysis of bond strength parameters such as electron density at bond critical points, Wiberg's bond indices, and relaxed force constants, making them a powerful predictive tool.

    8. Sensors

      Convenient and Efficient FRET Platform Featuring a Rigid Biphenyl Spacer between Rhodamine and BODIPY: Transformation of ‘Turn-On’ Sensors into Ratiometric Ones with Dual Emission (pages 3179–3191)

      Haibo Yu, Prof. Dr. Yi Xiao, Haiying Guo and Prof. Dr. Xuhong Qian

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002498

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      Flick of a switch! Two ratiomeric sensors containing borondipyrromethene (BODIPY) as a donor and rhodamine as an acceptor linked by a rigid biphenyl spacer were constructed. The ratios of emission intensities of BODIPY and rhodamine resulted in color changes that allowed the detection and imaging of Hg2+ in cells (see scheme).

    9. Supramolecular Chemistry

      Complexation Equilibria Involving Salts in Non-Aqueous Solvents: Ion Pairing and Activity Considerations (pages 3192–3206)

      Prof. Dr. Harry W. Gibson, Dr. Jason W. Jones, Dr. Lev N. Zakharov, Prof. Dr. Arnold L. Rheingold and Dr. Carla Slebodnick

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002522

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      Adequate description: Formation of complexes that are not ion paired from ion-paired salts in low polarity media requires evaluation of two equilibrium constants (Kipd and Ka5) and activity coefficients for adequate description.

    10. Alkaloid Synthesis

      Concise Synthesis of Pyrrolidine and Indolizidine Alkaloids by a Highly Convergent Three-Component Reaction (pages 3207–3212)

      Guillaume Lapointe, Dr. Kurt Schenk and Prof. Philippe Renaud

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201003137

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      Three's not a crowd! The synthesis of pyrrolidine and indolizidine derivatives through radical carboazidation of alkenes with α-iodoketones, followed by reductive amination, is described. Three different simple alkaloids were synthesized, including (±)-monomorine I (see scheme).

    11. Carbon Nitrides

      Poly(triazine imide) with Intercalation of Lithium and Chloride Ions [(C3N3)2(NHxLi1−x)3⋅LiCl]: A Crystalline 2D Carbon Nitride Network (pages 3213–3221)

      Eva Wirnhier, Dr. Markus Döblinger, Daniel Gunzelmann, Prof. Dr. Jürgen Senker, Prof. Dr. Bettina V. Lotsch and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Schnick

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002462

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      Crystal clear: The high crystallinity of a polymeric carbon nitride (CN) material has allowed for an unambiguous structure solution from powder XRD data. The synthesis of the graphite-like, triazine-based structure (see picture) stirs up the discussion about the nature of the building blocks of the ultimate CN condensation product, graphitic carbon nitride, anew.

    12. Nanomaterials

      One-Pot Triple Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes (pages 3222–3227)

      Dr. Cécilia Ménard-Moyon, Chiara Fabbro, Prof. Maurizio Prato and Dr. Alberto Bianco

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201003050

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      Hard graft: Covalent trifunctionalization of different types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been accomplished (see scheme). The strategy relies on the simultaneous functionalization of the nanotube surface with three different active groups that are blocked with three different protecting groups, which can be selectively and sequentially removed under specific conditions.

    13. Surface Chemistry

      Surface Chemistry in the Process of Coating Mesoporous SiO2 onto Carbon Nanotubes Driven by the Formation of Si[BOND]O[BOND]C Bonds (pages 3228–3237)

      Amauri J. Paula, Diego Stéfani, Prof.  Antonio G. Souza Filho, Prof.  Yoong Ahm Kim, Prof.  Morinobu Endo and Prof.  Oswaldo L. Alves

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002455

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      Nanotube surface chemistry: In contrast to the simple approach normally used to describe the attachment of inorganic compounds on oxidized carbon nanotubes (CNTs), SiO2 nucleation on the tubes is a result of nucleophilic attack mainly by hydroxyl radicals, localized in a very complex surface-chemical environment, where various oxygenated groups are covalently bonded to the sidewall, and carboxylated carbonaceous fragments (CCFs) are adsorbed on the tubes. Preferential attachment on the sidewall results mostly in CNTs with uncapped ends (see picture).

    14. Carboranes

      Synthesis and Reactivity of 4,5-[1,2-Dicarba-closo-dodecaborano(12)]-1,3-diselenacyclopentane: Opening of the Icosahedron to Give a Zwitterionic Intermediate and Conversion into 7,8-Dicarba-nido-undecaborate(1−) (pages 3238–3251)

      Prof. Dr. Bernd Wrackmeyer, Dr. Elena V. Klimkina, Dr. Wolfgang Milius, Tobias Bauer and Prof. Dr. Rhett Kempe

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002277

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      Open for business: 4,5-[1,2-Dicarba-closo-dodecaborano(12)]-1,3-diselenacyclopentane reacts reversibly with pyridine by the opening of the icosahedron to give a zwitterionic intermediate with a nido structure, followed by irreversible deboronation to afford the corresponding 7,8-dicarba-nido-undecaborate(1−) anion (see figure).

    15. Dipolar Cycloadditions

      Synthesis of Dodecavalent Fullerene-Based Glycoclusters and Evaluation of Their Binding Properties towards a Bacterial Lectin (pages 3252–3261)

      Samy Cecioni, Vincent Oerthel, Dr. Julien Iehl, Dr. Michel Holler, David Goyard, Dr. Jean-Pierre Praly, Dr. Anne Imberty, Dr. Jean-François Nierengarten and Dr. Sébastien Vidal

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201003258

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      Fullerene sugar balls at work: Dodecavalent fullerene-based glycoclusters have been synthesized by azide–alkyne “click” chemistry (see figure). These high-density glycoclusters have been evaluated as ligands of PA-IL, a bacterial lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that causes lung infections.

    16. Supramolecular Chemistry

      From Molecular to Macroscopic Engineering: Shaping Hydrogen-Bonded Organic Nanomaterials (pages 3262–3273)

      Dr. K. Yoosaf, Dr. Anna Llanes-Pallas, Tomas Marangoni, Dr. Abdelhalim Belbakra, Dr. Riccardo Marega, Dr. Edith Botek, Prof. Benoît Champagne, Prof. Davide Bonifazi  and Dr. Nicola Armaroli

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002103

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      Supramolecular nanomaterials: By optimizing complementary hydrogen-bonding interactions and molecular geometry, under solvent and temperature control, nanomaterials of various shapes and structures, such as vesicles, wires, rods, and rings, have been obtained from acetylenic scaffolds bearing 2,6-di(acetylamino)pyridine and uracyl-type terminal groups (see scheme).

    17. Porphyrinoids

      How Does Aromaticity Rule the Thermodynamic Stability of Hydroporphyrins? (pages 3274–3286)

      Nicolás Otero, Stijn Fias, Dr. Slavko Radenković, Prof. Patrick Bultinck, Prof. Ana M. Graña and Dr. Marcos Mandado

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002599

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      Ring the changes: The thermodynamic stability of the series of hydroporphyrins ranging from porphin to octahydroporphin has been rationalized by using different aromaticity criteria, including magnetic, energetic, and electron density indices of aromaticity. The results explain the preferred hydrogenation paths of different isomers (see ring-current plots).

    18. DNA Delivery

      High Transfection Efficiency of Cationic Lipids with Asymmetric Acyl–Cholesteryl Hydrophobic Tails (pages 3287–3295)

      Widchaya Radchatawedchakoon, Aungkana Krajarng, Nattisa Niyomtham, Assoc. Prof. Dr. Ramida Watanapokasin and Assoc. Prof. Dr. Boon-ek Yingyongnarongkul

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201001622

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      Undercover delivery: Cationic lipids with asymmetric acyl–cholesteryl hydrophobic tails were synthesized by solid-phase chemistry (see scheme). The transfection efficiency of these cationic lipids when formulated as liposomes was investigated. Some of them exhibited higher transfection efficiency than commercially available gene delivery reagents.

  8. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. Preview: Chem. Eur. J. 12/2011 (page 3299)

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201190053

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