Optimisation of petroleum refinery water network systems retrofit incorporating reuse, regeneration and recycle strategies

Authors

  • Cheng Seong Khor,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Centre for Process Systems Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, U.K.
    2. Chemical Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak, Malaysia
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  • Nilay Shah,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Centre for Process Systems Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, U.K.
    • Department of Chemical Engineering, Centre for Process Systems Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, U.K.
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  • Shuhaimi Mahadzir,

    1. Chemical Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak, Malaysia
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  • Ali Elkamel

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1
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Abstract

Scarcities in freshwater supply and increasingly stringent rules on wastewater discharges have emerged as major environmental concerns for petroleum refineries. Hence, this work attempts to develop an optimisation framework for refinery water network systems design and retrofit that integrates the complementary advantageous features of water pinch analysis (WPA). The framework explicitly incorporates water minimisation strategies by first postulating a superstructure representation that embeds all feasible flowsheet alternatives for implementing water reuse, regeneration and recycle (W3R) opportunities. Subsequently, a nonlinear programming (NLP) model is formulated based on the superstructure and computational experiments on a real-world case study are conducted using the GAMS/CONOPT3 modelling language platform. Post-optimality analysis on the numerical results are performed to achieve the desired water reuse quality, hence presenting a viable framework to aid decision-making in water network systems synthesis. © 2011 Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering

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