Rhythm Control for Management of Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: Balancing the Use of Antiarrhythmic Drugs and Catheter Ablation

Authors

  • Juan F. Viles-Gonzalez MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai Heart (Viles-Gonzalez, Fuster, Halperin, Reddy), Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
    • Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai Heart, Mount Sinai Hospital, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1030, New York, NY 10029
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  • Valentin Fuster MD, PhD,

    1. Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai Heart (Viles-Gonzalez, Fuster, Halperin, Reddy), Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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  • Jonathan Halperin MD,

    1. Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai Heart (Viles-Gonzalez, Fuster, Halperin, Reddy), Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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  • Hugh Calkins MD,

    1. Johns Hopkins Heart and Vascular Institute (Calkins), School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Vivek Y. Reddy MD

    1. Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai Heart (Viles-Gonzalez, Fuster, Halperin, Reddy), Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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Abstract

Antiarrhythmic drug (AAD) therapy may be beneficial for patients with symptoms attributable to atrial fibrillation despite adequate rate control. The limited long-term efficacy of AAD and the relatively large proportion of patients discontinuing therapy because of side effects led to the development of nonpharmacological therapies to achieve rhythm control. Pressing questions remain about the effect of ablation therapy on long-term patient outcomes. Based on recent clinical trials and meta-analyses, ablation appears more effective and possibly safer than AAD for long-term maintenance of sinus rhythm in selected patients, but the evidence is insufficient to recommend ablation in preference to drug therapy as the first AAD therapy for the majority of patients in whom a rhythm control strategy is justified. Herein, we review the most current evidence supporting the use of AAD and catheter ablation in atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Hugh Calkins, MD is a consultant to Sanofi Aventis, Biosense Webster, and Medtronic, and he receives research support from Biosense Webster and Medtronic. All other authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

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