Enhanced External Counterpulsation Has No Lasting Effect on Ambulatory Blood Pressure

Authors

  • Ole May MD, PhD, FESC,

    Corresponding author
    1. Cardiovascular Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Region Hospital Herning, Herning, Denmark
    • Cardiovascular Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Region Hospital Herning, Gl. Landevej 61, 7400 Herning, Denmark
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  • Wael Abdulla Mohammed Khair MD

    1. Cardiovascular Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Region Hospital Herning, Herning, Denmark
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Abstract

Background:

Enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP) has been reported to reduce blood pressure (BP) using clinic BP readings. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a course of EECP on BP using ambulatory BP (ABP) measurements.

Hypothesis:

EECP has a lasting BP lowering effect.

Methods:

Patients referred for EECP due to refractory angina pectoris were consecutively included in the study. The ABPs were measured for 24 hours using a Spacelabs Ultralite 90217 device at 5 time points during the study period: 2 months before the EECP course, just before the EECP course, just after the EECP course, and at 3 and 12 months after EECP. Antihypertensive medication was held constant during the study period. Changes in BP were tested by repeated measures analysis.

Results:

Fifty patients were included in the study. The mean age was 63 years, and 72% were male. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Angina Grading Scale class improved from a mean of 2.6 to 1.5. The mean daytime ABPs were 114/69, 114/70, 115/71, 114/70, and 116/71 mm Hg and the mean nighttime ABPs were 107/63, 108/63, 106/62, 108/63, and 107/62 mm Hg at 2 months before the EECP course, just before the EECP course, just after the EECP course, and at 3 and 12 months after EECP, respectively (all P > 0.10). Further, when controlling for quartiles of baseline ABP level, no significant change in ABP was found.

Conclusions:

Enhanced external counterpulsation treatment has no lasting effect on ABP.

The study was supported by a grant from the Danish Heart Foundation (grant no. 06-10-B551-A1204-22346) and from “Ringkøbing Amts Sundhedsvidenskabelige Forskningsfond.” The authors have no other funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

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