Chemistry - A European Journal

Cover image for Vol. 17 Issue 35

August 22, 2011

Volume 17, Issue 35

Pages 9541–9843

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
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    1. Cover Picture: Thermal Activation of Methane and Ethene by Bare MO.+ (M=Ge, Sn, and Pb): A Combined Theoretical/Experimental Study (Chem. Eur. J. 35/2011) (page 9541)

      Kai Chen, Dr. Zhe-Chen Wang, Dr. Maria Schlangen, Prof. Dr. Yun-Dong Wu, Dr. Xinhao Zhang and Prof. Dr. Helmut Schwarz

      Version of Record online: 12 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201190173

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      A competition between hydrogen-atom abstraction and oxygen-atom transfer, two important elementary steps in many chemical transformations, is presented in the Full Paper by H. Schwarz, X. Zhang et al. on page 9619 ff. A gas-phase study at atomic level may provide intrinsic information for a catalytic system. However, as reminded by Gerhard Ertl and a Chinese old saying, “a baguette is more than the sum of its crumbs” or “one cannot appreciate the wisdom of a whole game from a single move”.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
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  3. News

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    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Communications
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  4. Minireview

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    1. Energy Up-Conversion

      Energy Up-Conversion by Low-Power Excitation: New Applications of an Old Concept (pages 9560–9564)

      Prof. Paola Ceroni

      Version of Record online: 29 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101102

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      Up, up and away: Energy up-conversion, the generation of a high-energy excited state by absorption of two low-energy photons, is an emerging technique with possible applications in different fields, such as harnessing red or infrared solar photons to power photovoltaic devices.

  5. Communications

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    1. Cross-Coupling

      Nickel-Catalyzed C[BOND]P Cross-Coupling by C[BOND]CN Bond Cleavage (pages 9566–9570)

      Meng Sun, Hong-Yu Zhang, Qi Han, Kuo Yang and Prof. Shang-Dong Yang

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101930

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      Prosperous coupling: A nickel-catalyzed C[BOND]P cross-coupling reaction with Me3SiPPh2 by carbon–cyano bond cleavage has been developed. This method is characterized by its simplicity and wide application to the synthesis of various monophosphorus and P,N bidentate ligands (see scheme).

    2. Domino Reactions

      Diverted Domino Reactivity in Tertiary Skipped Diynes: A Convenient Access to Polyfunctionalized Cyclohexadienones and Multivalent Aromatic Scaffolds (pages 9571–9575)

      Dr. David Tejedor, Dr. Sara López-Tosco, Dr. Javier González-Platas and Dr. Fernando García-Tellado

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101676

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      Diverting is the game! A new domino manifold has been implemented for the synthesis of cyclohexadienone-based scaffolds from tertiary skipped diynes and secondary amines. The manifold takes advantage of a new O-enolate-driven reactivity pattern discovered for these diynes. The scaffolds are conveniently transformed into the corresponding multivalent salicylate derivatives (see scheme).

    3. Hydrogenation

      Chiral Phosphoric Acid Catalyzed Enantioselective Transfer Hydrogenation of ortho-Hydroxybenzophenone N[BOND]H Ketimines and Applications (pages 9576–9580)

      Dr. Thanh Binh Nguyen, Dr. Qian Wang and Dr. Françoise Guéritte

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101694

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      Unprotected synthesis: The first enantioselective chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of unprotected ortho-hydroxybenzophenone N[BOND]H imines by using a Hantzsch ester as the hydrogen source afforded the corresponding chiral N,O-unprotected ortho-hydroxydiarylmethylamines in high yields with excellent enantioselectivities (see scheme).

    4. C[BOND]H Activation

      Palladium-Catalyzed Regioselective Aerobic Oxidative C[BOND]H/N[BOND]H Carbonylation of Heteroarenes under Base-Free Conditions (pages 9581–9585)

      Hua Zhang, Dong Liu, Caiyou Chen, Chao Liu and Prof. Aiwen Lei

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101300

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      Clearing the air! By using a balloon pressure of CO, the direct oxidative carbonylation of various heteroarenes with different alcohols was achieved in good to high yields with air as the oxidant in the presence of PdCl2(PPh3)2 (see scheme). Notably, this transformation was carried out under base-free conditions. The reaction showed remarkably high regioselectivity and presents an environmentally benign protocol for the synthesis of carboxylic acid derivatives.

    5. Continuous-Flow Chemistry

      Rapid Access to α-Alkoxy and α-Amino Acid Derivatives through Safe Continuous-Flow Generation of Diazoesters (pages 9586–9589)

      Dr. Hannah E. Bartrum, Dr. David C. Blakemore, Prof. Dr. Christopher J. Moody and Prof. Dr. Christopher J. Hayes

      Version of Record online: 27 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101590

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      Microreactors: A highly efficient continuous-flow process has been developed for the synthesis of diazoesters from arylsulfonylhydrazones by means of in-flow Bamford–Stevens reactions. Furthermore, a range of α-alkoxy and α-amino acid derivatives have been prepared in excellent yields through rhodium(II)-mediated O[BOND]H and N[BOND]H insertions, without the need to isolate or handle the potentially hazardous diazo species (see scheme).

    6. Nanotechnology

      Multivalued Logic Gates Based on DNA (pages 9590–9594)

      Dr. Fang Pu, Prof. Dr. Jinsong Ren, Xinjian Yang and Prof. Dr. Xiaogang Qu

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101140

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      Alternative concept of logic: The ensemble of DNA on the surface of silica nanoparticles could be used to design ternary logic gates, which go beyond common binary operations. Herein, by assigning more than two possible states to input and output signals, thereby implementing multi-valued logic, the densities of information can be increased (see scheme).

    7. Continuous-Flow Chemistry

      In Situ Generation and Intramolecular Schmidt Reaction of Keto Azides in a Microwave-Assisted Flow Format (pages 9595–9598)

      Dr. Thomas O. Painter, Dr. Paul D. Thornton, Mario Orestano, Dr. Conrad Santini, Prof. Michael G. Organ and Prof. Jeffrey Aubé

      Version of Record online: 27 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100768

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      Go with the flow! A method for conversion of keto halides to lactams by means of sequential azidation and intramolecular Schmidt reaction in a combined flow format is described (see scheme; MWI=microwave irradiation, TFA=trifluoroacetic acid).

    8. Recyclable Catalysts

      Recyclable Catalysts for Palladium-Catalyzed Aminations of Aryl Halides (pages 9599–9604)

      Andreas Dumrath, Christa Lübbe, Dr. Helfried Neumann, Dr. Ralf Jackstell and Prof. Dr. Matthias Beller

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100984

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      Aminated and recycled: Palladium/imidazolium phosphane catalysts enable efficient and general aminations of aryl halides, including direct amination with ammonia. Subsequent recycling is possible without any additional heterogenization (see scheme).

    9. Single-Molecule Magnets

      [MnIII6O3Ln2] Single-Molecule Magnets: Increasing the Energy Barrier Above 100 K (pages 9605–9610)

      Dr. Małgorzata Hołyńska, Dejan Premužić, Ie-Rang Jeon, Dr. Wolfgang Wernsdorfer, Dr. Rodolphe Clérac and Prof. Stefanie Dehnen

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101807

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      Bridging the gap! [MnIII6O3(saO)6(OCH3)6Ln2(CH3OH)4(H2O)2] (Ln=La (1), Tb (2), saOH2=salicylaldoxime) were synthesized by a two-step self-assembly process from MnCl2, saOH2, and Ln(NO3)3 under basic conditions in methanol. Both complexes display single-molecule magnet (SMM) properties, with 2 exhibiting one of the highest known SMM energy gaps: 103 K (see figure).

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
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    1. Cluster Compounds

      Cyanide-Bridged [Fe8M6] Clusters Displaying Single-Molecule Magnetism (M=Ni) and Electron-Transfer-Coupled Spin Transitions (M=Co) (pages 9612–9618)

      Kiyotaka Mitsumoto, Emiko Oshiro, Prof. Dr. Hiroyuki Nishikawa, Dr. Takuya Shiga, Dr. Yasuhisa Yamamura, Prof. Dr. Kazuya Saito and Prof. Dr. Hiroki Oshio

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101404

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      High-spin clusters with cyanide-bridged [Fe8Ni6] and [Fe8Co6] cores stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonds have been synthesized. The iron–nickel system behaves as a single-molecule magnet, while the iron-cobalt system exhibits an electron-transfer-coupled spin transition with the application of external stimuli.

    2. Methane Activation

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      Thermal Activation of Methane and Ethene by Bare MO.+ (M=Ge, Sn, and Pb): A Combined Theoretical/Experimental Study (pages 9619–9625)

      Kai Chen, Dr. Zhe-Chen Wang, Dr. Maria Schlangen, Prof. Dr. Yun-Dong Wu, Dr. Xinhao Zhang and Prof. Dr. Helmut Schwarz

      Version of Record online: 4 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101538

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      Catch me if you can: The Group 14 metal monoxide radical cations GeO.+, SnO.+, and PbO.+ were predicted to possess the potential for a thermal activation of CH4. A combined experimental and computational study confirms these predictions and provides mechanistic details. Moreover, the competition between hydrogen-atom abstraction from and oxygen-atom transfer to C2H4 are controlled by the corresponding bond energies.

    3. Nanoclusters

      Self-Assembly of Nanosized 0D Clusters: CdS Quantum Dot–Polyoxotungstate Nanohybrids with Strongly Coupled Electronic Structures and Visible-Light-Active Photofunctions (pages 9626–9633)

      Hyo Na Kim, Dr. Tae Woo Kim, Dr. Kyong-Hoon Choi, In Young Kim, Prof. Yong-Rok Kim and Prof. Seong-Ju Hwang

      Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100583

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      Connecting the dots: Nanohybrids of CdS—polyoxotungstate with strongly coupled electronic structures and visible-light-active photofunctions can be synthesized by electrostatically derived self-assembly of very small CdS quantum dots and polyoxotungstate nanoclusters (see image).

    4. Hydrophobic Effects

      Hydrophobic Interactions and Clustering in a Porous Capsule: Option to Remove Hydrophobic Materials from Water (pages 9634–9639)

      Christian Schäffer, Dr. Ana Maria Todea, Dr. Hartmut Bögge, Olga A. Petina, Prof. Dr. Dieter Rehder, Dr. Erhard T. K. Haupt and Prof. Dr. Achim Müller

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101454

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      Get rid of it: The Mo porous nanocapsule described removes molecules with hydrocarbon chains from water, based on interactions with the hydrophobic capsule interior—especially that of the pentagonal unit area (see figure; distances from the center to the nearest methyl C atom in Å).

    5. CO2 Complexes

      CO2 and Formate Complexes of Phosphine/Borane Frustrated Lewis Pairs (pages 9640–9650)

      Ilona Peuser, Rebecca C. Neu, Xiaoxi Zhao, Dr. Matthias Ulrich, Birgitta Schirmer, Jens A. Tannert, Dr. Gerald Kehr, Dr. Roland Fröhlich, Prof. Dr. Stefan Grimme, Prof. Dr. Gerhard Erker and Prof. Dr. Douglas W. Stephan

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100286

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      No need for frustration: A series of different phosphine/borane frustrated Lewis pairs as well as their corresponding salts was synthesized in the presence of CO2 (see figure for an example; R=C and norbornyl). The complexation and activation of CO2 in these compounds was investigated by X-ray crystallography and computational studies.

    6. DNA Repair

      Crystal Structures and Repair Studies Reveal the Identity and the Base-Pairing Properties of the UV-Induced Spore Photoproduct DNA Lesion (pages 9651–9657)

      Dipl.-Chem. Korbinian Heil, Andrea Christa Kneuttinger, Dr. Sabine Schneider, Dipl.-Biol. Ulrike Lischke and Prof. Dr. Thomas Carell

      Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100177

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      Repairing pairs: Oligonucleotides containing 5R- and 5S-configured spore photoproduct analogues were synthesized and successfully used in repair assays with spore photoproduct lyase and cocrystallized with Bacillus stearothermophilus (B. st. Pol I; see figure). New structural information concerning, for example, Watson–Crick base pairing as well as duplex distortion was gained.

    7. Chemical Synthesis, Crystal Structure and Enzymatic Evaluation of a Dinucleotide Spore Photoproduct Analogue Containing a Formacetal Linker (pages 9658–9668)

      Dr. Gengjie Lin, Dr. Chun-Hsing Chen, Dr. Maren Pink, Prof. Dr. Jingzhi Pu and Prof. Dr. Lei Li

      Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101821

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      Exclusive insight: The dinucleotide spore photoproduct (SP) isostere 5R-CH2SP depicted has been successfully prepared. The neutral linker dramatically facilitates the crystallization process, which enables the determination of the crystal structure for this intriguing thymine dimer half a century after its discovery. This new isostere provides important structural insight for this special thymine dimer existing exclusively in bacterial endospores.

    8. Drug Delivery

      Excellent Correlation between Drug Release and Portal Size in Metalla-Cage Drug-Delivery Systems (pages 9669–9677)

      Nicolas P. E. Barry, Dr. Olivier Zava, Prof. Dr. Paul J. Dyson and Dr. Bruno Therrien

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201003530

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      Efficient drug delivery: Modular and adjustable supramolecular drug-delivery metalla-cages (see figure) have been evaluated. The rate of release of the guest molecule into cancer cells is controlled by the portal size of the host.

    9. DNA Detection

      Mechanistic Studies of Fc-PNA(⋅DNA) Surface Dynamics Based on the Kinetics of Electron-Transfer Processes (pages 9678–9690)

      Dr. Nina Hüsken, Dr. Magdalena Gębala, Dr. Fabio La Mantia, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Schuhmann and Prof. Dr. Nils Metzler-Nolte

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201003764

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      Electrochemical DNA sensing: N-Terminally ferrocenylated (Fc) and C-terminally gold-surface-bound peptide nucleic acid (PNA) strands were exploited as unique tools for the electrochemical investigation of the surface dynamics of short PNA(⋅DNA) strands. The kinetic differences between Fc-PNA/Au and Fc-PNA⋅DNA/Au interfaces (see figure), evoked by differences in the strand-bending elasticities and charges, present the foundation for an electrochemical DNA-sensing strategy based on Fc-PNA(⋅DNA) bending dynamics.

    10. Fluorescent Probes

      A Highly Sensitive and Selective Fluorescent Probe for Cyanide Based on the Dissolution of Gold Nanoparticles and Its Application in Real Samples (pages 9691–9696)

      Xiaoding Lou, Yi Zhang, Prof. Jingui Qin and Prof. Zhen Li

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100389

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      Sensitive and selective cyanide detection based on the dissolution of polymer-functionalized gold nanoparticles (NPs) by cyanide: Fluorescence of imidazole-functionalized polyfluorene P1 is completely quenched on coordination to Au NPs, but in the presence of CN ions the Au NPs dissolve to form soluble [Au(CN)2] ions, and the fluorescence of P1 is restored.

    11. Intercalation Agents

      Bioactive Unnatural Somatostatin Analogues through Bioorthogonal Iodo- and Ethynyl-Disulfide Intercalators (pages 9697–9707)

      Anne Pfisterer, Dr. Klaus Eisele, Xi Chen, Dr. Manfred Wagner, Prof. Dr. Klaus Müllen and Prof. Dr. Tanja Weil

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100287

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      Building bridges: Iodo- and ethynyl-containing bisalkylating bioconjugation agents were synthesized and introduced into the peptide hormone somatostatin through intercalation into the disulfide bridge (see scheme; blue=intercalating moiety, green=active site, red=disulfide bridge). The reaction mechanism was elucidated and the biological activity of one of the derivatives was demonstrated.

    12. Nanostructures

      Controlled Synthesis of Monodisperse Sub-100 nm Hollow SnO2 Nanospheres: A Template- and Surfactant-Free Solution-Phase Route, the Growth Mechanism, Optical Properties, and Application as a Photocatalyst (pages 9708–9719)

      Dr. Wei Wu , Shaofeng Zhang , Juan Zhou , Dr. Xiangheng Xiao , Dr. Fen Ren  and Prof. Changzhong Jiang 

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100694

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      Shape and size control of sub-100 nm SnO2 hollow nanostructures, such as the depicted hollow nanospheres, was achieved by a mild template- and surfactant-free hydrothermal route starting from potassium stannate and urea in ethylene glycol/water. Precise control of morphology and size is possible by varying reaction parameters, such as reaction time, urea concentration, and reaction temperature.

    13. Synthetic Methods

      Samarium Diiodide Induced Cyclizations of γ-, δ- and ε-Indolyl Ketones: Reductive Coupling, Intermolecular Trapping, and Subsequent Transformations of Indolines (pages 9720–9730)

      Dr. Christine Beemelmanns, Prof. Dr. Dieter Lentz and Prof. Dr. Hans-Ulrich Reissig

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100981

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      A series of indolyl ketones was cyclized with samarium diiodide and the resulting carbanionic intermediates were trapped with various electrophiles. The obtained highly substituted indoline derivatives now bearing a quarternary center, a structural motif found in many indole alkaloids, were subjected to different chemical transformations leading to a range of synthetically valuable building blocks (see scheme).

    14. Natural Products

      Synthesis of the Anti-HIV Agent (−)-Hyperolactone C by Using Oxonium Ylide Formation–Rearrangement (pages 9731–9737)

      Prof. David M. Hodgson and Dr. Stanislav Man

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101082

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      Under control: A 10-step asymmetric synthesis of (−)-hyperolactone C from (S)-styrene oxide features a RhII-catalysed oxonium ylide formation–[2,3] sigmatropic rearrangement as the key step, forging the two adjacent, fully substituted stereocentres of the natural product with good control (see scheme).

    15. Polymers

      Size Dependence of the Folding of Multiply Charged Sodium Cationized Polylactides Revealed by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry and Molecular Modelling (pages 9738–9745)

      Dr. Julien De Winter, Dr. Vincent Lemaur, Dr. Renaud Ballivian, Dr. Fabien Chirot, Dr. Olivier Coulembier, Dr. Rodolphe Antoine, Dr. Jérôme Lemoine, Dr. Jérôme Cornil, Prof. Philippe Dubois, Dr. Philippe Dugourd and Dr. Pascal Gerbaux

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100383

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      Folding the ions: Ion mobility and molecular dynamics are used to highlight the size dependence of the folding of multiply charged polylactide ions, prepared by electrospray ionization, around cationizing agents. Whatever the charge state, gas-phase spherical objects are obtained upon the perfect screening of the cations by the polymer chain (see figure).

    16. Nanocrystals

      Seed-Mediated and Iodide-Assisted Synthesis of Gold Nanocrystals with Systematic Shape Evolution from Rhombic Dodecahedral to Octahedral Structures (pages 9746–9752)

      Pei-Ju Chung, Lian-Ming Lyu and Prof. Michael H. Huang

      Version of Record online: 18 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101155

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      A seminal approach: By progressively increasing the volume of KI used in a growth solution while keeping the amount of added ascorbic acid constant, nanocrystals with morphologies that vary from rhombic dodecahedral to rhombicuboctahedral, edge- and corner-truncated octahedral, corner-truncated octahedral, and octahedral structures were synthesized by a seed-mediated growth approach (see figure; scale bars=50 nm).

    17. Gels

      Versatile Low-Molecular-Weight Hydrogelators: Achieving Multiresponsiveness through a Modular Design (pages 9753–9761)

      Dr. Lilia Milanesi, Prof. Christopher A. Hunter, Dr. Nadejda Tzokova, Prof. Jonathan P. Waltho and Dr. Salvador Tomas

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100640

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      Stimulate the transition: Our limited ability in predicting self-assembly in water hampers the design of new hydrogelators. The problem is exacerbated when multiresponsiveness is required; the need of introducing multiple chemical switches imposes further limitations on the design. Herein efficient multiresponsive hydrogelators based on a modular design are presented. Each module has a chemical switch with the appropriate hydrophilicity to make it compatible with gel assembly (see figure).

    18. Natural Product Synthesis

      Total Synthesis of Bryostatins: The Development of Methodology for the Atom-Economic and Stereoselective Synthesis of the Ring C Subunit (pages 9762–9776)

      Prof. Dr. Barry M. Trost, Prof. Dr. Alison J. Frontier, Dr. Oliver R. Thiel, Dr. Hanbiao Yang and Dr. Guangbin Dong

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002898

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      Ring the bell for ring C: The development of chemoselective and atom-economical methods for the stereoselective assembly of the ring C subunit of the bryostatin natural products is described. A Pd-catalyzed tandem alkyne–alkyne coupling/6-endo-dig cyclization sequence was explored and successfully pursued in the synthesis of a dihydropyran ring system. Elaboration of this methodology ultimately led to a concise synthesis of the ring C subunit of bryostatins.

    19. Atom-Economic and Stereoselective Syntheses of the Ring A and B Subunits of the Bryostatins (pages 9777–9788)

      Prof. Barry M. Trost, Dr. Hanbiao Yang, Dr. Cheyenne S. Brindle and Dr. Guangbin Dong

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002930

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      Economic breakthrough! A synthesis of rings A and B of the bryostatins (see scheme) led to the development of numerous atom-economic and selective reactions, including a Ru-catalyzed ene–yne coupling/Michael addition.

    20. Total Syntheses of Bryostatins: Synthesis of Two Ring-Expanded Bryostatin Analogues and the Development of a New-Generation Strategy to Access the C7–C27 Fragment (pages 9789–9805)

      Dr. Barry M. Trost, Dr. Hanbiao Yang and Dr. Guangbin Dong

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002932

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      Like a three-ring circus: The synthesis of new ring-expanded bryostatin analogues (see scheme) that possess anticancer activity is reported. Key steps include a selective, high-yielding Ru-catalyzed tandem enyne coupling/Michael addition and a ring-closing metathesis to form the 31-membered ring macrocycles. Given the difficulty in forming the C16–C17 olefin at a late stage, the development of a new strategy to form the C7–C27 fragment is also described.

    21. Electrochemistry

      Probing Charge Transfer between Shells of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Sorted by Outer-Wall Electronic Type (pages 9806–9815)

      Dr. Martin Kalbac, Dr. Alexander A. Green, Prof. Mark C. Hersam and Prof. Ladislav Kavan

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100590

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      Nanotube wall types: Raman and in situ Raman spectroelectrochemical characterization of sorted double-walled carbon nanotubes (grown by chemical vapor deposition) with either metallic (M) or semiconducting (S) outer tubes allowed us to distinguish the charge-transfer effects for all four inner/outer-tube electronic-type combinations (see figure).

    22. Photooxidation

      Selective Photocatalytic Oxidation of Alcohols to Aldehydes in Water by TiO2 Partially Coated with WO3 (pages 9816–9824)

      Daijiro Tsukamoto, Makoto Ikeda, Dr. Yasuhiro Shiraishi, Dr. Takayoshi Hara, Dr. Nobuyuki Ichikuni, Dr. Shunsuke Tanaka and Prof. Takayuki Hirai

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100166

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      Undercover catalyst: TiO2 particles loaded with WO3 (WO3/TiO2) promote selective photocatalytic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes in water with molecular oxygen. The catalysts show the highest aldehyde selectivity of previously reported photocatalytic systems, and show higher catalytic activity than pure TiO2. The high aldehyde selectivity is due to partial coverage of the TiO2 surface by the WO3 layer (see figure), which suppresses subsequent photocatalytic decomposition of the formed aldehyde on the TiO2 surface.

    23. Polymorphism

      Control of Surface Wettability and Photomicropatterning with a Polymorphic Diarylethene Crystal upon Photoirradiation (pages 9825–9831)

      Daichi Kitagawa, Itsuka Yamashita and Prof. Dr. Seiya Kobatake

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201100385

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      Photomicropatterning: Thermodynamic phase transitions from a platelet photochromic crystal to a polymorphic needle-like crystal and from the amorphous state to the needle-like crystal changed the surface roughness and contact angle with water. Photomicropatterning of the crystal growth has been successfully achieved using a photomask by inducing a photochromic reaction (see figure).

    24. Nucleotides

      Solid-Phase Synthesis of (Poly)phosphorylated Nucleosides and Conjugates (pages 9832–9842)

      Dipl.-Chem. Viktoria Caroline Tonn and Prof. Dr. Chris Meier

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201101291

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      Solid-supportedcycloSal-nucleotides: Phosphorylated biomolecules and phosphate-bridged bioconjugates were synthesized in high purity by conversion of solid-supported cycloSal-nucleotides. The general applicability of this method is shown by the use of different nucleosides and various phosphate-containing nucleophiles yielding (d)NDPs, (d)NTPs, (d)NDP-sugars, and 5′,5′-dinucleoside diphosphates (see scheme).

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    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: Chem. Eur. J. 36/2011 (page 9843)

      Version of Record online: 12 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/chem.201190176

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