Membrane Supported Virus Separation from Biological Solutions

Authors

  • Tanja A. Grein,

    1. University of Applied Sciences Mittelhessen, Institute of Bioprocess Engineering and Pharmaceutical Technology, Wiesenstraße 14, 35390 Giessen, Germany
    2. EHC-memtec UG, Petersweiher 40, 35394 Giessen, Germany
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  • Zoltan Kovacs,

    1. University of Applied Sciences Mittelhessen, Institute of Bioprocess Engineering and Pharmaceutical Technology, Wiesenstraße 14, 35390 Giessen, Germany
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  • Mehrdad Ebrahimi,

    1. University of Applied Sciences Mittelhessen, Institute of Bioprocess Engineering and Pharmaceutical Technology, Wiesenstraße 14, 35390 Giessen, Germany
    2. EHC-memtec UG, Petersweiher 40, 35394 Giessen, Germany
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  • Dr. Ronald Michalsky,

    1. Brown University, School of Engineering, 182 Hope Street, Providence, Rhode Island 02912, USA
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  • Prof. Peter Czermak

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Applied Sciences Mittelhessen, Institute of Bioprocess Engineering and Pharmaceutical Technology, Wiesenstraße 14, 35390 Giessen, Germany
    2. Kansas State University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Durland Hall 1005, Manhattan, Kansas 66506, USA
    • University of Applied Sciences Mittelhessen, Institute of Bioprocess Engineering and Pharmaceutical Technology, Wiesenstraße 14, 35390 Giessen, Germany
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Abstract

Industrial production of cell culture-derived viruses or virus-like particles for gene therapy or as expression systems for vaccine production is a complex multi-step process. Unfortunately, process intensification and optimization efforts mostly focus on increased reactor yields, neglecting the potential for materials design and process development for downstream unit operations that often are the bottleneck of a biopharmaceutical manufacturing process. Membrane-based virus filtration represents an economical trade-off towards biotechnological downstream processing with moderate to high yields and purity on one hand and relative fast process kinetics, and thereby reduced equipment size and costs, on the other hand. This article provides a short review of recent development and applications of membrane materials and membrane-based unit operations for virus separation in the manufacturing trains of vaccines or viral vectors for gene therapy.

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